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Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop (2017)

Chapter: Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
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Appendix C

Committee and Speaker Biographies

COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

Leah H. Jamieson (NAE; chair) is the Ransburg Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University, where she also is John A. Edwardson Dean Emerita of Engineering and holds a courtesy appointment in the School of Engineering Education. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and served as the 2007 president and CEO of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and 2012–2016 president of the IEEE Foundation. Jamieson was a founder of the Engineering Projects in Community Service program (EPICS), a multi-university engineering design program that operates in a service-learning context. She has been recognized with the NAE’s Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education, the NSF Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars, ASEE’s Carlson Award for Innovation in Engineering Education, the IEEE Education Society’s Harriet Rigas Outstanding Woman Engineering Educator Award, the Anita Borg Institute’s Women of Vision Award for Social Impact, the IEEE Signal Processing Society’s Meritorious Service Award, the Richard M. Emberson Award for contributions to IEEE’s Technical Activities, and the NAMEPA Dean of Engineering Champion Award. In recognition of her leadership, the Directorship of Purdue’s Women in Engineering Program was named in her honor upon completion of her term as Dean. Jamieson received a bachelor of science

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
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in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a PhD from Princeton University.

Stephanie G. Adams is the 7th dean of the Batten College of Engineering and Technology at Old Dominion University. She previously served as department head and professor of engineering education at Virginia Tech and held positions at Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her research interests include teamwork, international collaborations, faculty development, quality control/management, and diversity in STEM. She received the American Society for Engineering Education’s 2008 DuPont Minorities in Engineering Award and was invited to participate at the NAE 2006 US Frontiers of Engineering Symposium. Adams received a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from North Carolina A&T State University, a master of engineering in systems engineering from the University of Virginia, and a PhD in interdisciplinary engineering from Texas A&M University. She is a fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education.

Marilyn Barger is the principal investigator and executive director of FLATE, the Florida Regional Center of Excellence for Advanced Technological Education, funded by the National Science Foundation and housed at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa since 2004. FLATE serves the state of Florida and is involved in outreach and recruitment of students into technical career pathways; has produced award-winning curriculum design and reform for secondary and postsecondary career and technical education programs; and provides professional development for STEM and technology secondary and postsecondary educators focused on advanced technologies. She earned a BA in chemistry at Agnes Scott College and both a BS in engineering science and a PhD in civil engineering (environmental) from the University of South Florida, where her research focused on membrane separation science and technologies for water purification. She has over 20 years of experience in developing curricula for engineering and engineering technology for elementary, middle, high school, and postsecondary institutions, including colleges of engineering. Dr. Barger serves on several national panels and advisory boards for technical programs, curriculum, and workforce initiatives, including the National Association of Manufacturers Educators’ Council. She is a fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education, and a member of Tau Beta Pi and Epsilon Pi Tau honor societies. She is a charter member of both the National Academy and the University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
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of South Florida’s Academy of Inventors. Dr. Barger holds a patent and is a licensed Professional Engineer in Florida.

Steven Brown is a professor emeritus of counseling psychology at Loyola University Chicago. His research is aimed at a primary goal of promoting occupational and educational choices among diverse persons. He developed (with Drs. Robert W. Lent and Gail Hackett) Social Cognitive Career Theory to explain and predict how people develop educational and occupational interests, make educational and occupational choices, and achieve success and satisfaction in school and the workplace. Much of his current research is devoted to this theory, especially as it pertains to explaining interest, entry into, and success in STEM careers. He is also interested in international applications of vocational psychology and has worked collaboratively with scholars from Italy, Iceland, France, Switzerland, South Korea, China, and Japan to study whether measures of career indecision have the same meaning and measure the same constructs in diverse international cultures. Dr. Brown received a bachelor of arts in psychology from Muskingum College, a master of arts in experimental psychology from the University of Virginia, and a PhD in counseling psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Don P. Giddens (NAE) is dean emeritus of the College of Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1968, after two years in the aerospace industry. In 1992 he left his position as the chair of Aerospace Engineering to serve as dean of the Whiting School of Engineering and professor of mechanical engineering at Johns Hopkins University. In 1997 he returned to Georgia Tech to establish the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, a joint department between Georgia Tech’s College of Engineering and Emory University’s School of Medicine. He served as the founding chair until July 2002, when he became dean of the College of Engineering. Dr. Giddens has served in a variety of professional activities involving engineering education and biomedical research. His field of research is biomedical engineering with emphasis on the cardiovascular system. He is the author of over 300 research publications, book chapters, and presentations. His professional service includes chair of the Engineering Deans Council of ASEE and president of ASEE. He chaired the NAE project that produced the report Changing the Conversation: Messages for Improving Public Understanding of Engineering. He received his bachelor of science, master of science, and PhD from Georgia Tech.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×

