National Academies Press: OpenBook

How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures (2018)

Chapter: Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
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Appendix B

List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press

This bibliography consists of reports related to the 2000 National Research Council report, How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition, and prepared under the auspices of the National Research Council, the Institute of Medicine, or the new combined title, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. It was prepared by conducting a word search on the National Academies Press Website (www.nap.edu) using the following keywords:

21st century skills

Influence of culture on learning

Adolescent education/learning

Learning disabilities

Adult education/learning

Learning in academic domains (mathematics, science, literacy)

Assessment of learning

Motivation for learning

Cognitive neuroscience of learning

STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics)

Early childhood education

Teacher quality

English language learners

Technology in education

Informal learning

Dates of publication included in the bibliography are 1999–2016. The search results for each word string are listed below.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
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21st Century Skills

  1. National Research Council. (2010). Exploring the intersection of science education and 21st century skills: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  2. National Research Council. (2011). Assessing 21st century skills: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  3. National Research Council. (2012). Education for life and work: Developing transferable knowledge and skills in the 21st century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Adolescent Education/Learning

  1. National Research Council. (1999). High stakes: Testing for tracking, promotion, and graduation. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/6336.
  2. National Research Council. (2000). Mathematics education in the middle grades: Teaching to meet the needs of middle grades learners and to maintain high expectations: Proceedings of a National Convocation and Action Conferences. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/9764.
  3. National Research Council. (2002). Learning and understanding: Improving advanced study of mathematics and science in U.S. high schools. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10129.
  4. National Research Council. (2003). Engaging schools: Fostering high school students’ motivation to learn. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10421.
  5. National Research Council. (2005a). America’s lab report: Investigations in high school science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/11311.
  6. National Research Council. (2005b). How students learn: History in the classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/11100.
  7. National Research Council. (2006). ICT fluency and high schools: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/11709.
  8. National Research Council. (2009). Strengthening high school chemistry education through teacher outreach programs: A workshop summary to the chemical sciences roundtable. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12533.
  9. National Research Council. (2011a). High school dropout, graduation, and completion rates: Better data, better measures, better decisions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13035.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
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  1. National Research Council. (2011b). Incentives and test-based accountability in education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12521.
  2. Institute of Medicine. (2013). Educating the student body: Taking physical activity and physical education to school. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18314.
  3. Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. (2014). Building capacity to reduce bullying: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18762.
  4. National Research Council. (2001). Understanding dropouts: Statistics, strategies, and high-stakes testing. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  5. National Research Council. (2006). A study of interactions: Emerging issues in the science of adolescence workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  6. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (1999). Adolescent decision making: Implications for prevention programs: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  7. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2000). Afterschool programs that promote child and adolescent development: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Adult Education/Learning

  1. National Research Council. (2002a). The knowledge economy and postsecondary education: Report of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10239.
  2. National Research Council. (2002b). Performance assessments for adult education: Exploring the measurement issues: Report of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10366.
  3. National Research Council. (2012). Improving adult literacy instruction: Supporting learning and motivation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13469.
  4. Institute of Medicine. (2010). Redesigning continuing education in the health professions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12704.

Assessment of Learning

  1. National Research Council. (1999). The assessment of science meets the science of assessment: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/9588.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
  1. National Research Council. (2000a). Grading the nation’s report card: Research from the evaluation of NAEP. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/9751.
  2. National Research Council. (2000b). Inquiry and the national science education standards: A guide for teaching and learning. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/9596.
  3. National Research Council. (2001a). Classroom assessment and the national science education standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/9847.
  4. National Research Council. (2001b). Knowing what students know: The science and design of educational assessment. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/10019.
  5. National Research Council. (2002). Performance assessments for adult education: Exploring the measurement issues: Report of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10366.
  6. National Research Council. (2003). Assessment in support of instruction and learning: Bridging the gap between large-scale and classroom assessment—workshop report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10802.
  7. National Research Council. (2004). Keeping score for all: The effects of inclusion and accommodation policies on large-scale educational assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/11029.
  8. National Research Council. (2005). Systems for state science assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/11312.
  9. National Research Council. (2008). Early childhood assessment: Why, what, and how. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12446.
  10. National Research Council. (2010). State assessment systems: Exploring best practices and innovations: Summary of two workshops. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13013.
  11. National Research Council. (2012). Improving adult literacy instruction: Developing reading and writing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13468.
  12. National Research Council. (2015). Guide to implementing the next generation science standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18802.
  13. National Academy of Engineering. (2009). Developing metrics for assessing engineering instruction: What gets measured is what gets improved. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12636.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
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Cognitive Neuroscience of Learning

  1. Institute of Medicine. (2015). The neuroscience of gaming: Workshop in brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21695.

