National Academies Press: OpenBook

Nutrient Requirements of Swine: Eighth revised edition, 1979 (1979)

Chapter: COMPOSITION OF FEEDS AND MINERAL SOURCES

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Suggested Citation:"COMPOSITION OF FEEDS AND MINERAL SOURCES." National Research Council. 1979. Nutrient Requirements of Swine: Eighth revised edition, 1979. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19882.
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Page 27
Suggested Citation:"COMPOSITION OF FEEDS AND MINERAL SOURCES." National Research Council. 1979. Nutrient Requirements of Swine: Eighth revised edition, 1979. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19882.
×
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"COMPOSITION OF FEEDS AND MINERAL SOURCES." National Research Council. 1979. Nutrient Requirements of Swine: Eighth revised edition, 1979. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19882.
×
Page 29
Suggested Citation:"COMPOSITION OF FEEDS AND MINERAL SOURCES." National Research Council. 1979. Nutrient Requirements of Swine: Eighth revised edition, 1979. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19882.
×
Page 30
Suggested Citation:"COMPOSITION OF FEEDS AND MINERAL SOURCES." National Research Council. 1979. Nutrient Requirements of Swine: Eighth revised edition, 1979. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19882.
×
Page 31
Suggested Citation:"COMPOSITION OF FEEDS AND MINERAL SOURCES." National Research Council. 1979. Nutrient Requirements of Swine: Eighth revised edition, 1979. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19882.
×
Page 32

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COMPOSITION OF FEEDS AND MINERAL SOURCES In formulating diets to meet the recommended nutrient requirements of swine, it is necessary to know the nu- trient composition and the bioavailability of nutrients in each ingredient used. Tables 9 and 10 give the composi- tion of ingredients commonly used in swine diets. Values in the tables have been compiled from several National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council re- ports.* Data were also obtained from the International Feedstuffs Institute, Utah State University, \ the Sub- committee on Feed Composition of the NBC Committee on Animal Nutrition, \ and from individuals at univer- sities, agricultural experiment stations, commercial feed companies, and the Feedstuffs Yearbook, Volume 48 (1976). Individual ingredients may vary widely in composition because of the variation in species or variety, storage conditions, climate, soil moisture, and nutrient status. Variations in analytical procedures also affect values ob- tained. Therefore, the values given are an average and are subject to interpretation. In the previous edition, the names of feed ingredients included considerable detail as to how the ingredient was processed and the grade or quality. In this edition, short ingredient names are listed and only those commonly used in swine feeding are included. A six-digit Interna- tional Feed Number is given for each ingredient. The first digit is the class designation.