National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×

Appendix B

Speaker Biographies

Ellen Anderson is the director of radiation safety and international liaison in occupational radiation protection for the Nuclear Energy Institute. She has more than 35 years of experience in occupational radiation protection. Ms. Anderson is a member of the Health Physics Society and the World Nuclear Association Radiation Protection Working Group and is a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency on several occupational radiation protection topics.

Armin Ansari is the Radiological Assessment Team Lead at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has led the development of key national guidance documents, including guides for population monitoring and operation of public shelters after radiation emergencies. He is a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and serves as a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

Michael Boyd is the acting director of the Center for Science and Technology in the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Radiation Protection Division. At EPA, he managed the development of a series of federal guidance reports related to radiation dose and risk assessment. Mr. Boyd is a member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. He currently chairs the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency’s Committee on Radiation Protec-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×

tion and Public Health and the U.S. Health Physics Society’s International Collaboration Committee.

Frazier Bronson is the scientific director at Canberra Industries based in Meriden, Connecticut. He has 50 years of experience measuring most kinds of radioactivity and radiation and designing instruments for others. He is past chairman of the American Board of Health Physics and the American Academy of Health Physics and is a fellow of the Health Physics Society.

Peter H. Burgess worked at the National Radiological Protection Board in the United Kingdom from 1975 to 2002. He then joined the U.K. Atomic Energy Authority for 4 years, where he focused on decommissioning and delicensing, followed by 2 years as head of science for the Radioactivity and Neutrons group at the National Physical Laboratory. He then held positions at Nuvia, a commercial company, and is now at Radiation Metrology, Ltd., where he advises clients in Europe, North America, and the United Kingdom on radiation detection and measurement. He spearheaded the development of the United Kingdom’s approach to instrument statutory testing and has worked regularly for the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Joseph J. Cordes is director of the School of Public Policy and Public Administration and professor of economics, public policy and public administration, and international affairs. His academic specialization in economics is in public economics and policy analysis. He has been a consultant to the Washington, DC, Tax Revision Commission; the RAND Corporation; and numerous government agencies, including the Congressional Budget Office, the Internal Revenue Service Office of Research, the Department of the Treasury, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. His current research focuses on the economics of nonprofit organizations, comparative analysis of welfare state institutions, U.S. tax policy, and the application of benefit–cost analysis to evaluating the economic effects of public policies intended to mitigate risks from natural hazards and terrorist attacks.

Col. John Cuellar has more than 26 years of experience as an Army health physicist in both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. He coaches various soccer teams and is also a certified soccer referee. He is currently the Health Physics Program Manager for the Army Public Health Center.

Nicholas Dainiak is the medical and technical director of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site. His areas of expertise are in medical management of radiation injury and radiation biodosimetry for individual whole-body dose assessment. He maintains an academic ap-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×

pointment as clinical professor at the Yale University School of Medicine. He serves on committees, working groups, and task forces for the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and others.

Sara DeCair is a health physicist with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Radiation and Indoor Air. She works on policy, planning, training, and outreach for the EPA’s radiological emergency preparedness and response program. She is the project and technical lead for revising the Protective Action Guides.

Paul M. DeLuca, Jr., is provost emeritus at University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison. During his career, his research interests concentrated on fast neutron dosimetry, including the production of intense sources of fast neutrons, determination of elemental neutron kerma coefficients, and applications of microdosimetry to radiation dosimetry. He is currently a member and vice chairman of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements and serves as a board member and treasurer for the Hertz Foundation.

Alan Du Sautoy is the director of the Radiation and Health Sciences Division at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. He has contributed to various national and international organizations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency, EURAMET (European Association of National Metrology Institutes), and EURADOS (European Radiation Dosimetry Group).

Willie Harris is the director of radiation protection and the corporate radiation protection manager for Exelon Nuclear. He has more than 35 years of nuclear power plant experience and 17 years of experience in management of radiation protection programs.

Matt Heavner serves as the assistant director for Global Security at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s National Security and International Affairs Division in the Executive Office of the President. Dr. Heavner holds a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He is a scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, with broad interest in nuclear nonproliferation and security, radio remote sensing, lightning science, glaciology, and climate.

Steven H. King is the director of health physics at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. He serves as an associate editor of the Health Physics Journal/ Operational Radiation Safety and is a co-editor for the medical and dental section of the Health Physics Society “Ask the Expert” website. Dr. King is

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×

also a member of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the Laser Institute of America.

Rajah Mena manages the Consequence Management program at the Remote Sensing Laboratory—Nellis in Las Vegas, Nevada, which supports the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center. Since supporting the Department of Energy in its response to Fukushima in 2011, she has participated in a number of international activities, including delivering training courses, observing international exercises, and supporting bilateral working groups.

Marc S. Mendonca is a professor and director of radiation and cancer biology in the departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical and Molecular Genetics at Indiana University School of Medicine. Since 2011, Dr. Mendonca has also served as editor-in-chief of the respected international journal Radiation Research.

