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Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box (2016)

Chapter: Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
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D

Biographies of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE

THOMAS H. ZURBUCHEN, Chair, is a professor of space science and aerospace engineering at the University of Michigan. He was associate dean of entrepreneurial programs in the college of engineering 2009-2015, founder of the college’s center for entrepreneurship, and also senior counselor to the provost 2012-2015. In these roles, he is responsible for educational and research programs focused on innovation, entrepreneurial thought and action, and enhancing research impact. He has been at the University of Michigan for over 20 years. He is a part-time visiting scientist to the International Space Science Institute in Bern. Dr. Zurbuchen has received numerous awards, including the prestigious U.S. Presidential Early Career Award, which represents the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers. He has also received Outstanding Accomplishment Awards at the University of Michigan from his department, college, and university focused on service, mentorship, and research, as well as multiple NASA Group Achievement Awards, due to his involvement in missions such as Ulysses, MESSENGER, Wind, ACE, and Solar Orbiter. Dr. Zurbuchen, a specialist in the robotic exploration of space and expert in space plasmas, is a founder of the Solar and Heliospheric Research group currently responsible for more than 10 instruments in flight and two more under development. He served as team leader for the development of NASA’s Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer, an instrument that was part of the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury 2011-2015. He serves on the boards of four companies and nonprofits (none of which are CubeSat or space related), including as a governor-appointed trustee of Northern Michigan University. Dr. Zurbuchen holds a Ph.D. in physics and an M.S. in physics, mathematics, and astronomy from the University of Bern, Switzerland. He is currently a member of the Space Studies Board (SSB) and its executive committee at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and has had extensive previous experience as vice chair for the Committee on a Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics, vice chair and a former member of the Committee on Solar and Space Physics, member of the Plasma Science Committee, member of the Workshop Organizing Committee on Solar Systems Radiation Environment and NASA’s Vision for Space Exploration, and member of the Panel on the Sun and Heliospheric Physics.

BHAVYA LAL, Vice Chair, is a research staff member at the IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute (STPI) where she supports the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, NASA, Federal Aviation Administration, Office of the Director for National Intelligence, and other federal agencies advancing space technology and policy. Recent and ongoing projects include detecting and mitigating the effects of near Earth objects, evalu-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×

ating civilian space situational awareness role and capability, exploring commercial and global trends in space and their implications for the United States, and in general applying innovation theory to the aerospace sector (most recently in the space nuclear power and small satellite areas). Before joining STPI, Dr. Lal was president of C-STPS, a science and technology policy research and consulting firm in Waltham, Massachusetts. Prior to that, she was the director of the Center for Science and Technology Policy Studies at Abt Associates, Inc., a global policy research firm in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Lal holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), an M.S. from MIT’s Technology and Policy Program, and a Ph.D. from George Washington University. She has previously served on the Academies’ Committee on Space-Based Additive Manufacturing.

JULIE CASTILLO-ROGEZ is a planetary scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on water-rich objects from modeling and experimental perspectives applied to the formulation, design, and planning of planetary missions. Her current activities focus on Ceres, target of the Dawn mission, Mars’s moons in the frame of the human exploration program, as well as other small bodies whose study can help improve understanding of the early Solar system. Dr. Castillo-Rogez serves as the science principal investigator for NASA’s Near Earth Asteroid Scout mission, is a participating scientist in NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission (MAVEN), and is the investigation scientist for NASA’s Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) mission to Mars. Dr. Castillo-Rogez also served as the infusion scientist for the INSPIRE CubeSat mission. She cofounded the Ice Physics Laboratory at JPL in 2007, and she previously was a member of the Cassini Mission Radio Science Team. She earned a B.S. in geology from the University of Nantes, France, a M.S. in geophysics from the University of Rennes, France, and a Ph.D. in planetary geophysics from the University of Rennes, France.

ANDREW CLEGG is the spectrum engineering lead at Google, Inc. Prior to Google, he served 11 years as a program manager at the National Science Foundation (NSF), where he created the Enhancing Access to the Radio Spectrum (EARS) program, which was focused on funding research in radio spectrum efficiency and access. He also served as NSF’s Electromagnetic Spectrum Manager, where, among other tasks, he helped the nascent CubeSat movement gain access to spectrum resources and represented the U.S. at two World Radiocommunication Conferences. Prior to NSF, he was principal member of technical staff at Cingular Wireless (now AT&T Mobility), and a senior engineer for Comsearch. He was also a member of the Remote Sensing Division at the Naval Research Laboratory immediately after graduation. Dr. Clegg earned his M.S. and Ph.D. in radio astronomy and electrical engineering from Cornell University.