§ In computer formulation this reference number may be used as the "numerical name" of an ingredient. This number is also listed after each Official Feed Definition in the Association of American Feed Control Officials Handbook.^ Nutrient content is expressed on an "as fed" or "as is" basis. For weight-unit conversion factors and weight equivalents see Tables 3 and 4. In addition to feedstuffs composition, the sources and composition of minerals frequently fed to swine are listed in Table 11. The percentage of the mineral in each min- eral source is given for the pure compound. The percent purity for technical and feed grade sources should, there- fore, be multiplied by the listed percentage in this table to arrive at the percent of the element in the source being used. Abbreviations for Terms Used in Tables 9 and 10 DE dehy kcal kg ME w digestible energy dehydrated kilocalories kilogram(s) metabolizable energy with 'Atlas of Nutritional Data on United States and Canadian Feeds, 1971. ISBN 0-309-01919-2. United States-Canadian Tables of Feed Composition, 1969. ISBN 0-309-01684-3. Nutrient Requirements of Poultry, 1977. ISBN 0-309-02725-X. Nutrient Requirements of Swine, 1973. ISBN 0-309-02140-5. t Lorin E. Harris, Director. i Joseph H. Conrad, Chairman, J. R. Aitken, Charles W. Deyoe, Lorin E. Harris, Paul W. Moe, Rodney L. Preston and Peter J. Van Soest. § 1. Dry forages and roughages 2. Pasture, range plants, and forages fed green 3. Silages 4. Energy feeds 5. Protein supplements 6. Minerals 7. Vitamins 8. Additives || Epps, Ernest A., Jr., Division of Agricultural Chemistry, P.O. Box 16390-A, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803. 27

28 Nutrient Requirements of Swine TABLE 9 Average Composition of Some Feed Ingredients Commonly Used in Swine Diets (Excluding Amino Acids)" Interna- tional Feed Number' Minerals Dry Matter Energy (kcal/kg) P.- tein (*) Ether Crude Fiber (*) Cal- cium Phos- phorus Potas- sium Chlo- Line K, M.I.I (*) rine No. (*) DE ME (*) (*) (*) (*) 01 Alfalfa meal, dehy., 17% protein 1-00-023 92 2580 2270 17.5 2.5 24.1 1.44 0.22 2.40 0.46 02 Barley 4-00-549 80 3086 2870 11.6 1.8 5.1 0.05 0.36 0.48 0.15 03 Barley, Pacific Coast 4-07-939 80 3130 2940 9.0 2.0 6.4 0.05 0.32 0.53 0.15 04 Beans, field (Vicia/afca) 5-09-262 80 3263 3080 26.0 1.4 8.2 0.14 0.54 1.20 — 05 Beet pulp, dried 4-00-669 91 2866 2345 8.0 0.5 21.0 0.60 0.10 0.21 — 06 Blood meal, spray or ring dried 5-00-381 86 2690 1927 85.0 1.0 0.6 0.30 0.25 0.90 0.27 07 Brewers dried grains 5-02-141 02 1940 1710 25.3 6.2 15.3 0.29 0.52 0.09 0.12 08 Corn, dent yellow, grain 4-02-935 89 3525 3325 8.8 3.8 2.2 0.02 0.28 0.30 0.04 00 Corn and cob meal 4-02-849 85 3086 2500 7.8 3.0 10.0 0.04 0.21 0.45 0.04 10 Corn, gluten feed 5-02-903 00 3307 2400 22.0 2.5 10.0 0.40 0.80 0.57 0.22 11 gluten meal, 41% 5-02-411 91 3230 3069 41.0 2.5 4.0 0.23 0.55 0.31 0.11 12 Corn, distillers grain w/solubles, dehy. 5-02-843 93 3568 3390 27.2 9.0 9.1 0.35 0.95 1.00 0.17 13 Corn, distillers solubles, dehy. 5-02-844 92 3307 2900 28.5 9.0 4.0 0.35 1.33 1.75 0.26 14 Corn, hominy feed 4-02-887 00 3615 3365 10.0 6.9 6.0 0.04 0.50 