Early Childhood Education

  1. National Research Council. (1999). Improving student learning: A strategic plan for education research and its utilization. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/6488.
  2. National Research Council. (2002). Minority students in special and gifted education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10128.
  3. Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. (2005). Mathematical and scientific development in early childhood: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  4. Institute of Medicine. (2009). Strengthening benefit-cost analysis for early childhood interventions: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12777.
  5. Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. (2012). The early childhood care and education workforce: Challenges and opportunities: A workshop report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13238.
  6. Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. (2014). The cost of inaction for young children globally: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18845.
  7. Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. (2015a). Financing investments in young children globally: Summary of a joint workshop by the Institute of Medicine, National Research Council, and the Centre for Early Childhood Education and Development, Ambedkar University, Delhi. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18993.
  8. Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. (2015b). Scaling program investments for young children globally: Evidence from Latin America and the Caribbean: Workshop in brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21748.
  9. Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. (2015c). Transforming the workforce for children birth through age 8: A unifying foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/19401.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
  1. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2015). Using existing platforms to integrate and coordinate investments for children: Summary of a joint workshop by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Centre for Health Education and Health Promotion; and Wu Yee Sun College of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21799.
  2. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016a). Moving from evidence to implementation of early childhood programs: Proceedings of a workshop—in brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23669.
  3. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016b). Reaching and investing in children at the margins: Summary of a joint workshop by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Open Society Foundations; and the International Step by Step Association (ISSA). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23491.
  4. National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering. (2009). Nurturing and sustaining effective programs in science education for grades K-8: Building a village in California: Summary of a convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  5. National Research Council. (1999). Starting out right: A guide to promoting children’s reading success. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  6. National Research Council. (2000). Eager to learn: Educating our preschoolers. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  7. National Research Council. (2001a). Adding it up: Helping children learn mathematics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  8. National Research Council. (2001b). Early childhood development and learning: New knowledge for policy. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  9. National Research Council. (2007a). Ready, set, science!: Putting research to work in K-8 science classrooms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  10. National Research Council. (2007b). Taking science to school: Learning and teaching science in grades K-8. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  11. National Research Council. (2008). Early childhood assessment: Why, what, and how. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  12. National Research Council. (2009). Mathematics learning in early childhood: Paths toward excellence and equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
  1. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2000). Afterschool programs that promote child and adolescent development: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

English Language Learners

  1. National Research Council. (1999). High stakes: Testing for tracking, promotion, and graduation. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/6336.
  2. National Research Council. (2000). Testing English-language learners in U.S. schools: Report and workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/9998.
  3. National Research Council. (2002). Reporting test results for students with disabilities and English-language learners: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10410.
  4. National Research Council. (2003). Measuring access to learning opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10673.
  5. National Research Council. (2010). Language diversity, school learning, and closing achievement gaps: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12907.
  6. National Research Council. (2011a). Allocating federal funds for state programs for English language learners. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13090.
  7. National Research Council. (2011b). High school dropout, graduation, and completion rates: Better data, better measures, better decisions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13035.
  8. National Research Council. (2012). Improving adult literacy instruction: Options for practice and research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13242.
  9. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016). Speech and language disorders in children: Implications for the Social Security Administration’s supplemental security income program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21872.
  10. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2015). The integration of immigrants into American society. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21746.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
  1. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016). Integrating health literacy, cultural competence, and language access services: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23498.

Influence of Culture on Learning

  1. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016). Barriers and opportunities for 2-year and 4-year STEM degrees: Systemic change to support students’ diverse pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21739.
  2. National Research Council. (2003). We’re friends, right? Inside kids’ culture. Washington, DC: Joseph Henry Press. doi:10.17226/10723.

Informal Learning

  1. National Research Council. (2015). Identifying and supporting productive STEM programs in out-of-school settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21740.
  2. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016). Effective chemistry communication in informal environments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21790.
  3. National Research Council. (2009). Learning science in informal environments: People, places, and pursuits. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  4. National Research Council. (2010). Surrounded by science: Learning science in informal environments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  5. National Research Council. (2011a). Chemistry in primetime and online: Communicating chemistry in informal environments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  6. National Research Council. (2011b). Learning science through computer games and simulations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  7. National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering. (2009). Nurturing and sustaining effective programs in science education for grades K-8: Building a village in California: Summary of a convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12739.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×

Learning Disabilities

  1. National Research Council. (2002a). Minority students in special and gifted education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10128.
  2. National Research Council. (2002b). Reporting test results for students with disabilities and English-language learners: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10410.

