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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
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Appendix C

Workshop Speaker Biographies

As of February 2014

Albert J. Allen, M.D., Ph.D., is the senior medical fellow with responsibility for bioethics and pediatric capabilities at Lilly Research Labs, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. Dr. Allen received a B.S. in chemistry and an M.S. in biochemistry from The University of Chicago and an M.D. and a Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. In 1995, Dr. Allen and his mentors, Dr. Susan Swedo and Dr. Henrietta Leonard, shared the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry’s Norbert and Charlotte Rieger Award for Scientific Achievement for their research on possible infection-triggered cases of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and tics. In the same year, he joined the Institute for Juvenile Research at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he was an assistant professor in child and adolescent psychiatry. In Chicago, he established and ran a pediatric OCD and tic disorders clinic. He joined Eli Lilly in April 2000 and, in late 2003, he became global medical director of the Strattera Product Team. In October 2004, he was made global medical director of the Neuroscience Platform Team. In the past few years, he was the senior medical director globally for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and related disorders. He was also extensively involved with several activities related to pediatric studies and global regulatory activities across Lilly’s neuroscience products, and has participated in pharmaceutical industry activities in pediatric drug development and the assessment of drugs in development for human abuse liability. He chairs Lilly’s Bioethics Advisory Committee and co-chairs Lilly’s Pediatric Steering Committee, and he is the past chair of Lilly’s Drug Abuse Liability and Dependence Advisory Committee. Dr. Allen is a member of the American Psychiatric Association and the American Academy

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. He is also a specialty fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. In July 2012, he was appointed to the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections, a federal advisory committee in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that provides expert advice and recommendations to the Secretary of HHS on issues and topics pertaining to the protection of human research subjects.

Paul S. Appelbaum, M.D., is the Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine, and Law, and director of the Division of Psychiatry, Law, and Ethics, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University; a research psychiatrist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute; and an affiliated faculty member, Columbia Law School. He directs Columbia’s Center for Research on Ethical, Legal, & Social Implications of Psychiatric, Neurologic, & Behavioral Genetics, and heads the Clinical Research Ethics Core for Columbia’s Clinical and Translational Science Award program. His research interests include the prediction and management of violent behavior by people with mental illness. He is the author of many articles and books on law and ethics in clinical practice and research. Dr. Appelbaum is a graduate of Columbia College, received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and completed his residency in psychiatry at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center of the Harvard Medical School in Boston. He is past president of the American Psychiatric Association and a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Madelon Baranoski, Ph.D., M.S.N., is an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry, Law and Psychiatry Division, of Yale University School of Medicine, and faculty in the Immigration and Veterans Clinics in the Yale Law School. She is also vice chair of the Yale University Human Investigation Committees and the director of the New Haven Jail Diversion Program of the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and the Connecticut Mental Health Center. Her research interests include violence risk assessment and management, cultural manifestations of trauma and depression, assessment of competency in court-ordered evaluations, and state-of-mind evaluations. Dr. Baranoski received her B.S.N. from the University of Maryland Walter Reed Army Institute in 1969, her M.S.N. from Yale University School of Nursing in 1974, and her Ph.D. in clinical and developmental psychology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1982. She has published and presented on risk assessment and management in psychiatric populations.

Colleen L. Barry, Ph.D., M.P.P., is an associate professor and an associate chair for research and practice in the Department of Health Policy and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Professor Barry conducts policy analysis and political communication research with a focus on vulnerable populations and often stigmatized health conditions, including mental illness, substance use, and obesity. Much of her current research involves examining the implications of various aspects of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on persons with mental illness and/or substance use disorders. She has also led studies examining public opinion and political persuasion in the context of childhood obesity, mental illness, and gun policy.

Robert Bernstein, Ph.D., is a psychologist with a strong interest in ensuring meaningful community participation and promoting the consumer voice within mental health systems, particularly for individuals who are marginalized or neglected by public systems. For 19 years before his appointment to this post, Dr. Bernstein was the architect and director of one of the nation’s oldest and largest mental health and aging programs. NSO-Older Adult Services in Detroit, Michigan, featured an innovative system that blended in-home services and advocacy to support older adults with persistent mental illnesses in integrated community settings. In addition to his work with that trailblazing program, he ran a private practice where he specialized in treating children and adolescents. Dr. Bernstein is a leader in the field of mental health policy and advocacy. He has published several important papers and served as an expert in litigation concerning such areas as conditions in psychiatric institutions, the use of seclusion and restraint, community mental health, older adult needs, and fair housing. He also contributed to the preparation of the 1999 Surgeon General’s Report on Mental Health and the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health.