Asad M. Madni (NAE) was president, COO, and CTO of BEI Technologies Inc. from 1992 until his retirement in 2006. He led the development and commercialization of intelligent microsensors and systems for aerospace, military, commercial, and transportation industries, including the Extremely Slow Motion Servo Control System for Hubble Space Telescope’s Star Selector System which provided the Hubble with unprecedented accuracy and stability, resulting in truly remarkable images that have enhanced understanding of the universe; and the revolutionary MEMS GyroChip® technology which is used worldwide for electronic stability control and rollover protection in passenger vehicles, saving millions of lives every year.

Prior to BEI he was with Systron Donner Corporation for 18 years in senior technical and executive positions, eventually as chair, president, and CEO. He made seminal and pioneering contributions in the development of RF and microwave systems and instrumentation which significantly enhanced the combat readiness of the US Navy (and its allies) and provided the DOD the ability (not possible with prior art) to simulate more threat-representative ECM environments for current and future advanced warfare training. Dr. Madni is an independent consultant; Distinguished Adjunct Professor and Distinguished Scientist of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UCLA; and executive managing director and CTO of Crocker Capital.

He is the recipient of major honors and awards including the IET J.J. Thomson Medal, IEEE Millennium Medal, UCSD Gordon Medal for Engineering Leadership, Mahatma Gandhi Pravasi Samman Gold Medal, IEEE AESS Pioneer Award, IEEE IMS Career Excellence Award, IEEE HKN Eminent Member and Vladimir Karapetoff Outstanding Technical Achievement Awards, and UCLA Alumnus of the Year Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Inventors, and a fellow/eminent member of 14 of the world’s most prestigious academies and professional societies. He has been awarded 5 honorary doctorates and 5 honorary professorships.

He received his BS and MS degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles, PhD from California Coast University, and SE from MIT Sloan School of Management.

Thomas Perry, PE, joined ASME in 1991 as director of professional development and served as director of engineering education from 1996 until his retirement in March 2017. He oversaw ASME’s work with universities and colleges of engineering and technology in the US and abroad. Working with academic, industry, and degree program accreditation volunteer leaders, Mr. Perry managed the work of the ASME Committee on Engineering

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×

Education, its standing committees and project work groups, and served as staff liaison for the society’s role in degree program accreditation through the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The work of the ASME Committee on Engineering Education engages outstanding academic and industry leaders in helping shape the quality and future of mechanical engineering education, particularly toward increasing undergraduate design-build-innovation experiences; providing greater exposure to industry practice; encouraging the employment and industry support of professors of practice/clinical professors in mechanical engineering faculties; and increasing the number of women and minority students and faculty in colleges of engineering—all part of the ASME Engineering Education Vision 2030 advocacy strategy. With over 30 years’ experience in the industry, academic, and professional society communities, Mr. Perry has also served as deputy executive director for the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE).

