National Academies Press: OpenBook

A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education (2016)

Chapter: Appendix C: Workshop Agendas

« Previous: Appendix B: Briefers to the Study Committee
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×

C

Workshop Agendas

APRIL 30, 2014
NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
WASHINGTON, D.C.

The goal for this workshop is to gain an understanding of the need for cyber physical systems workers, the impact of CPS on various sectors, core skills and knowledge, and educational barriers. Questions include:

  • What are CPS, and how does it relate to engineering, computer science, and other related disciplines?
  • What role do CPS play in sustaining innovation and supporting U.S. competitiveness and economic growth?
  • What sorts of jobs require CPS knowledge and skills? (e.g., engineering design, test and evaluation, operations)
  • Where does one find this talent today? How much of the needed knowledge and skills are covered in undergraduate degree programs or graduate education? How much on-the-job training is required?
  • What are the core knowledge areas, capabilities, and skills that individuals working in CPS-intensive fields need? How do they map onto traditional undergraduate degree programs and courses in engineering and computer science? What areas are covered in graduate programs and courses?
  • Where are there gaps in courses, textbooks and other course materials, teaching tools, curricula, and degree programs?
  • What are the barriers in the educational pipeline to developing needed CPS knowledge, skills, and capabilities?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
8:30 a.m. Introduction and Welcome
Jack Stankovic, University of Virginia, Co-Chair
Jim Sturges, Lockheed Martin (retired), Co-Chair
8:45 The Importance of Cyber Physical Systems
Moderator: Jack Stankovic

Panelists: David Corman, National Science Foundation
Janos Sztipanovits, Vanderbilt University [remotely]
Joe Salvo, GE Research

  • What are CPS, and how does it relate to engineering, computer science, and other related disciplines?
  • What are some of the key applications of CPS? How do CPS help advance economically or societally important capabilities?
  • What sectors will depend most on CPS-enabled capabilities?
  • What role do CPS play in sustaining innovation and supporting U.S. competitiveness and economic growth?
10:00 Break
10:15 Current and Anticipated Workforce Needs
Moderator: Bill Milam

Panelists: Dick Bulterman, FXPAL
Lucio Soibelman, University of Southern California Craig Stephens, Ford Research and Advanced Engineering
Jon Williams, John Deere

  • What sorts of jobs require CPS knowledge and skills? (e.g., engineering design, test and evaluation, operations)
  • Where does one find this talent today? How much of the needed knowledge and skills are covered in undergraduate degree
  • programs or graduate education? How much on-the-job training is required?
  • What are expectations for the future size of the CPS workforce, in total or as a share of total positions?
  • How important is it to have a workforce of sufficient capacity and capability?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
12:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 Knowledge, Capabilities, and Skills Needed in a CPS Workforce
Moderator: Insup Lee

Panelists: Dan Johnson, Honeywell [remotely]
Kevin Massey, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
John Mills, SimuQuest
Sanjai Rayadurgam, University of Minnesota
Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, University of California, Berkeley

Each sector deploying cyber-physical systems has tended to work independently of others in developing the necessary science, engineering, workplace skills, and regulatory approach—reflecting in part the historically modest “cyber content” of most systems and organic efforts to solve the problems at hand. Today, there is growing interest in seeking advances with common application in science and engineering (including scientific and engineering principles, algorithms, models, and theories); tools (including programming languages and tools for reasoning about the properties of CPS); and building blocks (innovative hardware and software components, infrastructure, and platforms).

  • What knowledge and skills are common across sectors? What are sector-specific?
  • What are the core knowledge areas, capabilities, and skills that individuals working in CPS-intensive fields need? How do they map onto traditional undergraduate degree programs and courses in engineering and computer science?
  • What areas are covered in graduate programs and courses?
  • Where are there gaps between what is taught and what employers need?
  • How do employees lacking needed knowledge or skills acquire them? How do employers provide these education and training opportunities to their employers?
2:30 Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
2:45 Challenges and Opportunities in CPS Education
Moderator: Sanjoy Mitter

Panelists: Alex Bayen, University of California, Berkeley
Ryan Izard, Clemson University
George Pappas, University of Pennsylvania

To make progress in the CPS education pipeline, it will be important to understand the nature of current barriers and to develop strategies to overcome them. One challenge is the multidisciplinary character of educational foundations for CPS literacy. Looking across computer science, electrical engineering, and other engineering disciplines will be critical. Moreover, the audience for education in CPS is not found only in a traditional academic context where disciplines and knowledge are relatively settled. The challenges also include re-educating today’s faculty, devising new preparation paths for university computer science and engineering students, upgrading K-12 teachers and the K-12 pipeline, as well as the existing workforce. New modalities for lab-centric, team-taught, and online education are emerging, which merit investigation as potential tools for accelerating progress toward a more CPS-capable workforce and society.

  • Where are there gaps in courses, textbooks and other course materials, teaching tools, curricula, and degree programs?
  • What initiatives are underway to address perceived gaps? How can we assess their impact?
  • What are some of the obstacles that need to be overcome? Can courses and programs be realigned as needed? Do we have the
  • faculty needed to teach CPS material?
  • Does our K-12 educational system provide the necessary foundation for later CPS education and work?
  • What are the barriers in the educational pipeline to developing needed CPS knowledge, skills, and capabilities?
  • What are some current programs/projects that are being developed to address these challenges?
4:00 Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
4:15 Summary and Discussion Moderator: Jim Sturges

Panelists: Chuck Farrar, Los Alamos Laboratories
Himanshu Khurana, Honeywell International
Paulo Tabuada, University of California, Los Angeles

5:30 Adjourn

OCTOBER 2-3, 2014
NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
WASHINGTON, D.C.