James Blair, M.D., is the chief of the Unit on Affective Cognitive Neuroscience at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Dr. Blair received a doctoral degree in psychology from University College London in 1993 under the supervision of Professor John Morton. Following graduation, he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Mental Health Research Fellowship, which he held at the Medical Research Council Cognitive Development Unit for 3 years. Subsequently, he moved to the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London. There, with Uta Frith, he helped form and co-lead the Developmental Disorders group, and was ultimately appointed senior lecturer. He joined the NIMH Intramural Research Program in 2002. Dr. Blair’s primary research interest involves understanding the neurocognitive systems mediating affect in humans and how these become dysfunctional in mood and anxiety disorders. His primary clinical focus is on understanding the dysfunction of affect-related systems in youth with specific forms of conduct disorder.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

His research approach includes techniques employed in cognitive neuroscience (both neuropsychology and functional imaging), psychopharmacology, and molecular genetics.

C. Hendricks Brown, Ph.D., is a professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Preventive Medicine in the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He also holds adjunct appointments in the Departments of Biostatistics and Mental Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, as well as in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami. He directs the National Institute on Drug Abuse–funded Center for Prevention Implementation Methodology (Ce-PIM) for Drug Abuse and Sexual Risk Behavior and an NIMH-funded study to synthesize findings from individual-level data across multiple randomized trials for adolescent depression. Recently, his work has focused on the prevention of drug abuse, conduct disorder, depression, and particularly the prevention of suicide. Dr. Brown has been a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Committee on Prevention Science, and serves on numerous federal panels, advisory boards, and editorial boards.

Eric Caine, M.D., has investigated factors that contribute to suicide, with a focus on links to unemployment, choice of specific methods, burdens of suicide, and attempts during young and middle adulthood. Past research has focused on military personnel and their families in the areas of intimate partner and family violence and suicide. Currently, his work has addressed public health approaches to prevention that complement individually oriented treatments. He has been the principal investigator of multiple National Institutes of Health (NIH) research and training grants related to suicide research and prevention. Since 2001, he has led a series of collaborative initiatives in China that deal with suicide prevention, the delivery of mental health services in developing countries, and the potential for public health approaches to reduce injuries and deaths.

Seena Fazel, M.D., F.R.C.Psych., is a Wellcome Trust senior research fellow in clinical science at the University of Oxford, and a consultant forensic psychiatrist at Oxford Health National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust. His research work focuses on relationship between severe mental illness and violent crime, violence risk assessment, and the mental health and the suicide risk of prisoners. He has served on advisory boards for NHS research funding committees and the crime reduction charity Nacro, and has given evidence to the U.K. Government Justice Select Committee and the United Nations–backed Khmer Rouge war crimes tribunal.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

Daniel Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., obtained a Ph.D. in biochemistry to discover the possible chemical basis of mental health issues. While carrying out neurochemical research at the National Institute of Mental Health, Dr. Fisher was diagnosed with schizophrenia. He recovered through building meaningful relationships. He found a biochemical explanation of behavior too alienating; to humanize the mental health system, he obtained an M.D. at The George Washington University Medical School and completed psychiatric training at Harvard University. Dr. Fisher worked for 25 years as a community psychiatrist at a mental health center, founded the National Empowerment Center, has been a member of the New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, and helped organize the National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery. He has given more than 1,000 speeches and workshops on recovery and peer support across the United States and in 12 countries. He is on the faculty of the University of Massachusetts Department of Psychiatry, where he is helping to adapt Open Dialogue to the United States. Dr. Fisher helped peers in Louisiana respond to the emotional crises following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Based on his post-Katrina experiences, he helped develop Emotional CPR.

Patrick Fox, M.D., completed his residency training in general adult and forensic psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine in 1999. He is board certified in Adult General and Forensic Psychiatry. Additionally, he currently serves on the Forensic Examination Committee for the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He has presented nationally and internationally on seclusion and restraint reform, physician-assisted suicide, mental health reform, sex offender management, violence risk management, outpatient civil commitment, and jail diversion programs. He has also served on state panels addressing access to care for and management of youth with psychiatric disabilities, sex offender registration, sexually violent predator statutes, and civil commitment. Following his completion of residency and fellowship training, Dr. Fox remained on the faculty at Yale as an assistant professor, working initially as a consulting forensic psychiatrist for the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, and later serving as director for the Whiting Forensic Division, Connecticut’s maximum security forensic hospital. Additionally, he was deputy director for Yale’s Forensic Psychiatry Training Program from 2007 to 2012. In 2012, he took a position as attending psychiatrist for the Denver County Sheriffs’ Department, managing the city jail’s most acutely ill inmates. In April 2013, Dr. Fox was appointed deputy director of clinical services for the Colorado Department of Human Services’ Office of Behavioral Health. He has been serving as acting director for the Office of Behavioral Health since October 2013. In this capacity, he is responsible for overseeing all administrative and clinical services related to the provision of mental health and substance abuse treatment for the office.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