Learning in Academic Domains

  1. National Research Council. (2001). Adding it up: Helping children learn mathematics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/9822.
  2. National Research Council. (2002). Helping children learn mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10434.
  3. National Research Council. (2003). Assessment in support of instruction and learning: Bridging the gap between large-scale and classroom assessment—workshop report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/10802.
  4. National Research Council. (2005a). How students learn: Mathematics in the classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/11101.
  5. National Research Council. (2005b). Measuring literacy: Performance levels for adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/11267.
  6. National Research Council. (2011). Challenges and opportunities for education about dual use issues in the life sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12958.
  7. National Research Council. (2012). Improving adult literacy instruction: Developing reading and writing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13468.
  8. National Research Council. (2014a). Developing assessments for the next generation science standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18409.
  9. National Research Council. (2014b). Literacy for science: Exploring the intersection of the next generation science standards and common core for ELA standards: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18803.
  10. National Research Council. (2015). Guide to implementing the next generation science standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18802.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
  1. National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. (2006). Tech tally: Approaches to assessing technological literacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/11691.
  2. Institute of Medicine. (2009). Measures of health literacy: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12690.
  3. Institute of Medicine. (2011a). Improving health literacy within a state: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13185.
  4. Institute of Medicine. (2011b). Promoting health literacy to encourage prevention and wellness: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13186.
  5. Institute of Medicine. (2013a). Health literacy: Improving health, health systems, and health policy around the world: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18325.
  6. Institute of Medicine. (2013b). Organizational change to improve health literacy: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18378.
  7. Institute of Medicine. (2014a). Health literacy and numeracy: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18660.
  8. Institute of Medicine. (2014b). Implications of health literacy for public health: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18756.
  9. Institute of Medicine. (2015). Informed consent and health literacy: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/19019.
  10. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2015a). Health literacy and consumer-facing technology: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21781.
  11. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2015b). Health literacy: Past, present, and future: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21714.
  12. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2015c). Integrating discovery-based research into the undergraduate curriculum: Report of a convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21851.
  13. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016a). Food literacy: How do communications and marketing impact consumer knowledge, skills, and behavior? Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21897.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
  1. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016b). Health literacy and palliative care: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21839.
  2. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016c). Integrating health literacy, cultural competence, and language access services: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23498.
  3. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016d). Quality in the undergraduate experience: What is it? How is it measured? Who decides? Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23514.
  4. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016e). Science literacy: Concepts, contexts, and consequences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23595.
  5. National Research Council. (1999a). Designing mathematics or science curriculum programs: A guide for using mathematics and science education standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  6. National Research Council. (1999b). Grading the nation’s report card: Evaluating NAEP and transforming the assessment of educational progress. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  7. National Research Council. (1999c). Improving student learning: A strategic plan for education research and its utilization. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  8. National Research Council. (2002a). Learning and understanding: Improving advanced study of mathematics and science in U.S. high schools: Report of the Content Panel for Chemistry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  9. National Research Council. (2002b). Minority students in special and gifted education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  10. National Research Council. (2003a). Learning and instruction: A SERP research agenda. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  11. National Research Council. (2003b). Understanding others, educating ourselves: Getting more from international comparative studies in education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  12. National Research Council. (2005). Focusing on assessment of learning: Proceedings and transcripts from mathematics/science partnership workshops. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  13. National Research Council. (2008). Common standards for K-12 education?: Considering the evidence: Summary of a workshop series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  14. National Research Council. (2010a). Language diversity, school learning, and closing achievement gaps: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
  1. National Research Council. (2010b). Standards for K-12 engineering education? Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  2. National Research Council. (2012a). A framework for K-12 science education: Practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  3. National Research Council. (2012b). Improving measurement of productivity in higher education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  4. National Research Council. (2012c). Key national education indicators: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  5. National Research Council. (2013a). Adapting to a changing world—Challenges and opportunities in undergraduate physics education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  6. National Research Council. (2013b). Next generation science standards: For states, by states. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  7. National Research Council. (2015). Reaching students: What research says about effective instruction in undergraduate science and engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  8. National Research Council. (2016). Art, design and science, engineering and medicine frontier collaborations: Ideation, translation, realization: Seed idea group summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23528.

