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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Facilitating Health Communication with Immigrant, Refugee, and Migrant Populations Through the Use of Health Literacy and Community Engagement Strategies: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24845.
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References

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Eisenman, D. P., A. S. Keller, and G. Kim. 2000. Survivors of torture in a general medical setting: How often have patients been tortured, and how often is it missed? Western Journal of Medicine 172(5):301-304.

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Quach, T., J. Von Behren, D. Goldberg, M. Layefsky, and P. Reynolds. 2015. Adverse birth outcomes and maternal complications in licensed cosmetologists and manicurists in california. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 88(7):823-833.

Roelofs, C., L. S. Azaroff, C. Holcroft, H. Nguyen, and T. Doan. 2008. Results from a community-based occupational health survey of Vietnamese-American nail salon workers. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health 10(4):353-361.

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Facilitating Health Communication with Immigrant, Refugee, and Migrant Populations Through the Use of Health Literacy and Community Engagement Strategies: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24845.
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Santos, M. G., M. A. Handley, K. Omark, and D. Schillinger. 2014. ESL participation as a mechanism for advancing health literacy in immigrant communities. Journal of Health Communication 19(Suppl 2):89-105.

Shannon, P., M. O’Dougherty, and E. Mehta. 2012. Refugees’ perspectives on barriers to communication about trauma histories in primary care. Mental Health in Family Medicine 9(1):47-55.

Walqui, A. 2006. Scaffolding instruction for english language learners: A conceptual framework. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 9(2):159-180.

Whiteside, A. 2008. Who is “who”?: ESL literacy, written text, and troubles with deixis in imagined spaced. Paper read at Low-Educated Second Language and Literacy Acquisition, third annual forum, Durham, UK.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Facilitating Health Communication with Immigrant, Refugee, and Migrant Populations Through the Use of Health Literacy and Community Engagement Strategies: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24845.
×
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Facilitating Health Communication with Immigrant, Refugee, and Migrant Populations Through the Use of Health Literacy and Community Engagement Strategies: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24845.
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Page 72
Next: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda »
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The increasingly diverse ethnic composition of the United States population has created a profound and ongoing demographic shift, and public health and health care organizations face many challenges as they move to address and adapt to this change. To better understand how the public health and health care communities can meet the challenges of serving an increasingly diverse population, the Roundtable on Health Literacy conducted a public workshop on facilitating health communication with immigrant, refugee, and migrant populations through the use of health literate approaches. The goal of the workshop was to identify approaches that will enable organizations that serve these ethnically and culturally diverse populations in a manner that allows all members of these communities to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and the services needed to make appropriate health and personal decisions. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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