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Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know (2015)

Chapter: Study Committee Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
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Study Committee Biographical Information

Chris T. Hendrickson (NAE), Chair, is the Hamerschlag University Professor of Engineering, Director of the Traffic21 Institute, and Codirector of the Green Design Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and Editor-in-Chief of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Journal of Transportation Engineering. His expertise is in the general area of engineering planning and management, including design for the environment, system performance, construction project management, finance, and computer applications. Dr. Hendrickson has received numerous awards, among them the Fenves Systems Research Award from the Institute of Complex Engineering Systems (2002), AT&T Industrial Ecology Fellowships (2000–2002), a Lucent–National Science Foundation Industrial Ecology Fellowship (1998), the ASCE Frank M. Masters Transportation Engineering Award (1994), the ASCE Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Award (1989), and a Rhodes scholarship (1973). He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2007), a Distinguished Member of ASCE (2007), and a member of the Transportation Research Board Executive Committee. He has published numerous research articles related to computer-aided engineering, transportation systems, construction project management, and environmental systems. Central themes of this work are a systemwide perspective and a balance of engineering and management considerations. Dr. Hendrickson pioneered models of dynamic traffic equilibrium, including time-of-day departure demand models. He was an early contributor to the development of probabilistic network analysis for lifeline planning after seismic events. With others at Carnegie Mellon’s Engineering Design Research Center, he developed a pioneering, experimental building design system in the early 1990s that spanned initial concept through construction scheduling and animation. Since 1994, he has concentrated on green design and exploration of the environmental life-cycle consequences of alternative product and process designs. Dr. Hendrickson received bachelor and master of science degrees from Stanford University, a master of philosophy

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
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degree in economics from Oxford University, and a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Leigh B. Boske is Professor of Economics and Public Policy, Sharpe Centennial Fellow, and former Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Research at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin. His research has focused on transportation policy, economics, and finance. He has studied national and international transport policy issues, the role of transportation and logistics in international trade, and multimodal and intermodal transport planning. He previously served as a Senior Economist at the National Transportation Policy Study Commission of the U.S. Congress and as Chief of Economic and Environmental Analysis at the Wisconsin Department of Transportation. In 1993–1994, he took a leave of absence from the university to serve as Policy Advisor to the Texas Transportation Commission and to coordinate the development of the 1994 Texas Transportation Plan. Dr. Boske is a former member of the National Research Council’s Committee for the Review of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Strategic Plan for Research and Development, the Federal Advisory Committee on Impacts of Climate Change and Variability on the Gulf Coast’s Transportation System and Infrastructure, the Executive Committee of the U.S.–European Transatlantic Policy Consortium, the Organization of American States’ Coordinating Committee of the Inter-American Training and Research Program for Trade Corridor Development, and both the Intermodal Freight Transportation Committee and the Ports and Channels Committee of the Transportation Research Board. Dr. Boske has a PhD in economics from the University of Pittsburgh.

Michael S. Bronzini is Dewberry Chair Professor Emeritus in the Volgenau School of Engineering at George Mason University. He is principal and cofounder of 3Sigma Consultants, LLC, based in Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. Bronzini has conducted research and authored more than 250 publications on innovative solutions to complex multimodal transportation systems problems. His current work focuses on marine and intermodal transportation, freight transport, and national

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
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transportation networks and intermodal systems. He has led the development of several large inland navigation simulation and analysis models, all of which have been used for navigation feasibility studies. Most of these models or their successors are still in use by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He has served as an independent technical review consultant for the Ohio River Navigation Investment Model, was an external reviewer of the Delaware River Channel Deepening Feasibility Study, and participated in two separate studies of the capacity and expansion potential of the Panama Canal. From 1990 to 1999, Dr. Bronzini was Director of the Center for Transportation Analysis at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and was responsible for overseeing its interdisciplinary transportation research program. He was Professor and Head of Civil Engineering at Pennsylvania State University and Director of the Transportation Center and Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Tennessee. Dr. Bronzini is a National Associate of the National Academies and has held numerous leadership positions in the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, including Chair of the Inland Water Transportation Committee and Chair of the Study Committee on Landside Access to U.S. Ports. He received a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering from Stanford University and a PhD in civil engineering from Pennsylvania State University.