Fred Mettler is professor emeritus and former chair of the Department of Radiology at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. Dr. Mettler has authored more than 350 scientific publications, including 20 books, and holds 4 patents. He was the U.S. representative to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, an emeritus commissioner of the International Commission on Radiation Protection, and a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection.

Ronaldo Minniti is a physicist in the Radiation Physics Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He performs radiation dosimetry measurements with high accuracy in X-rays and gamma-ray beams. Within the Dosimetry Group, he maintains and disseminates the national standard for air kerma and absorbed dose to water from 137Cs and 60Co gamma-ray beams for applications in radiation protection and the medical field.

Stefan Mundigl is a policy officer at the Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Unit of the Directorate General Energy of the European Commission. He is responsible for the European Commission’s activities related to the EURATOM (European Atomic Energy Community) Basic Safety Standards, which also covers the Commission’s programs in occupational radiation protection and radiation protection education and training. He acts as scientific secretary of the Group of Experts referred to in Article 31 of the EURATOM Treaty, which is a scientific advisory committee to the Commission.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×

Stephen Musolino is a scientist in the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Brookhaven National Laboratory. Since 1981, he has been part of the DOE Radiological Assistance Program as a team captain/team scientist and has been involved in developing radiological emergency response plans and procedures. During the Fukushima crisis, he was deployed in Japan as an assessment scientist with the DOE response team that was measuring the environmental consequences of the radioactive material released from the damaged nuclear power plants.

William C. Ostendorff, was a two-term Commissioner of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). At the NRC, Commissioner Ostendorff was a strong proponent of regulatory technical competence. He was considered by many to be a key leader on the Commission in the areas of post-Fukushima regulatory decision making and in both physical and cybersecurity of commercial nuclear facilities. Before joining the NRC, Mr. Ostendorff served as the director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy and as director of the Board on Global Science and Technology at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He is currently a professor at the U.S. Naval Academy.

Alexis Reed is a team member and manager for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration nuclear incident response teams deployed from the Remote Sensing Laboratory at Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas, Nevada. She is a team leader for the federal Consequence Management, Nuclear/Radiological Advisory Team and Aerial Measuring System response assets. For this workshop, Ms. Reed represented the Counter Terrorism Operations Support program, a member of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Domestic Preparedness Consortium.

Lt. Col. Ricardo Reyes has more than 20 years of experience in the field of nuclear and medical physics. Lt. Col. Reyes’ expertise is in radiation dosimetry and most of his published work is in biodosimetry. Lt. Col. Reyes is one of the subject-matter experts in chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) defense and threats. He is now at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office. Lt. Col. Reyes is a full member of the Health Physics Society, the American Nuclear Society, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the American College of Radiology. He volunteers at local schools and several charities.

David Ropeik is an instructor at Harvard University, author, and consultant on the psychology of risk perception, risk communication, and risk man-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×

agement. Mr. Ropeik was a television reporter for WCVB-TV in Boston from 1978 to 2000, where he specialized in reporting on environmental and science issues. He twice won the DuPont-Columbia Award and seven regional Emmy awards.

Steven L. Simon is a radiation physicist and head of the Dosimetry Unit of the Radiation Epidemiology Branch of the National Cancer Institute, which provides dose estimation in support of branch epidemiological studies and develops exposure assessment methods to improve the science of dosimetry. He was deployed to the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo during the Fukushima nuclear crisis in 2011, where he served as a Department of Health and Human Services technical expert in radiation dose and risk for the purposes of protecting American citizens in Japan. Dr. Simon is a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and has been an associate editor of Health Physics for 23 years.

Bliss Tracy retired in 2010 from Health Canada where he carried out many projects on the health assessment of environmental radioactivity. These included the impact of uranium mining and refining, the effects of radioactive fallout on Arctic ecosystems, nuclear emergency planning, nuclear waste disposal, technical support for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and the revision of the radon guideline for Canadian homes. Since his retirement from Health Canada, Dr. Tracy has been involved in consulting and training for the purposes of radiation protection.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24645.
×
Page 64
Next: Appendix C: Planning Committee Member Biographies »
Adopting the International System of Units for Radiation Measurements in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $44.00 Buy Ebook | $35.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Most countries in the world use the SI (Système International, also known as the metric system) units for radiation measurements in commercial and technical activities. The United States, in contrast, uses a mix of SI and conventional units for radiation measurements, despite 30-year-old national and international recommendations to exclusively use SI. Radiation professionals in the United States are faced with the need to understand both systems and make conversions between the two.

In September 2016, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine organized a workshop to explore potential communication improvements associated with adopting the international system of units (SI units) for radiation measurements in the United States. Participants discussed potential improvements in the effectiveness of responding to national and international radiation emergencies, international experiences in adopting the exclusive use of SI units of radiation measurements, and steps needed to adopt the exclusive use of SI units in the US in terms of timing, implementation, and ways to overcome or manage technical, economic, and policy barriers. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!