Sheldon Greenberg, Ph.D., is a professor of management in the School of Education, Division of Public Safety Leadership at the Johns Hopkins School of Education. He served as associate dean for more than a decade, during which time he led the Police Executive Leadership Program and established university partnerships with the U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. For almost 2 years, Dr. Greenberg served as associate dean and interim director of the Johns Hopkins University Division of Business and Management (currently the Carey Business School). His primary research interests are police patrol, the relationship between police and public health, police organizational structure, highway safety, campus and school safety, the role of the police in community development, and community organizing. Before joining Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Greenberg served as associate director of the Police Executive Research Forum, the nation’s largest law enforcement think tank and center for research. He began his career with the Howard County, Maryland, Police Department, where he served as a patrol officer, supervisor, director of the police academy, director of research and planning, and commander of the Administrative Services Bureau. He worked with the U.S. Marshals Service, U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Department of Justice, and U.S. Department of State, as well as with police agencies in Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Jordan, Kenya, Pakistan, and Panama. Dr. Greenberg has served on national commissions and task forces on violence in schools, race-based profiling, police response to people who have mental illness, police recruiting, highway safety, military deployment, and homeland defense. He serves also as a member of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Accreditation Board. Dr. Greenberg is the author of numerous articles and several books, including Stress and the Helping Professions, Stress and the Teaching Profession, and On the Dotted Line, a guide to hiring and retaining police executives. He has completed his fourth book, Mastery of Police Patrol, which will be published by Pearson Prentice Hall, and is working on his fifth book on managing community fear.

Thomas R. Insel, M.D., is the director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) committed to research on mental disorders. Dr. Insel has served as director of this $1.5 billion agency since 2002. During his tenure, he has focused on the genetics and neurobiology of mental disorders, as well as transforming approaches to diagnosis and treatment. Before serving as NIMH director, Dr. Insel was professor of psychiatry at Emory University, where he was founding director of the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience and director of the Yerkes Regional Primate Center in Atlanta. Dr. Insel’s research has examined the neural basis of complex social behaviors, including maternal care and attachment. A member of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

the National Academy of Medicine, he has received numerous national and international awards and served in several leadership roles at NIH.

Janis Jenkins, Ph.D., received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, and completed her postdoctoral training in clinically relevant medical anthropology at Harvard Medical School. She is internationally recognized for her expertise on cultural and mental health. Her principal interests include the course and outcome of major mental illness, psychopharmacology, ethnicity, violence, adolescence, resilience, and qualitative methods. Her research has been conducted with Latino and Latin American immigrants and refugees, along with Euro-American, African American, and Native American populations. As co-principal investigator for the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded study “Southwest Youth and the Experience of Psychiatric Treatment,” Dr. Jenkins and her team have investigated psychiatric disorders, cultural meaning, and violence among adolescents who have received inpatient treatment in New Mexico. Dr. Jenkins has been on faculty at Harvard University, Case Western Reserve University, and University of California, San Diego, where she is professor of anthropology and adjunct professor of psychiatry. She has been principal investigator for a series of NIMH-funded studies on culture and mental health. She has also been awarded funding by the School for Advanced Research and the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression. Dr. Jenkins has served as a member of three Scientific Review Groups at NIMH. She is a member of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, New Jersey (in residence during academic year 2011–2012). She has been visiting scholar-in-residence at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York City, the Institute of Social Medicine in Rio de Janeiro, and Distinguished Visiting Faculty at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She has published widely in scientific journals, including American Journal of Psychiatry, British Journal of Psychiatry, and Medical Anthropology Quarterly. She has published two edited volumes: Schizophrenia, Culture, and Subjectivity: The Edge of Experience (with R. J. Barrett) by Cambridge University Press (2004) and Pharmaceutical Self: The Global Shaping of Experience in an Age of Psychopharmacology (School for Advanced Research, 2011).

Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H., joined the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in July 2003 as the director of the Board on Global Health. He was subsequently appointed as the director of the Board on African Science Academy Development. Dr. Kelley has overseen a portfolio of National Academies expert consensus studies and convening activities on subjects as wide ranging as the evaluation of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR); the U.S. commitment to global

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

health; sustainable surveillance for zoonotic infections; substandard, falsified, and counterfeit drugs; innovations in health professional education; cardiovascular disease prevention in low- and middle-income countries; interpersonal violence prevention in low- and middle-income countries; and microbial threats to health. He also directs a unique capacity-building effort, the African Science Academy Development Initiative, which over 11 years aims to strengthen the capacity of eight African academies to provide independent, evidence-based advice to their governments on scientific matters.