0.67 0.05 15 Cottonseed meal, mechanical extracted 5-01-609 03 2954 2453 40.9 3.9 12.6 0.17 1.05 1.19 0.04 16 Cottonseed meal, solvent extracted 5-01-619 92 2689 2555 41.4 1.5 11.3 0.15 0.97 1.22 0.03 17 Feather meal 5-03-795 03 2778 2270 86.4 3.3 1.0 0.20 0.80 0.31 — 18 Fish meal, anchovy 5-01-985 92 3086 2450 64.2 10.0 1.0 3.73 2.43 0.90 0.29 19 herring 5-02-000 03 3086 2500 72.3 10.0 0.7 2.29 1.70 1.50 0.90 20 Menhaden 5-02-009 02 2734 2230 60.5 9.4 0.7 5.11 2.88 0.77 0.60 21 Fish solubles, condensed 5-01-969 51 3307 3190 31.5 4.0 0.2 0.30 0.50 1.74 2.65 22 Meat and bone meal, 50% 5-09-322 03 2866 2434 50.4 8.6 2.8 10.10 4.96 1.40 0.74 23 Meat meal, 55% 5-09-323 92 2998 2540 54.4 7.1 2.5 8.27 4.10 1.40 0.91 24 Molasses, beet 4-00-668 70 2460 2320 6.1 0.0 0.0 0.13 0.06 4.83 1.30 25 Molasses, cane 4-04-696 74 2469 2343 2.9 0.0 0.0 0.82 0.08 2.38 — 26 Oats 4-03-309 89 2866 2668 11.4 4.2 10.8 0.06 0.27 0.37 0.11 27 Oat groats (dehulled oats) 4-03-331 91 3690 3400 16.0 5.5 3.0 0.07 0.43 0.34 — 28 Peas 5-03-600 00 3527 3200 23.8 1.3 5.5 0.11 0.42 1.02 0.06 29 Peanut meal, expeller 5-03-649 90 3600 3200 45.0 7.3 12.0 0.16 0.55 1.12 0.03 30 Peanut meal, solvent 5-03-650 90 2845 2920 47.0 1.2 13.1 0.20 0.65 1.15 — 31 Rapeseed meal, solvent 5-03-871 94 2998 2670 35.0 1.8 12.4 0.66 1.09 0.80 — 32 Rice bran, solvent 4-03-930 91 3080 2200 12.9 0.6 11.4 0.07 1.50 1.35 0.07 33 Rice, broken 4-03-932 89 2513 2360 8.7 1.7 9.8 0.08 — — 0.08 34 Rice, polishings 4-03-943 90 3792 3000 12.2 11.0 4.1 0.05 1.31 1.06 0.11 35 Rye, grain 4-04-047 89 3307 2712 12.6 1.8 2.8 0.08 0.30 0.46 — 36 Safflower meal, solvent 5-04-110 91 2960 2435 28.5 0.5 30.6 0.40 1.10 0.80 — 37 Sesame meal, expeller 5-04-220 93 3130 2560 42.0 7.0 6.5 1.99 1.37 1.20 0.06 38 Skim milk, dried 5-01-175 92 3792 3360 33.5 0.9 0.0 1.28 1.02 1.59 0.50 30 Sorghum, grain (Milo) 4-04-444 89 3439 3229 8.9 2.8 2.3 0.03 0.28 0.32 0.09 40 Soybeans, full-fat cooked 5-04-597 90 4056 3540 37.0 18.0 5.5 0.25 0.58 1.61 0.03 41 Soybean meal, dehulled, solvent 5-04-612 90 3860 3485 48.5 1.0 3.9 0.27 0.62 2.02 0.05 42 Soybean meal, expeller 5-04-600 90 3483 2990 42.6 4.0 6.2 0.27 0.61 1.83 0.07 43 Soybean meal, solvent 5-04-604 89 3350 3090 44.0 0.8 7.3 0.29 0.65 2.00 0.05 44 Sunflower meal, dehulled, solvent 5-04-739 93 2998 2605 42.0 2.9 12.2 0.37 1.00 1.00 0.10 45 Wheat bran 4-05-190 90 2513 2320 15.7 4.0 11.0 0.14 1.15 1.19 0.06 46 Wheat shorts 4-05-201 89 3175 2910 16.8 •12 8.2 0.11 0.76 0.88 0.07 47 Wheat middlings 4-05-205 88 3050 2940 16.0 3.0 7.0 0.12 0.90 0.60 0.03 48 Wheat, hard, red winter 4-05-268 87 3483 3220 14.1 1.9 2.4 0.05 0.37 0.45 0.05 49 Wheat, soft, red winter 4-05-294 86 3659 3416 10.2 1.8 2.4 0.05 0.31 0.40 0.08 50 Whey, dried 4-01-182 93 3439 3190 13.6 0.8 1.3 0.97 0.76 1.05 1.50 51 Whey, low lactose 4-01-186 91 3307 2750 15.5 1.0 0.3 1.95 0.98 3.00 2.10 52 Yeast, brewers dried 7-05-527 93 3135 2707 44.4 1.0 2.7 0.12 1.40 1.70 0.12 • As fed basis. ' I hi' first digit is the feed class, coded as follows: (1) dry forages and roughages; (2) pasture, range plants and forages fed green; (3) silages; (4) energy feeds; and (5) protein supplements.

