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Nutrient Requirements of Poultry: Ninth Revised Edition, 1994 (1994)

Chapter: Appendix B: Estimating the Energy Value of Feed Ingredients

« Previous: Appendix A: Documentation of Nutrient Requirements
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Estimating the Energy Value of Feed Ingredients." National Research Council. 1994. Nutrient Requirements of Poultry: Ninth Revised Edition, 1994. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2114.
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TABLE B–1 Estimating the Energy Value (kcal/kg dry matter) of Feed Ingredients from Proximate Composition (components as percentage of ingredient unless otherwise noted)

Ingredient

Prediction Equation

Reference

Cereal grains and milling by-products

Corn grain

MEn = 36.21 × CP + 85.44 × EE + 37.26 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Sorghum (tannin <0.4%)

MEn = 31.02 × CP + 77.03 × EE + 37.67 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Sorghum (tannin >1.0%)

MEn = 21.98 × CP + 54.75 × EE + 35.18 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Sorghum

ME = 3,152 - 357.79 × tannic acid

Gous et al., 1982

Sorghum

MEn = 38.55 × DM - 394.59 × tannic acid

Janssen, 1989

Sorghum

ME = 3,062 + 887 × CF - 202.5 × (CF)2

Moir and Connor, 1977

Sorghum

ME = 4,412 - 90.34 × ADF

Moir and Connor, 1977

Sorghum

ME = 3,773 + 65.73 × APF - 3.272 × (APF)2

Moir and Connor, 1977

Triticale

MEn = 34.49 × CP + 62.16 × EE + 35.61 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Wheat

MEn = 34.92 × CP + 63.1 × EE + 36.42 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Polished rice, rice polishings

MEn = 46.7 × DM - 46.7 × ash - 69.55 × CP + 42.95 × EE - 81.95 × CF

Janssen, 1989

Rice bran, solvent extracted

MEn = 46.7 × DM - 46.7 × ash - 69.54 × CP + 42.94 × EE - 81.95 × CF

Janssen, 1989

Rice products

MEn = 4,759 - 88.6 × CP - 127.7 × CF + 52.1 × EE

Janssen et al., 1979

Bakery by-product

MEn = 34.49 × CP + 76.1 × EE + 37.67 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Dried bakery products

TMEn = 4,340 - 100 × CF - 40 × ash - 30 × CP + 10 × EE

Dale et al., 1990

Wheat middlings, wheat bran

MEn = 40.1 × DM - 40.1 × ash - 165.39 × CF

Janssen, 1989

Wheat and wheat products (feeds in meal form)

MEn = 3,985 - 205 × CF

Janssen et al., 1979

Wheat and wheat products (feeds in pellet form)

MEn = 3,926 - 181 × CF

Janssen et al., 1979

Barley and barley products

MEn = 3,078 - 90.4 × CF + 9.2 × STA

Janssen et al., 1979

Oats and oat products

MEn = 2,970 - 59.7 × CF + 116.9 × EE

Janssen et al., 1979

Starch industry by-products

Corn wet-milling by-products

MEn = 4,240 - 34.4 × CP - 159.6 × CF + 13.5 × EE

Janssen et al., 1979

Corn gluten meal (65% crude protein)

MEn = 40.94 × CP + 88.17 × EE + 33.13 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Corn gluten meal (40% crude protein)

MEn = 36.64 × CP + 73.3 × EE + 25.67 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Corn gluten feed (20% crude protein)

MEn = 42.35 × DM - 42.35 × ash - 23.74 × CP + 28.03 × EE - 165.72 × CF

Janssen, 1989

Sugar industry products

Beet or cane molasses

MEn = 40.01 × SUG

Janssen, 1989

Sugar

MEn = 38.96 × SUG

Janssen, 1989

Distillers by-products

Brewer's dried grains, corn distillers' dried solubles, corn distillers' dried grains, corn distillers' dried grains plus solubles

MEn = 39.15 × DM - 39.15 × ash - 9.72 × CP - 63.81 × CF

Janssen, 1989

Yeast, torula

MEn = 34.06 × CP + 40.82 × EE + 26.91 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Dried roots

Sweet potatoes (dried)

MEn = 8.62 × CP + 50.12 × EE + 37.67 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Tapioca meal (e.g., cassava)

MEn = 39.14 × DM - 39.14 × ash - 82.78 × CF

Janssen, 1989

Tapioca meal (e.g., cassava)

MEn = 4,054 - 43.4 × ash - 103 × CF

Janssen et al., 1979

Oilseeds, oilseed meals, and by-products

Cottonseed meal, expeller or solvent

MEn = 21.26 × DM + 47.13 × EE - 30.85 × CF

Janssen, 1989

Cottonseed products

MEn = 2,153 - 31.8 × CF + 43.5 × EE

Janssen et al., 1979

Peanut meal, expeller or solvent

MEn = 29.68 × DM + 60.95 × EE - 60.87 × CF

Janssen, 1989

Peanut products

MEn = 3,072 - 39.1 × ash - 47.6 × CF + 63.7 × EE

Janssen et al., 1979

Rapeseed meal, solvent, high glucose

MEn = 29.73 × CP + 46.39 × EE + 7.87 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Rapeseed meal, solvent, double zero

MEn = 32.76 × CP + 64.96 × EE + 13.24 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Soybean meal, expeller

MEn = 37.5 × CP + 70.52 × EE + 14.9 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Soybean meal, solvent

MEn = 37.5 × CP + 46.39 × EE + 14.9 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Soybean meal (solvent or expeller process)

MEn = 2,702 - 57.4 × CF + 72.0 × EE

Janssen et al., 1979

Soybeans, heat treated, meal

MEn = 36.63 × CP + 77.96 × EE + 19.87 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Soybeans, heat treated, pellet

MEn = 38.79 × CP + 87.24 × EE + 18.22 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Full-fat soybeans (feeds in meal form)

MEn = 2,769 - 59.1 × CF + 62.1 × EE

Janssen et al., 1979

Full-fat soybeans (feeds in pellet form)

MEn = 2,636 - 55.7 × CF + 82.5 × EE

Janssen et al., 1979

Sunflower seeds, unextracted

MEn = 36.64 × CP + 89.07 × EE + 4.97 × NFE

Janssen, 1989

Sunflower products

MEn = 3,999 - 189 × ash - 58.5 × CF + 59.5 × EE

Janssen et al., 1979

Sunflower, expeller, with hulls

MEn = 26.7 × DM + 77.2 × EE - 51.22 × CF

Janssen, 1989

Sunflower, expeller or solvent, decorticated

MEn = 6.28 × DM - 6.28 × ash + 25.38 × CP 62.62 × EE

Janssen, 1989

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Estimating the Energy Value of Feed Ingredients." National Research Council. 1994. Nutrient Requirements of Poultry: Ninth Revised Edition, 1994. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2114.
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This classic reference for poultry nutrition has been updated for the first time since 1984. The chapter on general considerations concerning individual nutrients and water has been greatly expanded and includes, for the first time, equations for predicting the energy value of individual feed ingredients from their proximate composition.

This volume includes the latest information on the nutrient requirements of meat- and egg-type chickens, incorporating data on brown-egg strains, turkeys, geese, ducks, pheasants, Japanese quail, and Bobwhite quail.

This publication also contains new appendix tables that document in detail the scientific information used to derive the nutrient requirements appearing in the summary tables for each species of bird.

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