Before joining the National Academies, Dr. Kelley served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemiologist, and program manager. In his last U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) position, Dr. Kelley founded and directed the DoD Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System. This responsibility entailed managing surveillance and capacity-building partnerships with numerous elements of the federal government and with health ministries in more than 45 developing countries. He also founded the DoD Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity and served as the specialty editor for a landmark two-volume textbook, titled Military Preventive Medicine: Mobilization and Deployment. Dr. Kelley is an experienced communicator having lectured in English or Spanish in over 20 countries. He has authored or co-authored more than 70 scholarly papers, book chapters, and monographs and has supervised the completion of more than 25 National Academies consensus reports and workshop summaries. While at the National Academies, he has obtained grants and contracts for work conducted by his unit from more than 60 governmental and nongovernmental sources. Dr. Kelley obtained his M.D. from the University of Virginia and his Dr.P.H. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He has also been awarded two honorary doctoral degrees and is board certified in Preventive Medicine and Public Health.

Dévora Kestel, M.Sc., M.P.H., is a mental health regional adviser at the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). She is Argentinean and obtained her M.Sc. in psychology (Universidad Nacional de La Plata). She later earned an M.Sc. in public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. After completing her university studies in Argentina, she moved to Italy, where she worked for 10 years in the development and supervision of community-based mental health services in Trieste and other cities of the region. In 2000, she joined the World Health Organization (WHO) in Kosovo as a mental health officer. In 2001, she moved to Albania, holding the same position until 2006, when she was appointed WHO Representative to Albania. In both countries, she worked closely with the Ministries of Health to help establish comprehensive community-based

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

mental health systems. In 2007, Mrs. Kestel joined PAHO as a subregional mental health adviser for the English-speaking Caribbean countries, based in Barbados. Since November 2011, Mrs. Kestel has served as the regional mental health adviser, based in Washington, DC, providing technical cooperation in the mental health field to the region, with special attention to the Caribbean subregion.

Ray Kotwicki, M.D., M.P.H., is passionate about linking excellent clinical care with medical student education. As the director of medical student education for the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University’s School of Medicine, he focuses on helping trainees cultivate not only proficiency in delivery of mental health and primary care medical services, but also medical professionalism. In partnership with Dr. Lisa Bernstein from the Department of Internal Medicine, Dr. Kotwicki co-directs the Emory School of Medicine’s “Becoming A Doctor” curriculum, a 4-year longitudinal program designed to train medical students in the highest standards of clinical skills, professionalism, ethics, and medical professionals’ roles and responsibilities within society. He received the prestigious Dean’s Golden Apple Teaching Award in 2010. In addition to his responsibilities in education, Dr. Kotwicki serves as chief medical officer of Skyland Trail, a private nonprofit community treatment facility recently awarded the American Psychiatric Association’s Gold Award. Skyland Trail’s mission is to inspire people with mental illness to thrive through a holistic program of evidence-based psychiatric treatment, integrated medical care, research, and education. Services offered at Skyland Trail include residential treatment, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient care, and community-based health navigation support, based on patients’ individualized recovery plan and needs. Emory’s medical students beginning their psychiatry clerkships orient at Skyland Trail, and several remain at the program for the duration of their mental health training. Dr. Kotwicki is past president of the Board of Positive Impact, Inc., a prevention and service delivery program for people infected with or affected by HIV/AIDS, and currently sits on the Board of Directors for Georgia Psychiatric Physicians Association and Mental Health America of Georgia. He contributes to the Emory community in other ways as well, including roles within the Medical School’s Admission Committee, Progress and Promotions Committee, and Executive Curriculum Committee. The National Alliance on Mental Illness honored Dr. Kotwicki’s many contributions to training law enforcement officers on crisis intervention techniques by naming him an “Exemplary Psychiatrist in Georgia” in 2007.

Ronaldo Laranjeira, Ph.D., is a professor of psychiatry and addictive behaviors at the Federal University of São Paulo, and the director of the National

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

Institute of Alcohol and Drugs Policies, Brazil. He finished his Ph.D. at the London University, National Addiction Center, with Professor Griffith Edwards in 1995. He returned to São Paulo, Brazil, and set up an Addiction Research Unit. His work at the National Addiction center has focused on several areas: organizing for the first time in Brazil two national household surveys on alcohol and drugs, in collaboration with Dr. Raul Caetano from Texas University; working on the study and implementation of alcohol and drug policies in the community, such as the closing of bars in the city of Diadema, zero blood alcohol concentration for drivers, partner violence related to alcohol, and violence and mortality related to “crack/cocaine” use; implementing an alcohol and drug treatment system in the State of São Paulo. Dr. Laranjeira is also a member of the Department of Addiction of the Brazilian Psychiatric Association.

