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Application of Systematic Review Methods in an Overall Strategy for Evaluating Low-Dose Toxicity from Endocrine Active Chemicals (2017)

Chapter: Appendix A: Biosketches of the Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of the Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Application of Systematic Review Methods in an Overall Strategy for Evaluating Low-Dose Toxicity from Endocrine Active Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24758.
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Appendix A

Biosketches of the Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity

David C. Dorman (Chair) is a professor of toxicology in the Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences at North Carolina State University. Dr. Dorman’s research interests include neurotoxicology, nasal toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and cognition and olfaction in animals. He has chaired or served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees and is a National Associate of the NRC. He has served on other advisory boards for the US Navy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the US Department of Agriculture, and is a former member of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Board of Scientific Counselors. Dr. Dorman is an elected fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences. He received a DVM from Colorado State University. He completed a combined PhD and veterinary toxicology residency program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and is a diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology and the American Board of Toxicology.

Weihsueh Chiu is a professor in the Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M University. Before joining the university, he worked at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for more than 14 years, most recently as chief of the Toxicity Pathways Branch in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Division of the National Center for Environmental Assessment. His research has focused on human health risk assessment, particularly with respect to toxicokinetics, mechanisms of toxicity, physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling, dose-response assessment, and characterizing uncertainty and variability. Dr. Chiu led the development of the EPA’s 2011 IRIS assessment of trichloroethylene, which pioneered the use of probabilistic methods for characterizing uncertainty and variability in toxicokinetics and dose response. He was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures. Dr. Chiu received a PhD in physics from Princeton University.

Barbara F. Hales is a James McGill Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics at McGill University. Her research interests are in the mechanisms of action of drugs as teratogens. She studies developmental toxicity using a combination of in vivo, in vitro, and molecular approaches with the goal of elucidating how the embryo responds to insult after direct or maternal exposure and the consequences to progeny of paternal drug exposure. Dr. Hales is a past president of the Teratology Society and is currently co-chair of the Chemicals Management Plan Science Committee of the Government of Canada. She received an MSc in pharmacognosy from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science and a PhD in pharmacology and therapeutics from McGill University.

Russ B. Hauser is the Frederick Lee Hisaw Professor of Reproductive Physiology and professor of environmental and occupational epidemiology in the Department of Environmental Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He also holds an appointment at the Harvard Medical School, where he is professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology. Dr. Hauser’s research focuses on the health risks posed by exposure to environmental chemicals that adversely affect human development and reproductive health. He has served on several NRC and Institute of Medicine committees, including the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of the Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Application of Systematic Review Methods in an Overall Strategy for Evaluating Low-Dose Toxicity from Endocrine Active Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24758.
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Committee to Review EPA’s State of the Science Paper on Nonmonotonic Dose Response and the Committee on the Health Risks of Phthalates. Dr. Hauser is a member of two EPA Science Advisory Boards. He served on the US Consumer Product Safety Commission’s Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel examining the effects of phthalates on children’s health. He received an MD from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and an MPH and a ScD from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Kamin J. Johnson is a lead scientist for The Dow Chemical Company’s Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting function, responsible for the scientific conduct and interpretation of developmental and reproductive toxicology studies. He has served on study sections of the National Institutes of Health reviewing reproductive toxicology grants, and he was a counselor for the Reproductive and Toxicology Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology. His research interests are in the molecular and cellular biology of fetal and postnatal testis function, as well as mechanisms of testicular toxicants. Dr. Johnson received a PhD in molecular biology, cell biology, and biochemistry from Brown University.

Karen A. Robinson is an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She also serves as director of the Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center and is a member of the core faculty in the Center for Clinical Trials and Evidence Synthesis at the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Robinson’s research focuses on evidence-based health care and evidence-based research. She conducts systematic reviews that are used to develop clinical practice guideline and to inform other health decisions. Dr. Robinson received an MSc in health sciences from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, and a PhD in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Andrew A. Rooney is deputy director of the Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) in the National Toxicology Program at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). He has been developing risk assessment methods and guidance throughout his professional career and is a principal author of the 2012 World Health Organization/International Programme on Chemical Safety Guidance for Immunotoxicity Risk Assessment for Chemicals. Most recently, Dr. Rooney has been working on emerging issues in toxicology and environmental health, including methods to address study quality in terms of risk of bias for human, animal, and mechanistic studies and adaptation of systematic review methods for addressing environmental health questions. He led the team that developed the OHAT approach to systematic review. Dr. Rooney has an MS and a PhD in zoology from the University of Florida.