PAULO C. LOZANO is an associate professor and chair of the graduate program in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. He is also the director of MIT’s Space Propulsion Laboratory. His main interests are plasma physics, space propulsion, ion beam physics, small satellites, and nanotechnology. Part of Prof. Lozano’s research topics includes the development of highly efficient and compact ion propulsion systems for pico- or nanosatellites. He has published over 80 conference and journal publications on his research. He received the Young Investigator Program Award from the Air Force and the “Future Mind” Award from Quo/The Discovery Channel. Prof. Lozano is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and member of the American Physical Society. He earned his Ph.D. in space propulsion from MIT. Previous service for the Academies includes the panel on Mitigation Strategies for Potentially Hazardous Near Earth Objects and the Panel on Prioritization of NASA Technology Roadmaps.

MALCOLM MACDONALD is a reader of space technology at the University of Strathclyde and director of the Scottish Centre of Excellence in Satellite Applications, based at the University of Strathclyde. Until 2008, he worked at SciSys (UK) Ltd. on several projects, including ADM-Aeolus and LISA-Pathfinder. His work has an end-to-end focus on development and application of space mission systems to challenge conventional ideas and advance new concepts in the exploration and exploitation of space for the betterment of life on Earth. This end-to-end philosophy enables new space-derived data product concepts through advances in space technology,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×

including new platforms concepts such as CubeSats. Specific interests are in the use of multiple spacecraft to enable new space science and services through the application of concepts from swarm engineering, combined with astrodynamics and space system design. Dr. Macdonald has received a number of awards, including the Royal Society of Edinburgh Sir Thomas Mackdougall Brisbane Medal (2016) and the Ackroyd Stuart Propulsion Price (2003) awarded by the Royal Aeronautical Society. He is currently deputy chair of the U.K. Space Agency’s Space Programme Review Panel, an associate editor of the Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and an associate fellow of the AIAA. He also has an honours degree and a Ph.D. from the University of Glasgow.

ROBYN MILLAN is an associate professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth College. Her research includes the use of high-altitude scientific balloon experiments to study Earth’s radiation belts. Dr. Millan is principal investigator for the BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation-belt Relativistic Electron Losses), which makes observations in conjunction with NASA’s Van Allen Probes to study atmospheric loss of radiation-belt electrons. Her prior positions include research appointments at Dartmouth and at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her Ph.D. in physics at the University of California, Berkeley, in 2002. Dr. Millan served on the Academies’ Committee on the Role and Scope of Mission-Enabling Activities in NASA’s Space and Earth Science Missions and on the Panel on Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Interactions for the Committee for a Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics (Heliophysics). She is currently serving as secretary for the Space Physics and Aeronomy section of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and is a member of the SSB standing Committee on Solar and Space Physics.

CHARLES D. NORTON is a program manager and principal technologist at JPL at the California Institute of Technology. He is the engineering and science directorate formulation lead for Small Satellites at JPL. His research interests are small satellites for spaceborne technology validation, high-performance computing for Earth and space science modeling, and advanced information systems technologies. He has managed CubeSat flight projects and coled a Keck Institute study “Small Satellites: A Revolution in Space Science.” He is a recipient of numerous awards for new technology and innovation, including the JPL Lew Allen Award and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and is a member of IEEE (senior level), AIAA, and AGU, holding a B.S.E. from Princeton University in electrical engineering and computer science and an M.S and a Ph.D. in computer science from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Prior to joining JPL, he was an National Research Council postdoctoral fellow.

WILLIAM H. SWARTZ is a principal research scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). He is also associate research professor at JHU. As a member of JHU/APL’s space sector, Dr. Swartz works to advance the use of remote sensing for addressing pressing science questions and to enable novel observation systems. He is the principal investigator (PI) of a NASA-funded CubeSat mission to develop technologies and measurement techniques that could significantly advance space observation of Earth’s radiation budget. He also conducts research into the response of the atmosphere’s chemistry and temperature to solar variability, using both Earth system modeling and observations. Dr. Swartz holds a Ph.D. in atmospheric chemistry from the University of Maryland, College Park, and has previously briefed the Academies’ Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space.

ALAN TITLE is a senior fellow at the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Advanced Technology Center (ATC) in Palo Alto, California. His primary scientific research interest is the generation, distribution, and effects of the solar magnetic field throughout the Sun’s interior and outer atmosphere. At present, he has 200 articles in refereed journals. He is currently the principal investigator for NASA’s solar mission called the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Title was the principal investigator responsible for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) launched in 2010, and is a coinvestigator for another instrument on SDO, the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager. He was also the principal investigator for NASA’s solar telescope on the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) mission, launched in 1998, and the Focal Plane Package on the JAXA/ISAS Hinode mission launched in 2006. Additionally, Dr. Title serves as a coinvestigator responsible for the Michelson-Doppler Imager (MDI) science instrument on the NASA-European Space Agency Solar and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×

Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), launched in 1995. All of these instruments were built under Dr. Title’s direction at the ATC. As an engineer, he designs, develops, builds, and flies new instruments that will gather the data necessary to inform his solar research interests. He led the development of tunable bandpass filters for space-based solar observations, a version of which is currently operating on the JAXA/ISAS Hinode spacecraft. He also invented a tunable variation of the Michelson Interferometer that has been employed on the SOHO spacecraft, the SDO, the Global Oscillations Network Group of the National Solar Observatory as well as other ground-based systems. Outside of his research, Dr. Title has supported activities at the Tech Museum, Chabot Observatory, Boston Museum of Science, the National Air and Space Museum, and the Hayden Planetarium. In addition, his educational outreach funding has supported a yearly summer program for Stanford undergraduates, and the Stanford Hass Center activities that develop science programs for K-12 classrooms. And for two decades, promising students from the Palo Alto High School District have come to work in his laboratory. Among his honors and awards are the 2011 John Adam Fleming Medal, awarded not more than once annually to an individual for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the California Institute of Technology. Most recently, he has served on the Academies’ Board on Research Data and Information and the NASA Technology Roadmap: Instruments and Computing Panel, and he currently serves on the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB).

THOMAS WOODS is the associate director of technical divisions of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado in Boulder. His research is focused primarily on solar irradiance variability and its effects on Earth’s atmosphere, climate change, and space weather. Dr. Woods is involved with several NASA and NOAA satellite programs. He is the PI of the TIMED SEE and SDO EVE satellite instrument programs at LASP and is also the PI of the SORCE and MinXSS CubeSat missions. He is first author on 49 papers and coauthor on 143 other papers. He obtained his B.S. in physics from Southwestern at Memphis (now Rhodes College) and his Ph.D. in physics from JHU. He previously served on the Panel on Solar and Heliospheric physics for the Academies’ decadal survey for solar and space physics (heliophysics).

EDWARD L. WRIGHT is a David Saxon Presidential Chair in Physics Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). At UCLA, Dr. Wright has been the data team leader on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), a coinvestigator on the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), an interdisciplinary scientist on the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the PI on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Dr. Wright is well-known for his Cosmology Tutorial website for the informed public, and his web-based cosmology calculator for professional astronomers. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, he has served on the Academies’ Beyond Einstein Program Assessment Committee, the committee to study Autonomy Research in Civil Aviation, and the committee to study NASA’s planned Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope—Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets program (WFIRST-AFTA). Dr. Wright currently serves on the committee for Review of the Federal Aviation Administration Research Plan on Certification of New Technologies into the National Airspace System. He earned his Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University.

A. THOMAS YOUNG is executive vice president, retired, at Lockheed Martin Corporation and former chair of the board of SAIC. Mr. Young was previously the president and chief operating officer of Martin Marietta Corporation. Prior to joining industry, Mr. Young worked for 21 years at NASA where he directed the Goddard Space Flight Center, was deputy director of the Ames Research Center, and directed the Planetary Program in the Office of Space Science at NASA Headquarters. Mr. Young received high acclaim for his technical leadership in organizing and directing national space and defense programs, especially the Viking program. He is currently an honorary fellow of the AIAA and a fellow of the American Astronautical Society. Mr. Young is a member of the NASA Advisory Council. He earned his engineering degree from the University of Virginia and M.S. in management from MIT. Mr. Young’s service for the Academies includes current membership on the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Committee on Survey of Surveys: Lessons Learned from the Decadal Survey Process. His prior Academies’ membership includes the Committee on the Assessment of the Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (AFTA) Mission Concepts, the Planning Committee on Lessons Learned in Decadal Planning in Space:

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×

A Workshop, the Committee on the Planetary Science Decadal Survey: 2013-2022, the Panel on Implementing Recommendations from New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal Survey, the Committee on the Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010, and the SSB (vice chair).

STAFF

ABIGAIL A. SHEFFER, Study Director, is a program officer for the SSB. In fall 2009, Dr. Sheffer served as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow for the National Academies and then joined the SSB. Since coming to the Academies, she has been study director on reports such as Sharing the Adventure with the Student: Exploring the Intersections of NASA Space Science and Education—A Workshop Summary, Landsat and Beyond—Sustaining and Enhancing the Nation’s Land Imaging Program, and The Effects of Solar Variability on Earth’s Climate: A Workshop Report. Dr. Sheffer has been an assisting staff officer on several other reports, including Pathways to Exploration—Rationales and Approaches for a U.S. Program of Human Space Exploration and Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society. Dr. Sheffer earned her Ph.D. in planetary science from the University of Arizona and A.B. in geosciences from Princeton University.