Kenneth Leonard, Ph.D., is the director of the Research Institute on Addictions and a research professor of psychiatry at the University at Buffalo Medical School. He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Kent State University in 1981, and postdoctoral training in psychiatric and alcohol epidemiology at the Western Psychiatric Institute and the Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh. He is a Fellow in Divisions 50 (Addictions) and 28 (Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse) in the American Psychological Association, and is a former president of Division 50. He is a member of the International Society for Research on Aggression, and is currently a council member for this organization. He is also a member of the Research Society on Alcoholism. He has been a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol since 1992, a member of the Board of Directors of Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, and a member of the Editorial Advisory Board, Review of Aggression and Violent Behavior. He served as associate editor for the Journal of Abnormal Psychology and has been consulting editor for the Journal of Abnormal Psychology and for Psychological Bulletin. Dr. Leonard’s research interests have centered on the interpersonal and familial influences on substance abuse, as well as the influence of substance abuse on interpersonal and family processes. He is internationally recognized for his research on substance abuse and intimate partner violence, but has been concerned with the impact of alcoholism on child development and the role of marital and family processes in the prevention and treatment of substance abuse. He has also conducted research focused on the prevalence of violence in the lives of young men and women, and factors associated with “bar room” violence.

Michael Luo has worked at The New York Times since 2003. He became deputy metropolitan editor in 2014, helping to oversee coverage of New York City and the surrounding region and directing a team of reporters

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

focusing on investigations and long-form feature projects. Before becoming an editor, he was a reporter for 3 years in The New York Times’s investigations cluster. Much of his work explored gaps in gun laws and their impact on public safety, as well as the influence of the gun lobby. He spent 2012 working on investigative stories related to the presidential campaign. Mr. Luo has written about economics and the recession as a national correspondent; covered the 2008 presidential campaign and the 2010 midterm elections; and done stints in the Washington, DC, and Baghdad bureaus. He started at the paper on the metropolitan desk. Before joining The New York Times, he was a national writer at The Associated Press, where he wrote narrative feature stories from around the country. He has also worked at Newsday and the Los Angeles Times. In 2002, he won a George Polk Award for criminal justice reporting and a Livingston Award for Young Journalists for a series of articles on three poor, mentally retarded African Americans in Alabama who were in prison for killing a baby who probably never existed. As a result of the series, two of the prisoners were freed; the third remained in prison on a separate charge. Mr. Luo graduated in 1998 from Harvard University, where he majored in government.

Vickie M. Mays, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is a professor in the Department of Psychology in the College of Letters and Sciences, as well as a professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management. Professor Mays is also the director of the University of California, Los Angeles, Center on Research, Education, Training, and Strategic Communication on Minority Health Disparities. She teaches courses on health status and health behaviors of racial and ethnic minority groups, research ethics in biomedical and behavioral research in racial/ethnic minority populations, research methods in minority research, as well as courses on social determinants of mental disorders and psychopathology. She holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology and an M.S.P.H. in health services, with postdoctoral training in psychiatric epidemiology, survey research as it applies to ethnic minorities (University of Michigan) and health policy (RAND). Professor Mays’ research primarily focuses on the mental and physical health disparities affecting racial and ethnic minority populations. She has a long history of research and policy development in the area of contextual factors that surround HIV/AIDS in racial and ethnic minorities. This work ranges from looking at barriers to education and services to understanding racial-based immunological differences that may contribute to health outcome disparities. Other areas of research include looking at the role of perceived and actual discrimination on mental and physical health outcomes, particularly as these factors impact downstream disease outcomes. Her mental health research examines availability, access, and quality of mental health services for racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities. She is the co-principal investigator of the California

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

Quality of Life Survey, a population-based study of more than 2,200 Californians on the prevalence of mental health disorders and the contextual factors associated with those disorders.

James A. Mercy, Ph.D., is a special adviser for strategic directions at the Division of Violence Prevention in the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He began working at CDC in a newly formed activity to examine violence as a public health problem and, over the past two decades, has helped to develop the public health approach to violence and has conducted and overseen numerous studies of the epidemiology of youth suicide, family violence, homicide, and firearm injuries. Dr. Mercy also served as a co-editor of the World Report on Violence and Health prepared by the World Health Organization (WHO) and served on the editorial board of the United Nation’s Secretary General’s Study of Violence Against Children. Most recently he has been working on a global partnership with UNICEF, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, WHO, and others to end sexual violence against girls. His recent publications include “Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Conduct Disorder, and Young Adult Intimate Partner Violence” (Archives of General Psychiatry, 2010) and “Sexual Violence and Its Health Consequences for Female Children in Swaziland: A Cluster Survey Study” (Lancet, 2009).

