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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
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Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands

Committee on Energy Resource Potential for DOE Lands

Board on Energy and Environmental Systems

Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

A Consensus Study Report of

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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS
Washington, DC
www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS500 Fifth Street, NWWashington, DC 20001

This activity was supported by Contract No. DE-PI0000010, Task Order DE-DT0007283, from the U.S. Department of Energy. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization or agency that provided support for the project.

Digital Object Identifier: https://doi.org/10.17226/24825

Copyright 2017 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

Suggested citation: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/24825.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
×

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The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, nongovernmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia McNutt is president.

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Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www.nationalacademies.org.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
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Consensus Study Reports published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine document the evidence-based consensus on the study’s statement of task by an authoring committee of experts. Reports typically include findings, conclusions, recommendations based on information gathered by the committee and the committee’s and deliberations. Each report has been subjected to a rigorous and independent peer-review process and it represents the position of the National Academies on the statement of task.

Proceedings published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine chronicle the presentations and discussions at a workshop, symposium, or other event convened by the National Academies. The statements and opinions contained in proceedings are those of the participants and are not endorsed by other participants, the planning committee, or the National Academies.

For information about other products and activities of the National Academies, please visit www.nationalacademies.org/about/whatwedo.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
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COMMITTEE ON ENERGY RESOURCE POTENTIAL FOR DOE LANDS

PAUL A. DECOTIS, West Monroe Partners, New York, Chair

JAMES A. (JIM) AJELLO, Hawaiian Electric Industries, Honolulu

CHRISTINE EHLIG-ECONOMIDES, NAE,1 Texas A&M University

WILLIAM L. FISHER, NAE, University of Texas, Austin

SAM KALEN, University of Wyoming, Laramie

JACKALYNE PFANNENSTIEL,2 Independent Consultant, Piedmont, California

DAN REICHER, Stanford University, Stanford, California

JEAN-MICHEL M. RENDU, NAE, Independent Consultant, Santa Fe, New Mexico

STAN ROSINSKI, Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina

TERRY SURLES, State of Hawaii Strategic Industries Division

Staff

ELIZABETH ZEITLER, Study Director (through September 2015)

MARTIN OFFUTT, Study Director (from September 2015)

JAMES ZUCCHETTO, Director, Board on Energy and Environmental Systems

LANITA JONES, Administrative Coordinator

ELIZABETH EULLER, Program Assistant (through June 2016)

___________________

1 National Academy of Engineering.

2 Deceased April 26, 2017.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
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BOARD ON ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS

JARED COHON, NAE,1 Carnegie Mellon University, Chair

DAVID ALLEN, NAE, University of Texas, Austin

W. TERRY BOSTON, NAE, PJM Interconnection, LLC, Audubon, Pennsylvania

WILLIAM BRINKMAN, NAS,2 Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey

EMILY A. CARTER, NAS/NAE, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey

BARBARA KATES-GARNICK, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts

JOANN MILLIKEN, Independent Consultant, Alexandria, Virginia

MARGO OGE, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, Environmental Protection Agency, McLean, Virginia

JACKALYNE PFANNENSTIEL3, Independent Consultant, Piedmont, California

MICHAEL RAMAGE, NAE, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company (retired), Moorestown, NJ

DOROTHY ROBYN, Consultant, Washington, D.C.

GARY ROGERS, Roush Industries, Livonia, Michigan

KELLY SIMS-GALLAGHER, The Fletcher School, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts

MARK THIEMENS, NAS, University of California, San Diego

JOHN WALL, NAE, Cummins Engine Company (retired), Belvedere, California

ROBERT WEISENMILLER, California Energy Commission, Sacramento, California

Staff

K. JOHN HOLMES, Acting Director/Scholar

JAMES ZUCCHETTO, Senior Scientist

MARTIN OFFUTT, Senior Program Officer

BEN WENDER, Program Officer

DANA CAINES, Financial Associate

LANITA JONES, Administrative Coordinator

JANKI PATEL, Program Assistant

___________________

1 National Academy of Engineering.

2 National Academy of Sciences.

3 Deceased April 26, 2017.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
×

Preface

Department of Energy (DOE)-managed lands continue to be a valuable asset among the nations’ property holdings. The potential for energy projects has attracted the interest of the private sector, and DOE sites can now boast of projects that have generated electric power using wind turbines and solar panels. Thus DOE-managed lands present an opportunity that can result in leasing revenues or production interests payable to DOE by developers to offset the cost of maintaining such properties. Existing, idle DOE-managed lands could become income generators, transitioning such lands, currently carried as liabilities, into assets. Yet while other governmental agencies, such as the Department of the Interior, have used their own Secretary’s office to facilitate the marketing of opportunities to promote renewable resource development by examining program opportunities on public lands, DOE, by contrast, appears to have done much less.

This report from the Committee on Energy Resource Potential for DOE Lands follows from a congressional request contained in the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009. DOE’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) commissioned an assessment of energy resource potential for DOE-managed lands from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), who managed the renewable energy portion, while subcontracting consideration of uranium and fossil resources to the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). LM entered into a contract with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to review the assessment by NREL/CSM. The committee found that the NREL/CSM study did not settle the question of which additional sites can be developed to take advantage of the available energy resources. Owing to budget constraints, the NREL/CSM assessment did not have the scope to engage in methodological development appropriate to the task nor to examine the roster of DOE-managed lands at the level of the individual site.

In this report, the committee provides its findings on the NREL/CSM study. These are intended constructively to help interpret the NREL/CSM study and its ability to address the important question of what potential the DOE-managed lands have for additional energy projects. The committee believes that developing energy projects on DOE-managed lands is a critical enterprise that can provide return on investment.

Paul A. DeCotis, Chair

Committee on Energy Resource Potential for DOE Lands

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
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Acknowledgment of Reviewers

This Consensus Study Report was reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in making each published report as sound as possible and to ensure that it meets the institutional standards for quality, objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process.

We thank the following individuals for their review of this report:

Dan Arvizu, NAE,1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (retired),

Andrew Brown, Jr., NAE, Delphi Corporation (retired),

Carlos Dengo, Texas A&M University,

Gary Dorris, Ascend Analytics,

Karen Douglas, California Energy Commission,

Charles Goodman, Southern Company Services (retired),

Gurcan Gulen, University of Texas, Austin,

Michael Hanemann, NAS,2 Arizona State University,

Bryan Long, Department of the Navy,

Karl Rabago, Pace University,

Alison Silverstein, Independent Consultant, and

Michael Telson, General Atomics.

Although the reviewers listed above provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations of this report nor did they see the final draft before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Julia Phillips, NAE, Sandia National Laboratories (retired). She was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with the standards of the National Academies and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content rests entirely with the authoring committee and the National Academies.

___________________

1 National Academy of Engineering.

2 National Academy of Sciences.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24825.
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The potential for energy resource development on Department of Energy (DOE)-managed lands remains a topic of interest within DOE, Congress, and with private developers interested in siting projects on DOE lands. Several previous studies have estimated the energy resource development potential using various approaches and methodologies.

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Legacy Management in 2013 with conducting a study to further refine and build upon previous analyses and to assess energy resource development potential on these lands. Utilizing the Energy Resource Potential of DOE Lands reviews and comments on the NREL study.

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