Motivation for Learning

  1. National Research Council. (2011). Learning science through computer games and simulations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13078.
  2. National Research Council. (2015). Reaching students: What research says about effective instruction in undergraduate science and engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18687.
  3. National Research Council. (2003). Engaging schools: Fostering high school students’ motivation to learn. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×

STEM

  1. National Research Council. (2011). Successful K-12 STEM education: Identifying effective approaches in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13158.
  2. National Research Council. (2015). Identifying and supporting productive STEM programs in out-of-school settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21740.
  3. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016). Art, design and science, engineering and medicine frontier collaborations: Ideation, translation, realization: Seed idea group summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23528.
  4. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016). Barriers and opportunities for 2-year and 4-year STEM degrees: Systemic change to support students’ diverse pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21739.
  5. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2015). Science teachers’ learning: Enhancing opportunities, creating supportive contexts. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21836.
  6. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016a). Developing a national STEM workforce strategy: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21900.
  7. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016b). Promising practices for strengthening the regional STEM workforce development ecosystem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21894.
  8. National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. (2014). STEM integration in K-12 education: Status, prospects, and an agenda for research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  9. National Research Council. (2004). The engineer of 2020: Visions of engineering in the new century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  10. National Research Council. (2011). Successful STEM education: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  11. National Research Council. (2012). Discipline-based education research: Understanding and improving learning in undergraduate science and engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  12. National Research Council. (2013). Monitoring progress toward successful K-12 STEM education: A nation advancing? Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
  1. National Research Council. (2014). STEM learning is everywhere: Summary of a convocation on building learning systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  2. National Research Council and National Academy of Engineering. (2012). Community colleges in the evolving STEM education landscape: Summary of a summit. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Teacher Quality

  1. National Research Council. (2000). Educating teachers of science, mathematics, and technology: New practices for the new millennium. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. doi:10.17226/9832.
  2. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2015). Science teachers’ learning: Enhancing opportunities, creating supportive contexts. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21836.
  3. National Research Council. (1999). Testing, teaching, and learning: A guide for states and school districts. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  4. National Research Council. (2000). Tests and teaching quality: Interim report. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  5. National Research Council. (2001a). Knowing and learning mathematics for teaching: Proceedings of a workshop. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  6. National Research Council. (2001b). Testing teacher candidates: The role of licensure tests in improving teacher quality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  7. National Research Council. (2008). Assessing accomplished teaching: Advanced-level certification programs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  8. National Research Council. (2010). Preparing teachers: Building evidence for sound policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  9. National Research Council. (2014). Exploring opportunities for STEM teacher leadership: Summary of a convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Technology in Education

  1. National Research Council. (2006). Learning to think spatially: GIS as a support system in the K-12 curriculum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/11019.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
  1. National Research Council. (2011). Learning science through computer games and simulations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/13078.
  2. National Academy of Engineering. (2013). Educating engineers: Preparing 21st century leaders in the context of new modes of learning: Summary of a forum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18254.
  3. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016). A vision for the future of center-based multidisciplinary engineering research: Proceedings of a symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23645.
  4. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016). Envisioning the future of health professional education: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21796.
  5. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016a). Achieving science with cubesats: Thinking inside the box. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23503.
  6. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016b). Future directions for NSF advanced computing infrastructure to support U.S. science and engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21886.
  7. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016c). Quality in the undergraduate experience: What is it? How is it measured? Who decides? Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/23514.
  8. National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. (2006). Tech tally: Approaches to assessing technological literacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  9. National Research Council. (2001). Investigating the influence of standards: A framework for research in mathematics, science, and technology education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  10. National Research Council. (2002a). Enhancing undergraduate learning with information technology: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  11. National Research Council. (2002b). Improving learning with information technology: Report of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  12. National Research Council. (2002c). Preparing for the revolution: Information technology and the future of the research university. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
  1. National Research Council. (2003). Planning for two transformations in education and learning technology: Report of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  2. National Research Council. (2006). ICT fluency and high schools: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  3. National Research Council. (2011a). Promising practices in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education: Summary of two workshops. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  4. National Research Council. (2011b). Successful K-12 STEM education: Identifying effective approaches in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  5. National Research Council. (2012). Infusing real world experiences into engineering education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/18184.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Relevant Reports Published by the National Academies Press." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24783.
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There are many reasons to be curious about the way people learn, and the past several decades have seen an explosion of research that has important implications for individual learning, schooling, workforce training, and policy.

In 2000, How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition was published and its influence has been wide and deep. The report summarized insights on the nature of learning in school-aged children; described principles for the design of effective learning environments; and provided examples of how that could be implemented in the classroom.

Since then, researchers have continued to investigate the nature of learning and have generated new findings related to the neurological processes involved in learning, individual and cultural variability related to learning, and educational technologies. In addition to expanding scientific understanding of the mechanisms of learning and how the brain adapts throughout the lifespan, there have been important discoveries about influences on learning, particularly sociocultural factors and the structure of learning environments.

How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures provides a much-needed update incorporating insights gained from this research over the past decade. The book expands on the foundation laid out in the 2000 report and takes an in-depth look at the constellation of influences that affect individual learning. How People Learn II will become an indispensable resource to understand learning throughout the lifespan for educators of students and adults.

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