Klaus A. Miczek, Ph.D., is the Moses Hunt Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry, Pharmacology, and Neuroscience at Tufts University. He has served on research review committees for the National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse (NIAAA), and National Center for Research Resources. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences panel on “Understanding and Preventing Violence” (1989–1992), as well as its ILAR/NRC panel on the “Psychological Well-Being of Primates.” He has been the coordinating and principal editor of Psychopharmacology since 1992, and he serves on the editorial board of half a dozen other journals in this area. He was the president of the Division of Psychopharmacology, and of the Behavioral Pharmacology Society, and chaired the Committee on Animals in Research and Ethics of the American Psychology Association. He has received numerous prizes including the Solvay Duphar Award of the Division of Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse of the American Psychological Association, a MERIT award from NIAAA, and Silver Medals of the Charles University (Czech Republic). In 1997, the president of the Federal Republic of Germany bestowed the Knight’s Cross of the Order of Merit on him. Dr. Miczek was named the Boerhaave professor at the medical faculty of Leiden University (Netherlands) and was a two-time Japan

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

International Science and Technology Fellow at the University of Tokyo. He was visiting professor at La Sapienza University in Rome, the Charles University in Prague, and at the University of Tuebingen in Germany. In 2006, Tufts University recognized Dr. Miczek with the Distinguished Scholar Award, and he was elected fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He published some 200 research journal articles and 40 reviews, and edited 20 volumes on psychopharmacological research concerning brain mechanisms of aggression, anxiety, social stress, and abuse of alcohol and other drugs. He was originally educated in Berlin (Germany) and received his Ph.D. in biopsychology from the University of Chicago. Currently, the work in Dr. Miczek’s laboratory investigates two problems in the areas of (1) stress and drug abuse, and (2) behavioral neurobiology of aggression. First, members of the laboratory aim to learn about neuroadaptive mechanisms via which specific social stressors can intensify compulsive drug use or alternatively engender depressive-like anhedonia. Second, they are seeking to characterize the neurobiological features of those individuals who engage in escalated aggression after alcohol consumption.

Margaret M. Murray, Ph.D., M.S.W., is the director of the Global Alcohol Research Program, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institutes of Health. Dr. Murray directs NIAAA’s efforts in international research collaboration spanning each of the Institute’s priorities in biomedical, epidemiological, prevention, and treatment research. This includes serving on U.S. Science and Technology Committees, NIH, and government-wide initiatives in global health, and representing NIAAA to multilateral organizations such as WHO. She is primarily responsible for facilitating collaborative relationships at the individual institute and scientist level. Dr. Murray is also a lecturer at the National Catholic School of Social Service at Catholic University, where she teaches the foundation courses in social welfare policy in the master of social work program.

Toben Nelson, Sc.D., is a primary faculty member of the Alcohol Epidemiology Program at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. He has research interests in health policy, organizational change, health behavior during developmental transitions, social determinants of health, program evaluation, prevention of alcohol-attributable harm, violence prevention, and motor vehicle safety.

Dustin Pardini, Ph.D., conducts research that involves elucidating the precursors and outcomes associated with the development of antisocial behavior (e.g., violence, theft) from childhood to adulthood, as well as evaluating the impact that early psychosocial interventions can have on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

these problems. Much of this work has focused on the development and treatment of conduct problems among youth exhibiting callous and unemotional (CU) traits. Over the past 8 years, this has involved analyzing data from two of the most extensive longitudinal studies ever conducted within the United States: the Pittsburgh Youth Study (co-director) and the Pittsburgh Girls Study. Dr. Pardini’s innovative research directly influences the adoption of the new conduct disorder specifier based on the presence of CU traits (called limited prosocial emotions) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), and earned him the Early Career Contribution Award from the Society of the Scientific Study of Psychopathy (2013). He is currently serving as a consultant to members of the Conduct Disorders Research Committee for the eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). He has also been involved in research designed to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for children exhibiting early aggression, including the Stop Now and Plan (SNAP) and the Resources to Enhance the Adjustment of Children (REACH) programs.

Michael Phillips, M.D., M.P.H., is currently the director of the Suicide Research and Prevention Center of the Shanghai Mental Health Center, executive director of the WHO Collaborating Center for Research and Training in Suicide Prevention at Beijing Hui Long Guan Hospital, professor of psychiatry and global health at Emory University, professor of clinical psychiatry and clinical epidemiology at Columbia University, vice chairperson of the Chinese Society for Injury Prevention and Control, and treasurer of the International Association for Suicide Prevention. He is currently the principal investigator on a number of multicenter collaborative projects on suicide, depression, and schizophrenia. His recent publications include “Repetition of Suicide Attempts: Data from Emergency Care Settings in Five Culturally Different Low- and Middle-Income Countries Participating in the WHO SUPRE-MISS Study” (Crisis, 2010) and “Nonfatal Suicidal Behavior Among Chinese Women Who Have Been Physically Abused by Their Male Intimate Partners” (Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 2009). Dr. Phillips is a Canadian citizen who has been a permanent resident of China for more than 25 years. He runs a number of research training courses each year; supervises Chinese and foreign graduate students; helps coordinate WHO mental health activities in China; promotes increased awareness of the importance of addressing China’s huge suicide problem; and advocates improving the quality, comprehensiveness, and access to mental health services around the country.

