National Academies Press: OpenBook

Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation (2015)

Chapter: Study Committee Biographical Information

« Previous: Appendix B: Demonstration of Competitive Rate Benchmarking to Identify Unusually High Rates
Page 260
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×

STUDY COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION


Richard L. Schmalensee, Chair, is Howard W. Johnson Professor of Management Emeritus and Professor of Economics Emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He was the John C. Head III Dean of the MIT Sloan School of Management from 1998 through 2007 and was a member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1989 through 1991. He was formerly Director of the MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research and a member of the MIT Energy Council. Dr. Schmalensee is a Fellow of both the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has been a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has served on the Executive Committee of the American Economic Association. He is a Director of the National Bureau of Economic Research and the International Data Group, and he is Chairman of the Board of Directors of Resources for the Future. He has served on several other National Research Council (NRC) committees: the Committee on America’s Climate Choices; the Panel on Conceptual, Measurement, and Other Statistical Issues in Developing Cost-of-Living Indexes for Indexing Federal Programs; the Committee on National Statistics; and the Study on Transportation and a Sustainable Environment. His research and teaching have focused on industrial organization economics and its applications to business decision making and public policy. He was the 2012 Distinguished Fellow of the Industrial Organization Society. Dr. Schmalensee holds an SB and a PhD in economics from MIT.

Kenneth D. Boyer is a Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at Michigan State University, where he has taught since 1975. Previously, he served as an Associated Research Fellow at the

Page 261
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×

International Institute of Management in West Berlin, Germany. Dr. Boyer is an Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Regulatory Economics and Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review. He has been a member of several NRC committees, including the Committee on Freight Transportation Data: A Framework for Development and the Committee for the Study of Public Policy for Surface Freight Transportation. He holds a BS in economics from Amherst College and an MS and a PhD in economics from Michigan State University.

Jerry Ellig is Senior Research Fellow at the Mercatus Center, George Mason University, and a former assistant professor of economics at George Mason University. He specializes in the federal regulatory process, economic regulation, and telecommunications regulation. Dr. Ellig has published numerous articles on government regulation and business management in both scholarly and popular periodicals, including the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Barron’s, the Washington Post, Regulation and Governance, Risk Analysis, Administrative Law Review, the Journal of Regulatory Economics, and the New York University Journal of International Law and Politics. His most recent book, coauthored with his Mercatus colleagues Maurice McTigue and Henry Wray, is Government Performance and Results: An Evaluation of GPRA’s First Decade. Previously, he was Deputy Director and Acting Director of the Office of Policy Planning at the Federal Trade Commission. He also served as Senior Economist for the Joint Economic Committee of the United States Congress. Dr. Ellig received his BA in economics from Xavier University and his MA and PhD in economics from George Mason University.

José A. Gómez-Ibáñez is Derek C. Bok Professor of Urban Planning and Public Policy at Harvard University, where he holds a joint appointment at the Graduate School of Design and the John F. Kennedy School of Government. He teaches courses in economics, infrastructure, and transportation policy in both schools. His research interests are in transportation, infrastructure, and economic development, and he has authored or edited a half-dozen books including Regulating

Page 262
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×

Infrastructure: Monopoly, Contracts and Discretion; Going Private: The International Experience with Transport Privatization; and Regulation for Revenue: The Political Economy of Land Use Exactions. He serves as the faculty cochair of the Infrastructure in a Market Economy Executive Program at the Kennedy School. Since 2007, he has been Chair of the Social and Urban Policy Area at the Kennedy School. He has been the Faculty Chair of the Masters in Urban Planning Program at the Design School (2001–2004), of the Masters in Public Policy Program at the Kennedy School (1996–1998), of doctoral programs at the Design School (1992–1995), and of the Department of Urban Planning and Design at the Design School (1984–1988). He has been a member of several NRC committees and chaired two: the Committee for the Study on the Relationships Among Development Patterns, Vehicle Miles Traveled, and Energy and the Committee for the Study of Public Policy for Surface Freight Transportation. Dr. Gómez-Ibáñez received an AB in government and an MPP and a PhD in public policy from Harvard University.