Nutrient Requirements of Swine 29 Mag- So- dium Sul- fir Man- ganese Sele- nium (mg/kg) Vitamins Panto thenic Acid (mg/kg) Pyri- doxine Ribo- flavin (mg/kg) Thia- min (mg/kg) Vitamin •u Vitamin E Line No. nesium Copper (mg/kg) Iron Zinc (mg/kg) Biotin (mg/kg) Choline (mg/kg) Folacin (mg/kg) Niacin (mg/kg) (%) (%) (*) (mg/kg) (mg/kg) (mg/kg) (mg/kg) (IU/kg) 01 0.26 0.08 0.21 8.2 310 28.0 0.60 17 0.30 1097 6.3 38 28.4 6.5 15.7 3.4 0.004 125 02 0.14 0.04 0.15 7.5 50 8.0 0.10 17 0.08 990 0.5 63 9.2 3.0 1.2 4.0 — 36 03 0.12 0.02 — 7.7 60 16.3 0.10 15 0.15 1034 0.5 48 7.0 2.9 1.6 5.5 __ 36 04 0.13 0.80 — 4.1 70 8.4 — 42 0.09 1670 — 22 3.0 — 1.6 5.5 — 1 05 0.27 0.32 0.20 12.5 300 35.0 — 0.7 — 800 — 20 0.8 — 1.1 0.2 — — 06 0.22 0.33 0.32 8.1 3000 6.4 — 306 0.30 749 0.3 22 1.1 4.4 1.3 0.5 0.440 — 07 0.16 0.15 0.31 21.1 250 37.8 0.70 98 0.96 1723 7.1 29 8.0 0.7 1.4 0.5 — 25 08 0.12 0.02 0.08 3.4 35 5.0 0.04 10 0.11 530 0.2 34 7.5 7.0 1.0 3.5 — 22 09 0.13 0.01 0.18 6.7 70 7.7 0.07 9 0.05 393 0.3 17 4.0 5.0 0.9 __ — 19 10 0.29 0.95 0.22 47.9 460 23.8 0.10 48 0.33 1518 0.3 66 17.0 15.0 2.4 2.0 — 15 11 0.05 0.07 0.40 28.3 400 8.9 1.00 20 0.18 330 0.2 50 10.0 7.9 1.7 0.2 — 20 12 0.35 0.90 0.30 44.7 280 30.0 0.39 80 0.30 3400 0.9 80 11.0 2.2 8.6 3.5 — 40 13 0.64 0.26 0.37 82.7 560 73.7 0.33 85 1.40 4842 1.1 116 21.0 10.0 11.6 6.9 — 55 14 0.24 0.10 0.03 13.3 70 14.5 — 3 0.13 1500 0.3 46 8.0 11.0 2.2 7.9 — — 15 0.42 0.04 0.40 18.6 160 22.9 0.90 57 0.60 2753 2.7 38 7.7 5.3 4.2 9.7 — 15 16 0.40 0.04 — 17.8 110 20.2 — — 0.55 2933 2.7 40 9.9 3.0 4.0 7.7 — 15 17 0.20 0.71 — — — 21.0 — — 0.04 891 0.2 27 10.0 — 2.1 0.1 0.600 — 18 0.24 1.10 0.54 9.3 220 9.5 1.36 103 0.23 5100 0.2 135 20.0 4.0 7.1 0.1 0.352 6 19 0.15 0.61 0.69 4.5 80 4.7 1.93 132 0.20 5306 0.5 142 22.0 4.0 9.9 0.1 0.588 17 20 0.16 0.41 0.45 10.8 440 33.0 2.10 147 0.15 3056 1.0 55 9.0 4.0 4.9 0.2 0.150 7 21 0.02 3.10 0.12 44.9 30 14.4 2.00 38 0.18 4028 — 169 35.0 12.2 14.6 5.5 0.347 — 22 1.12 0.72 0.26 1.5 490 14.2 0.25 93 0.14 1996 0.6 46 4.1 12.8 4.4 02 0.070 0.8 23 1.13 0.73 0.26 1.5 440 12.3 0.25 103 0.14 2077 0.6 57 5.0 3.0 5.5 0.2 — O.H 24 0.23 — 0.48 17.7 70 4.7 — 14 0.70 880 — 48 4.0 — 2.1 — __ 4.4 25 0.35 0.90 0.35 59.6 200 42.2 — — 0.70 660 — 45 39.0 __ 2.3 0.9 __ 4.4 26 0.16 0.06 0.21 5.9 70 43.2 0.30 1 0.30 1100 0.4 15 29.2 1.0 1.1 6.0 — 20.0 27 0.09 — 0.20 6.4 90 28.6 — — 0.20 1232 0.3 18 11.0 — 1.3 6.8 — 15.0 28 — 0.04 — — 50 — — 30 0.18 642 0.4 17 4.6 1.0 0.8 1.8 — — 29 0.32 — 0.28 — — 24.8 — — 0.39 1640 — 165 46.8 — 5.1 7.1 — 2.9 30 0.40 0.10 — — — 29.9 — — 0.39 1980 — 165 50.6 — 11.0 6.6 — 3.0 31 0.51 0.50 — 7.0 180 43.0 0.98 66 — 6464 — 153 9.0 7.0 3.7 1.7 — 19.1 32 0.95 0.07 0.18 13.0 190 138.0 — 30 4.20 1135 — 293 23.0 14.0 2.5 22.5 — 59.8 33 0.11 0.07 0.06 — — 18.0 — 17 0.08 800 0.2 46 8.0 — 0.7 — — 14.5 34 0.65 0.10 0.17 — 160 — — — 0.61 1237 — 520 47.0 — 1.8 19.8 — 90.0 35 0.12 0.02 0.15 7.8 100 66.9 — 31 0.60 — 0.6 16 9.2 — 1.5 4.4 — 15.0 36 0.37 0.06 — 10.8 560 19.8 — 44 1.56 2247 0.5 60 43.8 — 11.3 2.8 — 0.9 37 0.86 0.04 0.43 — — 47.9 — 100 0.34 1690 — 30 6.0 12.5 3.6 2.8 — — 38 0.11 0.44 0.31 11.5 50 2.0 0.12 40 0.33 1250 0.6 12 33.0 3.9 22.0 3.5 0.010 9.1 39 0.20 0.01 0.09 14.1 40 12.9 — 14 0.09 678 0.2 41 12.0 3.2 1.1 4.0 — 12.0 40 0.21 0.28 0.22 15.8 80 29.8 0.11 16 0.27 2420 3.5 22 15.6 10.8 2.6 6.6 — 0.9 41 0.27 0.34 0.43 36.3 120 27.5 0.10 45 0.32 2850 0.7 22 15.0 5.0 2.9 1.7 — a3 42 0.26 0.27 0.33 18.0 140 30.7 0.10 60 0.33 2703 0.5 37 14.0 — 3.7 1.7 — 6.1 43 0.27 0.34 0.43 36.3 120 29.3 0.10 27 0.32 2794 0.5 60 13.3 8.0 2.9 1.7 — 2.1 44 0.75 2.00 — 3.5 30 22.9 — — 1.45 2894 — 220 10.0 16.0 3.1 — — 11.0 45 0.52 0.05 0.22 10.2 170 100.0 0.50 95 0.10 980 1.8 321 31.0 7.0 3.1 8.0 — 10.8 46 0.26 0.07 0.23 12.1 100 115.0 0.50 106 0.10 930 1.4 100 17.6 11.0 2.0 19.9 — 29.9 47 0.29 0.60 0.16 4.4 40 43.0 0.80 64 0.10 1100 0.6 53 13.0 9.0 •1.2 18.9 — — 48 0.17 0.04 0.12 10.6 50 62.2 0.06 14 0.04 1090 0.4 56 13.5 3.4 1.4 4.5 — 12.6 49 0.10 0.04 0.12 9.7 40 51.3 0.06 14 0.04 788 0.4 48 11.0 4.0 1.2 4.3 — 13.2 50 0.13 2.00 1.04 40.0 130 6.1 0.06 — 0.34 1980 0.8 10 44.0 4.0 27.1 4.1 0.015 0.2 51 0.25 1.50 — — — 14.0 0.06 — 0.64 4392 1.4 19 69.0 4.0 29.9 5.7 0.015 — 52 0.23 0.07 0.38 32.8 120 5.2 1.00 39 1.05 3984 9.9 448 109.0 42.8 37.0 91.8 — —

