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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIXES." National Research Council. 1987. Report From the 1986 Workshop on Integrated Data Base Development for the Building Industry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19177.
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Page 73
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIXES." National Research Council. 1987. Report From the 1986 Workshop on Integrated Data Base Development for the Building Industry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19177.
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Page 72

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APPENDIX 1 BIOGRAPHICAL BACKGROUND OF PARTICIPANTS Gifford H. Albright Program Director Structures and Building Systems National Science Foundation 1800 G Street, NW. Room 1110 Washington, DC 20550 Gifford Albright is program director for structures and building systems in the Engineering Directorate of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The Structures and Building Systems Program provides support for fundamental research in structures, building systems and construction processes including computer-aided design of integrated building systems. Construction automation research-information processing, equipment automation, and computer-integrated construction is a major thrust area in the NSF program. Mr. Albright is professor of architectural engineering (on leave) at Penn State University where he served as founding head of that department in 1963 and was instru- mental in establishing in 1965 the AE Cad Lab at Penn State for instruction and research on the "MODCON" System--A Man-machine Optimum Design Construction and Operation Network System. Since that time he has actively participated in computer-aided design and construction developments. James G. Anderson Consultant Facility HQB01D Control Data Corporation 8100 34th Avenue South Bloomington, MN 55420 James Anderson began his career with the computer industry in 1969. He has worked in several areas including operations, programming, analysis, physical specifications, systems implementation, applications design and implementa- tion. Mr. Anderson is currently working with data base development method- ologies. Since 1982, he has been involved with data base technology. During this time he has designed and implemented data base driven applications for the engineering areas. A recent development effort produced an integrated data base for use by the utilities industry for design of the piping structures. His fields of expertise are data base development using a three schema architecture and integrated of information required for processing user requirements. 73

72 for its potential extension to larger scale projects. In particular, the techniques developed for reducing barriers should be evaluated. The existing prototype IDB demonstration project should be expanded to carry out facility management functions. Options for loading already available data, using facility management software, or developing suitable operation and maintenance applications should be considered.

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