MICHAEL H. MOLONEY is the director for space and aeronautics at the SSB and the ASEB of the Academies. Since joining the ASEB/SSB Dr. Moloney has overseen the production of more than 60 reports, including five decadal surveys, in astronomy and astrophysics, Earth science and applications from space, planetary science, microgravity sciences, and solar and space physics. He has also been involved in reviewing of NASA’s space technology roadmaps and oversaw a major report on the rationale for and future direction of the U.S. human spaceflight program, as well as reports on issues such as NASA’s strategic direction; lessons learned from the decadal survey processes; the science promise of CubeSats; the challenge of orbital debris; the future of NASA’s astronaut corps; NASA’s aeronautical flight research program; and national research agendas for autonomy and low-carbon propulsion in civil aviation. Since joining the Academies in 2001, Dr. Moloney has also served as a study director at the National Materials Advisory Board, the Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA), the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design, and the Center for Economic, Governance, and International Studies. Dr. Moloney has served as study director or senior staff for a series of reports on subject matters as varied as quantum physics, nanotechnology, cosmology, the operation of the nation’s helium reserve, new anti-counterfeiting technologies for currency, corrosion science, and nuclear fusion. Before joining the SSB and ASEB in 2010, Dr. Moloney was associate director of the BPA and study director for the 2010 decadal survey for astronomy and astrophysics (New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics). In addition to his professional experience at the Academies, Dr. Moloney has more than 7 years’ experience as a foreign-service officer for the Irish government—including serving at Ireland’s embassy in Washington and its mission to the United Nations in New York. A physicist, Dr. Moloney did his Ph.D. work at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland. He received his undergraduate degree in experimental physics at University College Dublin, where he was awarded the Nevin Medal for Physics. Dr. Moloney is a corresponding member of the International Academy of Astronautics and a senior member of the AIAA. He is also a recipient of a distinguished service award from the Academies.

KATIE DAUD is a research associate for the SSB and the ASEB. Previously, she worked at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s Center for Earth and Planetary Studies as a planetary scientist. Ms. Daud was a triple major at Bloomsburg University, receiving a B.S. in planetary science and Earth science and a B.A. in political science.

DIONNA J. WILLIAMS is a program coordinator with the SSB, having previously worked for the Academies’ Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education for 5 years. Ms. Williams has a long career in office administration, having worked as a supervisor in a number of capacities and fields. Ms. Williams attended the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, and majored in psychology.

JAMES ALVER is a recent graduate of Harvard College with a B.A. in government and a secondary in Earth and planetary sciences. While at Harvard, he wrote for the Harvard Political Review focusing on space policy issues

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×

as well as for the humor newspaper Satire V. Mr. Alver combined his interests in space and government during time as the Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Intern at the SSB, gaining a deeper understanding of the interaction between scientists, policy makers, and industry. He hopes to use this knowledge for a career in shaping space policy.

THOMAS KATUCKI is a political science major at Grinnell College. He comes to the SSB after interning with the B612 Foundation and working on Asteroid Day in the summer. Mr. Katucki worked on a variety of projects for the board while he served as the Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Intern. He has a wide range of academics interests, ranging from international relations to astrophysics.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×
Page 110
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×
Page 111
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23503.
×
Page 112
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Space-based observations have transformed our understanding of Earth, its environment, the solar system and the universe at large. During past decades, driven by increasingly advanced science questions, space observatories have become more sophisticated and more complex, with costs often growing to billions of dollars. Although these kinds of ever-more-sophisticated missions will continue into the future, small satellites, ranging in mass between 500 kg to 0.1 kg, are gaining momentum as an additional means to address targeted science questions in a rapid, and possibly more affordable, manner. Within the category of small satellites, CubeSats have emerged as a space-platform defined in terms of (10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm)- sized cubic units of approximately 1.3 kg each called “U’s.” Historically, CubeSats were developed as training projects to expose students to the challenges of real-world engineering practices and system design. Yet, their use has rapidly spread within academia, industry, and government agencies both nationally and internationally.

In particular, CubeSats have caught the attention of parts of the U.S. space science community, which sees this platform, despite its inherent constraints, as a way to affordably access space and perform unique measurements of scientific value. The first science results from such CubeSats have only recently become available; however, questions remain regarding the scientific potential and technological promise of CubeSats in the future.

Achieving Science with CubeSats reviews the current state of the scientific potential and technological promise of CubeSats. This report focuses on the platform’s promise to obtain high- priority science data, as defined in recent decadal surveys in astronomy and astrophysics, Earth science and applications from space, planetary science, and solar and space physics (heliophysics); the science priorities identified in the 2014 NASA Science Plan; and the potential for CubeSats to advance biology and microgravity research. It provides a list of sample science goals for CubeSats, many of which address targeted science, often in coordination with other spacecraft, or use “sacrificial,” or high-risk, orbits that lead to the demise of the satellite after critical data have been collected. Other goals relate to the use of CubeSats as constellations or swarms deploying tens to hundreds of CubeSats that function as one distributed array of measurements.

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