30 Nutrient Requirements of Swine TABLE 10 Average Amino Acid Composition of Some Commonly Used Feedstuffs" Interna- tional Feed Number' Pro- tein (*) Argi- nine »} Hist.. Iso- leucine (*) Leu- 1 .\ cine sine Mi tli, onine (*) Cys- Phenyl- alanine (*) Tyro- Thre- onine Tryp- tophan (*) dine (*) (*) (*) 'UH (*) MU< (*) (*) Valine (*) Alfalfa meal, dehy., 17% protein 1-00-023 17.5 0.8 0.3 0.8 1.3 0.73 0.2 0.2 0.8 0.6 0.70 0.28 0.8 Barley 4-00-549 11.6 0.6 0.3 0.1 0.8 0.40 0.2 0.3 0.6 0.3 0.42 0.14 0.6 Barley, Pacific Coast 4-07-939 9.0 0.5 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.29 0.1 0.2 0.5 03 0.30 0.12 05 Beans, field (Vina f aba) 5-09-262 27.4 2.5 0.7 1.1 1.9 1.72 0.2 0.2 1.2 0.7 3.96 0.24 1.2 Beet pulp, dried 4-00-669 8.0 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.6 0.60 0.01 0.01 0.3 0.4 0.40 0.10 0.4 Blood meal, spray or ring dried 5-00-381 85.0 4.1 5.5 1.0 12.7 8.10 1.5 1.5 7.3 3.0 4.90 1.10 9.1 Brewers dried grains 5-02-141 25.3 0.8 0.6 1.4 2.5 0.90 0.6 0.4 1.5 1.2 0.98 0.34 1.7 Corn, dent yellow, grain 4-02-935 8.8 0.5 0.2 0.4 1.1 0.24 02 0,2 0.5 0.5 0.39 0.05 0.4 Corn and cob meal 4-02-849 7.8 0.4 0.2 0.4 1.0 0.18 0.1 0.1 0.4 — 0.35 0.07 0.4 Corn, gluten feed 5-02-903 22.0 1.0 0.7 0.7 1.9 0.63 0.5 0.5 0.8 0.6 0.89 0.10 1.0 gluten meal, 41% 5-02-411 40.6 1.4 1.0 2.2 7.2 0.78 1.0 0.7 2.9 1.0 1.40 0.21 2.2 Corn, distillers grain w/solubles, dehy. 5-02-843 27.2 1.0 0.7 1.0 2.6 0.60 0.6 0.3 1.2 0.7 0.92 0.19 1.3 Corn, distillers solubles, dehy. 5-02-844 28.5 1.1 0.7 1.3 2.1 0.90 0.5 0.4 1.3 1.0 1.00 0.30 1.4 Corn, hominy feed 4-02-887 10.0 0.5 0.2 0.4 0.8 0.40 0.1 0.1 0.4 0.5 0.40 0.10 0.5 Cottonseed meal, mechanical extracted 5-01-609 40.9 1.3 1.1 1.6 2.5 1.51 0.6 0.6 2,2 1.1 1.38 0.55 2.0 Cottonseed meal, solvent extracted 5-01-619 41.4 4.6 1.1 1.3 2.4 1.71 0.5 0.6 2,2 1.0 1.32 0.47 1.9 Feather meal 5-03-795 86.4 3.9 0.3 2.7 6.7 1.10 0.4 3.0 2.7 ii.3 2.80 0.50 4.6 Fish meal, anchovy 5-01-985 64.2 3.7 1.5 3.0 5.0 5.10 1.9 0.6 2.7 22 2.68 0.74 3,1 herring 5-02-000 72.3 4.8 1.7 3.2 5.3 5.70 2.1 0.7 2.8 2.3 3.00 0.81 4.4 Menhaden 5-02-009 60.5 3.8 1.5 2.9 5.0 4.83 1.8 0.6 2.5 2.0 2.50 0.68 3. 