Mark L. Rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P., is the executive director of the Task Force for Global Health. Previously, for 20 years, Dr. Rosenberg was at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he led its work

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

in violence prevention and later became the first permanent director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. He also held the position of special assistant for behavioral science in the Office of the Deputy Director (HIV/AIDS). Dr. Rosenberg is board certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine with training in public policy. He is on the faculty at Morehouse Medical School, Emory Medical School, and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Rosenberg’s research and programmatic interests are concentrated on injury control and violence prevention, HIV/AIDS, and child well-being, with special attention to behavioral sciences, evaluation, and health communications. He has authored more than 120 publications and recently co-authored the book Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed (University of California Press, 2010). Dr. Rosenberg has received numerous awards including the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. Dr. Rosenberg’s organization, the Task Force for Global Health, participated in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine–sponsored workshop Violence Prevention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Finding a Place on the Global Agenda, and the Task Force remains interested in helping to continue the momentum of the workshop through the Forum on Global Violence Prevention. The Task Force is heavily involved in the delivery of a number of global health programs and sees many ways in which interpersonal violence and conflict exacerbate serious health problems and inequities.

Harvey Rosenthal has more than 38 years of experience working to promote public mental health services and policies that advance the recovery, rehabilitation, rights, and community inclusion of people with psychiatric disabilities. Since 1993, Mr. Rosenthal has served as the executive director of the New York Association of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services (NYAPRS), a peer-led consumer-provider partnership that has worked to improve services, social conditions, and public policies in New York and nationally that touch the lives of people with psychiatric disabilities. Under his leadership, NYAPRS has supported a strong grassroots advocacy community, developed recovery training programs for community providers, and has created nationally replicated peer-service and economic development innovations. Mr. Rosenthal is currently providing a broad array of training and technical assistance nationally to promote peer-run and recovery services. He regularly works to fight stigma, discrimination, and coercion and to expand informed choice protections. Mr. Rosenthal currently serves on the board of the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, acts as co-chair of the Peer Leaders Interest Group for ACMHA: the College for Behavioral Health Leadership, and is a member of the consumer-survivor subcommittee to the Center Mental Health Services

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

Advisory Group. He is a member of New York’s Medicaid Redesign Team and its Most Integrated Settings Coordinating Council. His interest in promoting mental health recovery is also personal, dating back to his own hospitalization at age 19.

Elyn R. Saks, Ph.D., J.D., specializes in mental health law, criminal law, and children and the law. Her recent research focused on ethical dimensions of psychiatric research and forced treatment of the mentally ill. She teaches Mental Health Law, Mental Health Law and the Criminal Justice System, and Advanced Family Law: The Rights and Interests of Children. She served as the University of Southern California (USC) Law’s associate dean for research from 2005 to 2010 and also teaches at the Institute of Psychiatry and the Law at the Keck School of Medicine at USC and is an adjunct professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego. Professor Saks was a 2009 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation fellowship and in fall 2010 announced she is using funds from the “Genius Grant” to create the Saks Institute for Mental Health Law, Policy, and Ethics. The Institute spotlights one important mental health issue per academic year and is a collaborative effort that includes faculty from seven USC departments: law, psychiatry, psychology, social work, gerontology, philosophy, and engineering. Professor Saks recently published The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness (Hyperion, 2007), a memoir about her struggles and successes with schizophrenia and acute psychosis. Other publications include Refusing Care: Forced Treatment and the Rights of the Mentally Ill (University of Chicago Press, 2002), Interpreting Interpretation: The Limits of Hermeneutic Psychoanalysis (Yale University Press, 1999), and Jekyll on Trial: Multiple Personality Disorder and Criminal Law (with Stephen H. Behnke, New York University Press, 1997). Before joining the USC Law faculty in 1989, Professor Saks was an attorney in Connecticut and an instructor at the University of Bridgeport School of Law. She graduated summa cum laude from Vanderbilt University before earning her master of letters from Oxford University and her J.D. from Yale Law School, where she also edited the Yale Law Journal. She holds a Ph.D. in psychoanalytic science from the New Center for Psychoanalysis. Professor Saks is a member of Phi Beta Kappa; an affiliate member of the American Psychoanalytic Association; a board member of Mental Health Advocacy Services; and a member of the Los Angeles Psychoanalytic Foundation, Robert J. Stoller Foundation, and American Law Institute. Professor Saks won both the Associate’s Award for Creativity in Research and Scholarship and the Phi Kappa Phi Faculty Recognition Award in 2004.

