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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing Health Equity for Native American Youth: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21766.
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References

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Cajete, G. 2000. Native science—natural laws of interdependence. Santa Fe, NM: Clear Light.

Center for Native American Youth. n.d. Native American youth 101: Information on the historical context and current status of Indian Country and Native American Youth. Washington, DC: Center for Native American Youth.

Dickerson, D. L., K. L. Venner, B. Duran, J. J. Annon, B. Hale, and G. Funmaker. 2014. Drum-Assisted Recovery Therapy for Native Americans (DARTNA): Results from a pretest and focus groups. American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research 21(1):35-58.

Graham, B. L. 2001. Resilience among American Indian youth: First Nations’ youth resilience study. Doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota, 2001. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering 62.

IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2013. Leveraging culture to address health inequalities: Examples from native communities: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

LaFromboise, T. D., and B. Howard-Pitney. 1995. Suicidal behavior in American Indian female adolescents. In Women and suicidal behavior, edited by S. Canetto and D. Lester. New York: Springer. Pp. 157-173.

Masten, A. S. 2001. Ordinary magic: Resilience processes in development. American Psychologist 56:227-238.

Werner, E. E. 1992. The children of Kauai: Resiliency and recovery in adolescence and adulthood. Journal of Adolescent Research 13:262-268.

Wolsko, C., C. Lardon, G. V. Mohatt, and E. Orr. 2007. Stress, coping, and well-being among the Yup’ik of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta: The role of enculturation and acculturation. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 66(1):51-61.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing Health Equity for Native American Youth: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21766.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing Health Equity for Native American Youth: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21766.
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Page 47
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Advancing Health Equity for Native American Youth: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21766.
×
Page 48
Next: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda »
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More than 2 million Americans below age 24 self-identify as being of American Indian or Alaska Native descent. Many of the serious behavioral, emotional, and physical health concerns facing young people today are especially prevalent with Native youth (e.g., depression, violence, and substance abuse). Adolescent Native Americans have death rates two to five times the rate of whites in the same age group because of higher levels of suicide and a variety of risky behaviors (e.g., drug and alcohol use, inconsistent school attendance). Violence, including intentional injuries, homicide, and suicide, accounts for three-quarters of deaths for Native American youth ages 12 to 20. Suicide is the second leading cause of death—and 2.5 times the national rate—for Native youth ages 15 to 24.

Arrayed against these health problems are vital cultural strengths on which Native Americans can draw. At a workshop held in 2012, by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, presenters described many of these strengths, including community traditions and beliefs, social support networks, close-knit families, and individual resilience. In May 2014, the Academies held a follow-up workshop titled Advancing Health Equity for Native American Youth. Participants discussed issues related to (1) the visibility of racial and ethnic disparities in health and health care as a national problem, (2) the development of programs and strategies by and for Native and Indigenous communities to reduce disparities and build resilience, and (3) the emergence of supporting Native expertise and leadership. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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