2 Fish solubles, 50% solids 5-01-969 31.5 1.6 1.6 0.7 1.9 1.73 0.5 0.3 0.9 0.4 0.86 0.31 1.2 Meat and bone meal, 50% 5-09-322 50.4 3.6 1.2 1.4 3.2 2.60 0.7 0.3 1.5 0.8 1.50 0.28 2.3 Meat meal, 55% 5-09-323 54.4 3.7 13 1.6 3.3 3.00 0.8 0.7 1.7 1.8 1.74 0.36 2.6 Oats 4-03-309 11.4 0.8 0.2 0.5 0.9 0.40 0,2 0.2 0.6 0.5 0.43 0.16 0.7 Oat groats (dehulled oats) 4-03-331 16.0 0.7 0.3 0.5 1.0 0.60 0.2 0.3 0.7 0.9 0.50 0.18 0.7 Peas 5-03-600 23.8 1.4 0.7 1.1 1.8 1.60 0.3 0.2 1.3 — 0.94 0.24 1.3 Peanut meal, expeller 5-03-649 45.0 4.7 1.1 1.8 3.6 1.55 0.4 0.7 2.6 — 1.40 0.46 2.6 Peanut meal, solvent 5-03-650 47.0 4.9 1.2 2.1 3.7 1.76 0.4 0.8 2.8 2.0 1.45 0.48 2.8 Rapeseed meal, solvent 5-03-871 35.0 1.9 1.0 1.3 2.3 2.10 0.7 0.4 1.4 0.8 1.53 0.45 1.8 Rice bran, solvent 4-03-930 12.9 0.9 0.3 0.4 0.9 0.59 0.2 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.48 0.15 0.6 Rice, broken 4-03-932 8.7 0.6 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.24 0.1 0.1 0.3 — 0.27 0.10 0.5 Rice, polishings 4-03-943 12.2 0.8 0.2 0.4 0.8 0.57 i>.2 0.1 o.r, 0.6 0.40 0.13 0.8 Rye, grain 4-04-047 12.6 0.5 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.49 0.2 0.2 0.6 0.3 0.86 0.12 0.6 Safflower meal, solvent 5-04-110 28.5 3.7 1.0 1.7 2.5 1.30 0.7 0.7 1.9 — 1.35 0.60 2.3 Sesame meal, expeller 5-04-220 42.0 4.2 1.1 2.1 3.3 1.30 1.2 0.6 2.2 2.0 1.65 0.80 2.4 Skim milk, dried 5-01-175 33.5 1.1 0.8 2.2 3.2 2.40 0.9 0.4 1.6 1.1 1.60 0.44 2.3 Sorghum, grain (Milo) 4-04-383 8.9 0.4 0,3 0.5 1.4 0.22 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.27 0.10 0.5 Soybeans, full-fat cooked 5-04-597 37.0 2.8 0.9 2.0 2.8 2.40 0.5 0.6 1.8 1.2 1.50 0.55 1.8 Soybean meal, dehulled, solvent 5-04-612 48.5 3.7 1.3 2.6 3.8 3.18 0.7 0.7 2.1 2.0 1.91 0.67 2.7 Soybean meal, solvent 5-04-604 44.0 3.3 1.2 2.4 3.5 2.93 0.7 0.7 2.3 1.3 1.81 0.62 2.3 Sunflower meal, dehulled, solvent 5-04-739 42.0 3.3 1.4 2.8 3.9 1.70 0.7 0.7 2.9 1.2 2.13 0.71 3.2 Wheat bran 4-05-190 15.7 1.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 0.59 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.4 0.42 0.30 0.7 Wheat, hard, red winter 4-05-268 14.1 0.6 0.2 0.6 0.9 0.40 0.2 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.37 0.18 0.6 Wheat middlings 4-05-205 16.0 1.8 0.4 0.6 1.1 0.69 0.2 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.49 0.20 0.7 Wheat shorts 4-05-201 16.8 1.2 0.5 o.e 1.1 0.81 0.2 0.3 0.7 0.5 0.61 0.19 0.8 Wheat, soft, red winter 4-05-294 10.2 0.4 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.31 