The first workshop focused on identifying CPS educational requirements. This workshop is focused on identifying solutions. Questions examined include:

  • Would there be a CPS engineer? Would there be a major in CPS? If it’s run out of an ECE department, what would it look like? If it was run out of a CS department, what would it look like? Should it not be run out of a single department? Should it be run out of more complicated, coordinated multidisciplinary departments?
  • Should it just be the four-year electives, so it’s kind of a concentration rather than a whole major?
  • What happens in an aerospace department or a mechanical or civil engineering or chemical?
  • What should we be doing in community colleges, if anything, or high schools or K-12?

October 2, 2014

9:00 a.m. Introduction and Welcome
Jack Stankovic, University of Virginia, Co-Chair
Jim Sturges, Lockheed Martin (retired), Co-Chair
9:30 Current and Anticipated Workforce Needs
Presenter: Scott Hareland, Medtronics
10:00 Break
10:00 Innovative Trends in Engineering Education

Presenter: Norman Fortenberry, American Society for Engineering Education

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
11:00 Incorporating CPS Knowledge into Existing Engineering Curricula
Moderator: George Pappas
—Civil Engineering

Presenter: Douglas Adams, Chair, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University

—Aerospace

Presenter: Jonathan How, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

12:00 p.m. Lunch Breakout Sessions
  1. Envisioning an undergraduate degree program in CPS: What knowledge and course work would make up a CPS degree program? How much of this course work is new versus existing courses? What course work might be displaced by CPS-centric courses?
  2. Discipline-centric CPS knowledge: How will CPS be incorporated into existing disciplines, such as civil or aerospace engineering?
  3. Engineering- and CS-wide core knowledge: What core knowledge in CPS should be a part of all engineering and computer science curriculum? What course work might be displaced by CPS-centric course work?
2:00 Teaching Courses for CPS
Presenter: André DeHon, University of Pennsylvania
  • How will courses taught for CPS differ from course taught to a more general audience (i.e. classic control course verse control course for CPS)?
2:15 Including CPS Core Knowledge into General Engineering Education

Presenter: Shankar Sastry, University of California, Berkeley [remotely]

3:15 CPS Outside/Beyond 4-year Degree Programs
Moderator: Bill Milam
—Introducing CPS in High School

Presenter: Harry Cheng, University of California, Davis

—Online Education/MOOCS

Presenter: Magnus Egerstedt, Georgia Tech

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
4:30 Critical Knowledge: Lessons from Teaching a Course and Writing a Textbook

Presenter: Edward Lee, University of California Berkeley [remotely]

5:30 Reception

October 3, 2014

8:30 a.m. Teaching for CPS (continued)
Moderator: Manuela Veloso

Panelists: Trek Abdelzaher, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Henning Schulzrinne, Columbia University

  • How will courses taught for CPS differ from course taught to a more general audience (i.e., classic control course verse control course for CPS)?
9:15 Building Current and Future Faculty
Moderator: Paulo Tabuada

Panelists: Jerry Lynch, University of Michigan
Philip Koopman, Carnegie Mellon University
Christopher Gill, Washington University

  • How do we create the teaching and research capacity needed to support CPS education?
  • What are barriers to hiring faculty for CPS?
  • What other resources are needed to support CPS education?
10:15 Break
10:30 Breakout Group Report Back
11:00 Industry Exposure, Research Projects, and
Moderator: Chuck Farrar
Project-Based Learning

Panelists: Dimitri Mavris, Georgia Institute of Technology
Clas Jacobson, United Technologies Corporation
Steve Anton, Tennessee Technological University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
  • How do we measure and document the value of extracurricular activities?
  • How to best incorporate project-based learning curriculum into degree programs?
  • What is the role of industry-academic partnerships, co-ops, and internships?
12:30 p.m. Wrap Up Discussion
Jack Stankovic, University of Virginia, Co-Chair
Jim Sturges, Lockheed Martin (retired), Co-Chair
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23686.
×
Page 92
A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $50.00 Buy Ebook | $39.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are “engineered systems that are built from, and depend upon, the seamless integration of computational algorithms and physical components.” CPS can be small and closed, such as an artificial pancreas, or very large, complex, and interconnected, such as a regional energy grid. CPS engineering focuses on managing inter- dependencies and impact of physical aspects on cyber aspects, and vice versa. With the development of low-cost sensing, powerful embedded system hardware, and widely deployed communication networks, the reliance on CPS for system functionality has dramatically increased. These technical developments in combination with the creation of a workforce skilled in engineering CPS will allow the deployment of increasingly capable, adaptable, and trustworthy systems.

Engineers responsible for developing CPS but lacking the appropriate education or training may not fully understand at an appropriate depth, on the one hand, the technical issues associated with the CPS software and hardware or, on the other hand, techniques for physical system modeling, energy and power, actuation, signal processing, and control. In addition, these engineers may be designing and implementing life-critical systems without appropriate formal training in CPS methods needed for verification and to assure safety, reliability, and security.

A workforce with the appropriate education, training, and skills will be better positioned to create and manage the next generation of CPS solutions. A 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education examines the intellectual content of the emerging field of CPS and its implications for engineering and computer science education. This report is intended to inform those who might support efforts to develop curricula and materials; faculty and university administrators; industries with needs for CPS workers; and current and potential students about intellectual foundations, workforce requirements, employment opportunities, and curricular needs.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!