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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21830.
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Appendix B

Workshop Agenda

June 8, 2015

7:30 am Registration

8:00 am

Welcome from the National Cancer Policy Forum

  Sharyl Nass, Institute of Medicine
  Director, National Cancer Policy Forum
 

Overview of the Workshop

  Michael Kastan, Duke Cancer Institute
  Planning Committee Chair

8:15 am

Session 1: Overview and Value of Trials That Include

  Pets in Translational Cancer Research
  Moderator: Michael Kastan, Duke Cancer Institute
 

Overview of current challenges and opportunities in oncology drug development

  Lee Helman, National Cancer Institute
 

Strengths and limitations of traditional preclinical models

  Beverly Teicher, National Cancer Institute
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21830.
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Advantages and experiences with trials that include animal patients

  Chand Khanna, National Cancer Institute
 

Group Discussion

10:10 am

Break

10:20 am

Session 2: Canine Tumor Biology and Genomics Informing Cancer Drug Development

  Moderator: Deborah Knapp, Purdue University
 

The current state of canine tumor genetics and scientific limitations

  Heidi Parker, National Human Genome Research Institute
 

Use and availability of canine cancer tissue banks in translational research

  Matthew Breen, North Carolina State University
 

Genomic resources for canine cancer research

  Jessica Alföldi, Broad Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University
 

Biology and informatics needs

  Jeff Trent, Translational Genomics Research Institute
 

Group Discussion

12:15 pm

Lunch Break

1:00 pm

Session 3: Effectively Integrating Biomarkers into Study Designs

  Moderator: Carl Barrett, AstraZeneca
 

Opportunities for preclinical evaluation of novel therapies

  Timothy Fan, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21830.
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Pharmacokinetic (PK) assessment

  Dan Gustafson, Colorado State University
 

Pharmacodynamics (PDs) and potential predictive biomarkers

  Doug Thamm, Colorado State University
 

Group Discussion

2:30 pm

Session 4: Effectively Integrating Imaging Technologies into Study Designs

  Moderator: Peter Choyke, National Cancer Institute
 

Role of trials that include pets in the development of new imaging modalities

  Peter Choyke, National Cancer Institute
 

Role of magnetic resonance imaging in studying tumor physiology: A clinical perspective

  Mark Dewhirst, Duke University
 

Group Discussion

3:30 pm

Break

3:45 pm

Session 5: Mechanisms for Comparative Oncology Trials

  Moderator: Lou DeGennaro, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
 

Single-institution studies

  Cheryl London, Ohio State University
 

Multi-institution studies

  Amy LeBlanc, National Cancer Institute
 

Group Discussion

4:45 pm

Wrap Up Day 1

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21830.
×

June 9, 2015

7:30 am

Registration

8:00 am

Session 6: Addressing the Needs of Pet Animals and Their Owners

  Moderator: Michael Lairmore, University of California, Davis
 

Trial design and appropriate oversight

  David Vail, University of Wisconsin–Madison
 

Best practices for conduct of clinical trials for animal patients

  Rod Page, Colorado State University
  Patricia Olson, Independent Advisor on Animal Health and Welfare
 

Group Discussion

9:45 am

Break

10:00 am

Session 7: The Status of Comparative Oncology in Drug Development

  Moderator: Perry Nisen, Sanford-Burnham Medical Discovery Institute
 

Panelists:

  Anne Keane, Achaogen
  John Leighton, Food and Drug Administration
  Wendy Levin, Fate Therapeutics
  Daniel Tumas, Gilead Sciences, Inc.
 

Group Discussion

11:30 am

Workshop Wrap Up

  Deborah Knapp, Purdue University
  Len Lichtenfeld, American Cancer Society

12:00 pm

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21830.
×
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21830.
×
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21830.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21830.
×
Page 62
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Traditional preclinical mouse models of cancer have been very useful for studying the biology of cancer, however they often lack key characteristics of human cancers. As a result, many novel drug candidates fail in human clinical trials despite evidence of drug efficacy in those preclinical models. Thus, researchers are seeking new approaches to augment preclinical knowledge before undertaking clinical trials for human patients.

Recently, there has been renewed interest in comparative oncology - the study of naturally developing cancers in animals as models for human disease - as one way to improve cancer drug development and reduce attrition of investigational agents. Tumors that spontaneously develop in pet dogs and other companion animals as a result of normal aging share many characteristics with human cancers, such as histological appearance, tumor genetics, biological behavior, molecular targets, and therapeutic response.

In June 2015 the Institute of Medicine hosted a workshop to examine the rationale and potential for integrating clinical trials for pet patients with naturally occurring cancers into translational cancer research and development. Participants discussed the research needs, strategies, and resources to support greater integration of clinical trials for pets with cancer into translational research pathways, and challenges and potential solutions for facilitating that integration. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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