Anne Spence is a clinical associate professor in mechanical engineering at Baylor University. Her research program is focused on solving problems that relate to educating engineers as they navigate through the K-12 and postsecondary pipelines. She is focused on the national research agenda in engineering education which highlights engineering epistemologies, engineering learning mechanisms, engineering learning systems, engineering diversity and inclusiveness, and engineering assessment. She conducts research on and develops assessment methods, instruments, and metrics to inform engineering education practice and learning in both the K-12 and postsecondary environments. As a leader in the Project Lead the Way and FIRST communities, Dr. Spence seeks to identify best practices in educating teachers and engaging students to persevere through the STEM pipeline.

John C. Wall (NAE) has more than 35 years of industry experience in internal combustion engine technology, fuels and emissions, and global engineering organization development. Most recently, he was vice president and chief technical officer of Cummins Inc., the world’s largest independent manufacturer of diesel engines and related technologies, retiring in 2015. As he progressed from research and product engineering into engineering leadership, he remained directly involved in the most critical technology programs for low emissions, powertrain efficiency and alternative fuels. He also led the growth of Cummins’ technical organization from 1,000 engineers, mostly in the United States, to more than 6,000 globally, establishing new technical

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×

centers in India and China. Before joining Cummins in 1986, he led diesel and aviation fuels research for Chevron, where his team was first to discover the important contribution of fuel sulfur to diesel particulate emissions. Today he stays active technically as an advisor for the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute and Co-Optima Program, the Cyclotron Road energy incubator at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in the work of the National Academies, and as chair of the Cummins Science and Technology Council. He has been recognized for his technical contributions by election to the NAE and as a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers. He has received the SAE Horning Memorial Award and Arch T. Colwell Merit Award for research in the area of diesel fuel effects on emissions, and Franz F. Pischinger Award for Powertrain Innovation, the ASME Soichiro Honda Medal for significant engineering contributions in the field of personal transportation, and the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit Clean Air Award and US EPA Thomas W. Zosel Individual Achievement Award for career accomplishments in diesel emission control. Dr. Wall studied mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he received his SB and SM degrees in 1975 and ScD in 1978.

Gregory N. Washington is the Stacey Nicholas Dean of the Henry Samueli School of Engineering at the University of California, Irvine. Prior to his arrival at UC Irvine, he served as the interim dean for the College of Engineering at the Ohio State University (OSU), where he provided visionary leadership, oversight, and management for one of the nation’s largest and highest-ranked engineering programs. He joined the faculty at OSU in 1995, became the associate dean for research in 2005 and was appointed interim dean in 2008. As a professor of mechanical engineering, his research is in the design and control of smart material systems, the design and control of hybrid electric vehicles and the design of smart electromagnetic systems. Washington has been involved in multidomain research for the last 20 years. His core area of interest is dynamic systems, with an emphasis on modeling and control of smart material systems and devices. He has been involved in the design and control of mechanically actuated antennas, advanced automotive systems incorporating smart materials, hybrid electric vehicles, and structural position and vibration control with smart materials. Dr. Washington received a bachelor of science, master of science, and PhD in mechanical engineering from North Carolina State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES

Barbara Bogue is cofounder and director of the AWE Project and retired associate professor of engineering science and mechanics and women in engineering at Penn State University Park. Previously, as director of the Penn State Women in Engineering Program, Ms. Bogue led the establishment of recruitment, retention, and development activities for girls and women. Her work was recognized with several awards, most notably the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring. Ms. Bogue develops and presents workshops on assessment and faculty development and evaluates and consults on interventions that aim to increase the participation and progression of women and underrepresented minorities in STEM. She publishes frequently on topics related to engineering education, equity, and assessment and serves on several national advisory boards. She holds an MSc in social sciences from the University of Southampton. Ms. Bogue lives with her husband in Alexandria, Virginia, and enjoys writing, gardening, and developing engineering activities for her six grandchildren.