Ruthann Rudel is director of research at the Silent Spring Institute, an independent not-for-profit environmental research organization focused on women’s health. She leads the exposure and toxicology research program focusing on endocrine active chemicals and on mechanisms by which chemicals may influence breast cancer. Ms. Rudel’s work in toxicology includes a review of early life exposure to chemicals that alter mammary gland development and implications for testing protocols and risk assessment. She also has an appointment as a research associate in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Brown University. Ms. Rudel was a member of the National Toxicology Program’s Board of Scientific Counselors and of the Society of Toxicology’s Regulatory Affairs and Legislative Assistance Committee. She received an MS in environmental management and policy from Tufts University.

Sheela Sathyanarayana is an associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics and an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the University of Washington. She is also an attending physician at Harborview Medical Center and Seattle Children’s Hospital. Her research interests focus on exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals, including phthalates and bisphenol A, and their effects on reproductive development. Currently, Dr. Sathyanarayana is the center director and clinical director for The Infant Development and Environment Study, which is a multicenter cohort study of phthalate exposures in pregnancy and health outcomes in children. She is a former chair of the EPA’s Children’s Health Protection Advisory Committee. Dr. Sathyanarayana earned

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of the Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Application of Systematic Review Methods in an Overall Strategy for Evaluating Low-Dose Toxicity from Endocrine Active Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24758.
×

an MD from the University of Southern California and an MPH in epidemiology from the University of Washington.

Susan L. Schantz is a professor of toxicology in the Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is also director of a NIEHS T32 training program in endocrine, developmental, and reproductive toxicology and director of a Children’s Environmental Health Research Center jointly funded by the NIEHS and the EPA. In addition, she is currently the interim director of the Neuroscience Program. Dr. Schantz’s research interests involve understanding the neurobehavioral effects of chemical exposures during development and aging. She conducts research in both laboratory-based animal studies and parallel epidemiologic studies. She has served as president of the Neurotoxicology Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology and president of the Neurobehavioral Teratology Society. Dr. Schantz was also a member of the NRC’s Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion. She received a PhD in environmental toxicology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Katrina Waters is deputy director of the Biological Sciences Division at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Her research interests are focused on the integration of genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and high-throughput screening data to enable predictive mechanistic modeling of disease and toxicity pathways. She has served on the EPA’s Board of Scientific Counselors Subcommittee on Chemical Safety for Sustainability and the US Food and Drug Administration’s Scientific Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research. She served on the NRC’s Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures. Dr. Waters received a PhD in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and did a postdoctoral fellowship on endocrine disruptors at the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of the Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Application of Systematic Review Methods in an Overall Strategy for Evaluating Low-Dose Toxicity from Endocrine Active Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24758.
×
Page 163
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of the Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Application of Systematic Review Methods in an Overall Strategy for Evaluating Low-Dose Toxicity from Endocrine Active Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24758.
×
Page 164
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of the Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Application of Systematic Review Methods in an Overall Strategy for Evaluating Low-Dose Toxicity from Endocrine Active Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24758.
×
Page 165
Next: Appendix B: Workshop on Potential Case Studies for Unraveling Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity »
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To safeguard public health, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must keep abreast of new scientific information and emerging technologies so that it can apply them to regulatory decision-making. For decades the agency has dealt with questions about what animal-testing data to use to make predictions about human health hazards, how to perform dose-response extrapolations, how to identify and protect susceptible subpopulations, and how to address uncertainties. As alternatives to traditional toxicity testing have emerged, the agency has been faced with additional questions about how to incorporate data from such tests into its chemical assessments and whether such tests can replace some traditional testing methods.

Endocrine active chemicals (EACs) have raised concerns that traditional toxicity-testing protocols might be inadequate to identify all potential hazards to human health because they have the ability to modulate normal hormone function, and small alterations in hormone concentrations, particularly during sensitive life stages, can have lasting and significant effects. To address concerns about potential human health effects from EACs at low doses, this report develops a strategy to evaluate the evidence for such low-dose effects.

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