0.2 0.2 0.5 0.4 0.32 0.12 0.4 Whey, dried 4-01-182 12.0 0.3 0.2 0.8 1.2 0.97 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.89 0.19 0.7 Whey, low lactose 4-01-186 15.5 0.7 0.1 0.3 0.2 1.47 0.6 0.6 0.1 0.2 0.50 0.18 03 Yeast, brewers dried 4-05-527 44.4 2.2 1.1 2.1 3.2 3.23 0.7 0.5 1.8 1,5 2.06 0.49 2,3 •As fed basis. The first digit is the feed class, coded as follows: (1) dry forages and roughages; (2) pasture, range plants and forages fed green; (3) silages; (4) energy feeds and (5) protein supplements.

Nutrient Requirements of Swine 31 TABLE 11 Common Mineral Sources For Swine Mineral Source Chemical Formula Mineral Content" Calcium Calcium carbonate 40%Ca 0.02%Na Limestone 38%Ca 0.05%Na 0.01%F Calcium and Bone meal 24%Ca 12.6 %P 0.37%Na 0.05%F phosphorus Phosphate, curacao 36%Ca 14 %P 0.3 %Na 0.54%F defluorinated 30-34%Ca 18 %P 5.7 %Na 0.16%F dicalcium 18-24%Ca 18.5 %P 0.6 %Na 0.14%F mono and dicalcium 16-19%Ca 21 %P 0.6 %Na 0.20%F soft rock 17%Ca 9 %P 0.1 %Na 1.2 %F sodium tripoly 0 25 %P 31.2 %Na 0.03%F Sodium and Sodium chloride 39.3 %Na 60.7 %C1 chlorine Iron Ferrous sulfate FeSO4 H20 32.9 %Fe Ferrous sulfate FeSO^H,O 20.1 %Fe Ferric ammonium citrate 16.5-18.5 %Fe Ferrous fumarate FeC^,O, 32.9 %Fe Ferric chloride Fed 3 6H2O 20.7 %Fe Ferrous carbonate FeC03 48.2 %Fe Ferric oxide Fef>3 69.9 %Fe Ferrous oxide FeO 77.8 %Fe Copper Cupric carbonate CuCO,Cu(OH)2 57.5 %Cu Cupric chloride CuCl^H,O 37.3 %Cu Cupric hydroxide Cu(OH)2 65.1 %Cu Cupric oxide CuO 79.9 %Cu Cupric sulfate CuSO4 5H20 25.4 %Cu Manganese Manganese carbonate MnCO3 47.8 %Mn Manganous chloride MnCl24H2O 27.8 %Mn Manganous oxide MnO 77.4 %Mn Manganese sulfate MnSO< 5H.O 22.7 %Mn Manganous sulfate MnSO, Hf> 32.5 %Mn Zinc Zinc carbonate 5ZnO 2CO34H2O 56.0 %Zn Zinc chloride ZnCI2 48.0 %Zn Zinc oxide ZnO 80.3 %Zn Zinc sulfate ZnSO< 7H2O 22.7 %Zn Zinc sulfate ZnSQ, H,O 36.4 %Zn Iodine Calcium iodate CadO,), 65.1 %I Potassium iodide KI 76.4 %I Cuprous iodide Cul 66.6 %I Penta calcium orthoperiodate CasdO,), 39.3 %I Selenium Sodium selenite Na,SeO3 45.6 %Se 26.6 %Na Sodium selenate Na,SeO, 41.8 %Se 24.3 %Na " Actual mineral levels in technical grade sources may vary.

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