James J. Corbett, Jr., is Professor of Marine Science and Policy in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment at the University of Delaware, where he holds a joint appointment in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering and in the School of Public Policy and Administration in the College of Arts and Sciences. His research focuses on issues of technology policy innovation for the 21st century in the areas of freight transportation, energy and emissions, and sustainability. He has published more than 50 peer-reviewed studies on international and domestic maritime transportation and pollution policy, risk assessment and mitigation of ocean and coastal impacts from shipping, and interdisciplinary technology policy and decision making. He has provided testimony to the United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works. Dr. Corbett was

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×

a lead coauthor of all three reports to the International Maritime Organization (IMO) on greenhouse gas emissions, trends, and mitigation potential (IMO studies in 2000, 2009, and 2014). He received a bachelor of science degree in marine engineering technology from California Maritime Academy, master of science degrees in both mechanical engineering and engineering and public policy, and a PhD in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. He is certified as a professional engineer (mechanical) in California.

G. Edward Dickey has been a consultant to public and private entities interested in water project development and an affiliate professor of economics at Loyola University Maryland since his retirement from federal service in 1998. Currently, he is a Senior Advisor at Dawson & Associates, a government relations firm based in Washington, D.C. He is an expert in federal water resource policy, project planning, and benefit–cost analysis as it relates to project development and management. Dr. Dickey held several positions during his 25 years with the Department of the Army’s Civil Works Program, including service as U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters Chief of Planning. He was a Deputy Assistant Secretary for 11 years and Acting Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary and Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works during the G. H. W. Bush and Clinton administrations. He has testified before numerous congressional committees on policy and programmatic, budgetary, and project-specific issues relating to the federal role in national water and related land resources development and management. Dr. Dickey has been a member of previous National Research Council committees, including the Committee for the Study of Freight Transportation Capacity for the 21st Century (2001), the Committee on Adaptive Management for Resource Stewardship (2005), and the Committee on Climate Change and U.S. Transportation (2009). He received a PhD in economics from Northwestern University.

C. James Kruse is the Director of the Center for Ports and Waterways at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute. He is responsible for identifying research and extension needs in the port and waterways communities and mobilizing resources to meet those needs. He served

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×

in a senior executive capacity for 9 years at the Port of Brownsville, Texas (1988–1997), including 8 years as port director. Following his service at the Port of Brownsville, Mr. Kruse worked as a regional program manager for Foster Wheeler Environmental’s Ports, Harbors, and Waterways Program and assisted on port-related projects across the United States. His work has focused on political, environmental, financial, and operational issues related to waterborne transportation of cargo in both inland waterway and ocean environments. He has conducted studies for the U.S. Maritime Administration, the National Waterways Foundation, American Waterways Operators, the United Soybean Board, the Port of Houston Authority, the Port of Corpus Christi Authority, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and private industry. Among the topics of his research are externalities of marine transportation, marine transport of toxic inhalation hazard materials, North American marine highways, funding of waterway maintenance and infrastructure improvements, effects of lack of maintenance dredging, and waterway encroachment issues. Mr. Kruse has a master’s degree in international business and human resources from Houston Baptist University and an MBA in accounting and finance from the University of Kansas.

B. Starr McMullen is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Oregon State University. Her research encompasses multiple modes of transportation, including rail, motor carrier, water for freight and transit, airline, and highway for passengers. She has studied transportation industries (in particular airline, trucking, and rail) to estimate productivity, efficiency, costs, and competitiveness. Her work in freight transportation has focused on the modal choices of wheat shippers in the Pacific Northwest (truck, rail, and barge on the Columbia River system), intermodal competition for freight transportation (especially agricultural and bulk commodities), and empirical issues involved in developing useful freight performance measures and methodologies. Her current research projects focus on problems of pricing, finance, and investment in transportation infrastructure. In 2009 Professor McMullen was awarded the Researcher of the Year Award from the Oregon Transportation Research and Education Consortium for her work on the distributional impact of changing from a gasoline tax to

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×

a vehicle miles traveled fee. She is past editor of Research in Transportation Economics and serves or has served on a number of editorial boards, including those of Transportation Research Part E, the Journal of the Transportation Research Forum, and Advances in Airline Economics. Professor McMullen is past President of the Transportation and Public Utilities Group of the American Economic Association and past President of the Transportation Research Forum (TRF). In 2013 she received TRF’s Distinguished Service Award. Professor McMullen has a PhD in economics from the University of California at Berkeley with a specialization in transportation economics.