Elliot Douglas is the NSF program director for Engineering Education. He is also associate professor of environmental engineering sciences and Distinguished Teaching Fellow at the University of Florida. He is director of the Engineering Education Collaborative, which brings together faculty interested in all aspects of engineering education, from improving their teaching to conducting education research. His research interests lie at the intersection of education research and engineering education practice. His work aims to understand complex thinking processes and learning in students, and to use this information to design effective teaching practices, and includes research in critical thinking, active learning, and problem solving. He has recently begun a project to examine the culture of inclusion in high-tech firms through the narratives of minority engineers. He also conducts work on qualitative methodologies in engineering education research. He has published a textbook, Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering: A Guided Inquiry, which provides faculty teaching Introduction to Materials a means to easily incorporate active learning techniques into their classrooms. He has been involved in faculty development activities since 1998, most recently presenting workshops on active learning through the POGIL Project. Dr. Douglas received SBs in materials science and engineering and MSE and Music from MIT in 1988, and his PhD in polymer science and engi-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×

neering from UMass-Amherst in 1992. He then worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory for four years before joining the University of Florida in 1996. He has served as deputy editor of the Journal of Engineering Education and chair of the Educational Research and Methods Division of ASEE.

Darryll J. Pines is dean and Nariman Farvardin Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland. He arrived at the Clark School in 1995 as an assistant professor and in 2006 became chair of the Department of Aerospace Engineering. As dean since 2009, Dr. Pines has led the development of the school’s strategic plan and improved teaching in fundamental undergraduate courses, raised student retention, achieved success in national and international student competitions, placed new emphasis on sustainability engineering and service learning, promoted STEM education among high school students, increased the impact of research programs, and expanded philanthropic contributions to the school. Today, the school’s one-year undergraduate retention rate and six-year graduation rate are 87.6 percent and 74.2 percent respectively; the university’s Solar Decathlon team placed first worldwide in a recent competition against other leading universities; the university’s Engineers Without Borders chapter is considered one of the nation’s best; and the Engineering Sustainability Workshop launched by Pines has become a key campus event. At the national level Pines has testified before Congress on STEM education and has led an effort as part of the American Society for Engineering Education Deans Council’s K-12 STEM Committee to develop a potential College Board AP exam in engineering. He is secretary of the executive committee of the National GEM Consortium, a national nonprofit providing programming and full fellowships to support increasing untapped domestic human capital at the graduate level in STEM fields. Dr. Pines’ current research focuses on structural dynamics, including structural health monitoring and prognosis, smart sensors, and adaptive, morphing, and biologically inspired structures, as well as the guidance, navigation, and control of uninhabited aerospace vehicles. He is a fellow of the Institute of Physics, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and has received an NSF CAREER Award. He received a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and MS and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×

Betty Shanahan is a consultant to the executive vice president of administrative services at Michigan State University. From 2002 to 2014, she was executive director and CEO for the Society of Women Engineers (SWE). Prior to SWE, she spent 24 years in executive management, engineering management, development, and marketing in the electronics and software industries. In 2010 she was the first woman to receive the Claud R. Erickson Distinguished Alumnus Award from the College of Engineering at Michigan State University. In 2013 she received an honorary doctor of science from the University of Connecticut. In 2016 the American Association of Engineering Societies recognized her contributions to the engineering profession and diversity in engineering with its Chair’s Award. Ms. Shanahan earned a BS in electrical engineering from Michigan State University, a master of software engineering from the Wang Institute of Graduate Studies, and an MBA in strategic management from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Speaker Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Societies and Undergraduate Engineering Education: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24878.
×
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Engineering professional societies in the United States are engaged in a wide range of activities involving undergraduate education. However, these activities generally are not coordinated and have not been assessed in such a way that information about their procedures and outcomes can be shared. Nor have they been assessed to determine whether they are optimally configured to mesh with corresponding initiatives undertaken by industry and academia. Engineering societies work largely independently on undergraduate education, leaving open the question of how much more effective their efforts could be if they worked more collaboratively—with each other as well as with academia and industry. To explore the potential for enhancing societies’ role at the undergraduate level, the National Academy of Engineering held a workshop on the engagement of engineering societies in undergraduate engineering education. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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