Anne V. Goodchild is Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington. She is also Director of the Freight Mobility Lab and Associate Director of the Freight Operations Research Program for Transportation Northwest. Her research interests lie in logistics and freight transportation, with a particular enthusiasm for maritime transportation and port operations. In her research she has evaluated strategies to improve port efficiency, the relationships between goods movement operations and air quality, the effect of new technologies on freight transportation system productivity, and the impact of travel time variability on goods movement. Her primary areas of study are containerized cargo, marine terminals, and international borders. Before returning to graduate school she worked in consulting in North America and Europe. She evaluated new products and transportation services by using mathematical modeling techniques including discrete choice modeling, optimal routing and scheduling, and simulation. She is the Chair of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committee on Intermodal Freight Transport and was a member of the TRB Committee for Adapting Freight Models and Traditional

Page 263
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×

Freight Data Programs for Performance Measurement. Dr. Goodchild holds a PhD and an MS in civil and environmental engineering from the University of California at Berkeley and a BS in mathematics from the University of California at Davis.

Wesley W. Wilson is Professor of Economics at the University of Oregon. He has published widely in the areas of transportation, industrial organization, trade, labor, agriculture, and applied econometrics. He is the Managing Editor of Economic Inquiry, a former President of the Transportation and Public Utilities Group of the American Economic Association, a member of the Inland Waterway and Agricultural Transportation Committees of TRB, a former President of the Agricultural Chapter of the Transportation Research Forum, and an Affiliated Faculty Member with the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute and Christensen Associates. He is an Associate Editor for the Journal of the Transportation Research Forum and Maritime Policy and Management, a member of the Board of Editors for the Review of Industrial Organization and Transport Policy, and a former member of the Editorial Board of Agribusiness: An International Journal. From 2003 through 2009, he was a Technical Adviser to the Navigation and Economics Technologies Program of the Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He has received a variety of grants, most notably from the National Science Foundation (with Bruce Blonigen) to examine the effects of trade policy in steel markets. He holds a BS in business administration from the University of North Dakota and an MA and a PhD in economics from Washington State University.

Frank A. Wolak is Holbrook Working Professor of Commodity Price Studies in the Department of Economics, Stanford University. His fields of specialization are industrial organization and econometric theory. His recent work involves methods for introducing competition into infrastructure industries—telecommunications, electricity, water delivery, and postal delivery services—and for assessing the impacts of these competition policies on consumer and producer welfare. From 1998 through 2011, he was the Chair of the Market Surveillance

Page 264
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×

Committee of the California Independent System Operator. He is a visiting scholar at the University of California Energy Institute and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He directs the Program on Energy and Sustainable Development in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He is a member of the Emissions Market Advisory Committee for California’s market for greenhouse gas emissions allowances. Dr. Wolak received a BS from Rice University and an SM in applied mathematics and a PhD in economics from Harvard University.

Page 265
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×

There was a problem loading page 265.

Page 266
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×

There was a problem loading page 266.

Page 260
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×
Page 260
Page 261
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×
Page 261
Page 262
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×
Page 262
Page 263
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×
Page 263
Page 264
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×
Page 264
Page 265
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×
Page 265
Page 266
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21759.
×
Page 266
Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB Special Report 318: Modernizing Freight Rail Regulation examines the future role of the Surface Transportation Board (STB) in overseeing and regulating the service levels and rate offerings of railroads, particularly as they become revenue adequate. The approaches recommended in this congressionally-requested report are intended to resynchronize a regulatory program that has become outdated.

The study committee finds that while the U.S. freight railroad industry has become modernized and financially stable since the Staggers Rail Act of 1980, some of the industry’s remaining economic regulations have not kept pace and should be replaced with practices better-suited for today’s modern freight rail system.

Specifically, the study committee finds that more appropriate, reliable, and usable procedures are needed for resolving rate disputes. It recommends that Congress prepare for the repeal of the current formula for screening rates for eligibility for rate relief, and direct the U.S. Department of Transportation to develop a more reliable screening tool that compares disputed rates to those charged in competitive rail markets. This tool would replace current methods that make artificial and arbitrary estimates of the cost of rail shipping.

Current adjudication methods can cost millions of dollars for litigation and some have taken years to resolve, deterring shippers with smaller claims from seeking rate relief. Simplified methods that are economically valid and practical to use have yet to be introduced. The study committee recommends that STB hearings used to rule on the reasonableness of challenged rates be replaced with arbitration hearings that compel faster, more economical resolutions of rate cases. It also recommends that arbitrators be empowered to use reciprocal switching as a remedy for those rates found to be unreasonable.

The study committee recommends the transfer of merger review authority to antitrust agencies. It also recommends that STB give priority to the data needed to oversee the railroads’ response to their common carrier service obligation by collecting and analyzing shipment-level data on service quality.

Press Release

Two page summary of the report

Recording of Surface Transportation Board Roundtable Discussion, October 25, 2016:

Recording of Richard Schalensee's Testimony at Surface Transportation Board Hearing, June 10, 2016:

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!