Leonard A. Shabman is a Resident Scholar at Resources for the Future. He has published on subjects including natural hazard management, wetlands and water quality management, and public investment analysis methods. He has provided advice on water and related land management policy to a wide range of nongovernmental and governmental organizations, including the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In 1977–1978 he served as a staff economist at the United States Water Resources Council. In 1984–1985 he was Scientific Advisor to the Assistant Secretary of the Army, Civil Works. His research relevant to corps policies and programs has focused on multicriteria decision making, benefit–cost analysis methods and applications, risk and uncertainty analysis, and project financing and cost sharing. Dr. Shabman has served on the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council and has chaired or been appointed to 12 National Academies Committees covering a wide array of water resource management topics. In 2005 he was named a National Associate of the National Academies. He received a PhD in resource economics from Cornell University.

Thomas H. Wakeman III is Deputy Director of the Center for Maritime Systems and Research Professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Ocean Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey, where he conducts research studies on port and navigation infrastructure and waterborne freight logistics and teaches courses on maritime activities. Before joining Stevens in 2007, he was employed by the Port Authority of New York and New

Page 212
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×

Jersey for 14 years and led the authority’s efforts in port and waterway development and construction. Earlier in his career, he worked for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for more than 23 years, where he focused on coastal engineering and navigation infrastructure (including coastal and river channel dredging in northern California and the San Francisco Bay region). In 2004, Dr. Wakeman was appointed as the Senior Maritime Advisor with the Coalition Provision Authority (during Operation Iraqi Freedom) and was stationed in Umm Qasr, Iraq, where he was responsible for the reopening of the Iraqi ports on the Khawr az-Zubayr and Shatt al-Arab waterways and enhancing port operations and freight movement to northern portions of Iraq. His recent research activities (2011–2013) include preparation of a resiliency plan for the Weirton Area Port Authority, West Virginia, for its operations on the Ohio River and an assessment of the impact and resiliency lessons learned in the Port of New York and New Jersey after Hurricane Sandy for the U.S. Department of Transportation University Transportation Research Center, Region 2.

In 2008, Dr. Wakeman was named ASCE’s New Jersey Educator of the Year, and in 2013 he was nominated and appointed as the River Representative to the Governing Board of ASCE’s Coast, Ocean, Port, and River Institute (COPRI). In 2009, he was named a Fellow in the U.S. section of the World Association for Waterborne Transport Infrastructure for contributions to the organization from 1998 to 2008, including service as International Vice President for the Western Hemisphere. In 2010, he was named a Distinguished Diplomate in both the port and the navigation engineering areas by COPRI. In 2012, he was named Marine Group chairman for the Transportation Research Board’s Technical Activities Council. He has coauthored two books and published more than 100 technical papers in his areas of expertise, and he recently served as technical reviewer for Inland Navigation, edited by T. J. Pokrefke (ASCE Press, 2013), which describes inland waterway lock and dam engineering, design, construction, and costs and economics. Dr. Wakeman received a master of science degree in civil engineering from the University of California, Davis, a master of science degree in marine biology from San Francisco State University, and a doctorate of engineering science from Columbia University, New York.

Page 206
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×
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Page 210
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×
Page 210
Page 211
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×
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Page 212
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21763.
×
Page 212
Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know Get This Book
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TRB Special Report 315: Funding and Managing the U.S. Inland Waterways System: What Policy Makers Need to Know explores the role and importance of the federally funded inland waterways system, priorities for future investment, its beneficiaries, and sources of funding.

In recent years, the inland waterways system has transported six to seven percent of all domestic ton-miles of cargo. The system is a small but important component of the national freight system, particularly for bulk commodities. The study committee finds that, in order to ensure efficient use of limited navigation resources, the most critical need for the inland waterways system is a sustainable and well-executed plan for maintaining system reliability and performance. Reliability and performance will depend on placing higher priority on investments in operations and maintenance (O&M). Without a funding strategy that prioritizes system preservation, maintenance may continue to be deferred, which would result in further deterioration and in a less cost effective and less reliable system.

The committee finds that more reliance on a “user-pays” funding strategy for the commercial navigation system is feasible, would generate new revenues for maintenance, and would promote economic efficiency.

The committee suggests that an asset management program focused on economic efficiency, fully implemented and linked to the budgeting process, would help prioritize maintenance spending and ascertain the funding levels required for reliable freight service.

View the TRB Special Report 315 webcast.

View the press release.

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