Kimberly A. Scott, M.S.P.H., has been a senior program officer on the Health and Medicine Division’s Board on Global Health since September

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

2005. She currently directs two forums: one on Global Violence Prevention and the other on Public–Private Partnerships for Global Health and Safety. She is also co-directing a workshop on Evaluation Methods for Large-Scale, Complex, Multinational Global Health Initiatives. From 2009 to 2013, she was the study co-director for the outcome and impact evaluation of the U.S. global HIV/AIDS initiative (i.e., the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR). Her portfolio of work for the National Academies also includes a mix of consensus studies, workshops, and other activities, including the Evaluation of the Implementation of PEPFAR; Preventing Violence in Low- and Middle-Income Countries; the Assessment of the Role of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Infants; Depression, Parenting Practices, and the Health Development of Children; and Achieving Global Sustainable Surveillance for Zoonotic Diseases. Before joining the National Academies, she was an analyst on the health care team at the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Before returning to graduate school, she coordinated a foundation-funded program at Duke University’s Center for Health Policy, Law, and Management to integrate public and private mental health services with the continuum of care for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS in 54 counties in North Carolina. For 6 years, she served as the executive director of a Ryan White–funded HIV/AIDS consortium, developing a comprehensive ambulatory care system for 21 mostly rural counties in North Carolina. Previous North Carolina health-related committee service includes several advisory committees to the governor of North Carolina and to the secretary of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services for programmatic and policy issues related to HIV care, prevention, and treatment, as well as substance abuse prevention and treatment. She received an M.S.P.H. in health policy analysis from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. As an Echols Scholar, she completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Virginia.

Sharon Stephan, Ph.D., is a leading figure in advancing school mental health (SMH) research, training, policy, and practice at national, state, and local levels. Dr. Stephan is a licensed clinical psychologist and a tenured associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. After providing direct mental health promotion and treatment service for several years in the Baltimore City Public Schools, Dr. Stephan was appointed as director of research for the national Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) in 2002. From 2005 to 2010, she guided the advancement of research and policy in her role as the CSMH director of research and analysis, and in 2010 became the CSMH principal investigator and co-director with Dr. Nancy Lever. Dr. Stephan has extensive expertise and leadership related to implementation science, quality assessment and improvement, evaluation and outcome

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

measurement, and SMH service delivery, workforce development, and state and local capacity building. Her evaluation and project direction experience is extensive, having served as the principal investigator, site principal investigator, or lead evaluator for several projects including two SAMHSA Systems of Care evaluations; the SAMHSA Healthy Transitions Initiative evaluation; two R01s from NIMH on Enhancing SMH Quality; Maryland’s Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation Evaluation; the National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) Mental Health Education and Training Initiative; Youth Moving Others Through Voices of Experience; Maryland’s Governor’s Office for Children Evidence-Based Practices Fidelity and Outcomes Evaluation; and the Baltimore SMH Initiative. Dr. Stephan has published extensively, with many peer-reviewed articles and editorial service, and is a highly regarded and sought after speaker and trainer. She has held leadership roles on several national committees, including the SAMHSA Federal-National partnership, the National Evidence-Based Practice Consortium, the National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety (NCCSHS), the CDC SMH Capacity Building Project, the National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (Evaluation and Quality Panel, Training and Technical Assistance Panel), and the SAMHSA National Child Traumatic Stress Network Trauma Services Adaptation Center for Schools (School Treatment Workgroup and Military Families Workgroup).

Daniel W. Webster, Sc.D., M.P.H., is a professor of health policy and management and directs the Ph.D. program in Health and Public Policy at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Webster is director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research, deputy director for research for the Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence, and core faculty of the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy. Dr. Webster holds a joint appointment as professor in the School of Education’s Division of Public Safety Leadership at Johns Hopkins, and is a senior research fellow with the Police Executive Research Forum. Dr. Webster is one of the nation’s leading experts on firearm policy and the prevention of gun violence. He is co-editor of Reducing Gun Violence in America: Informing Policy with Evidence and Analysis (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013). He has published numerous articles on firearm policy, youth gun acquisition and carrying, the prevention of gun violence, intimate partner violence, and adolescent violence prevention. He has studied the effects of several violence prevention interventions, including state firearm and alcohol policies, policing strategies, street outreach and conflict mediation, public education campaigns, and school-based curricula. Dr. Webster teaches Understanding and Preventing Violence, Research and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

Evaluation Methods for Health Policy, and graduate seminar in health and public policy.

David B. Wexler, Ph.D., is a professor of law and director of the International Network on Therapeutic Jurisprudence at the University of Puerto Rico in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Distinguished Research Professor of Law, Rogers College of Law, Tucson, Arizona. He received the American Psychiatric Association’s Manfred S. Guttmacher Forensic Psychiatry Award; chaired the American Bar Association’s Commission on Mental Disability and the Law; chaired the Association of American Law Schools’ Section on Law and Mental Disability; chaired the Advisory Board of the National Center for State Courts’ Institute on Mental Disability and Law; was a member of the Panel on Legal Issues of the President’s Commission on Mental Health; was a member of the National Commission on the Insanity Defense; served as vice president of the International Academy of Law and Mental Health; received the New York University School of Law Distinguished Alumnus Legal Scholarship/Teaching Award; received the Distinguished Service Award from the National Center for State Courts; and served as a member of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Mental Health and the Law. Dr. Wexler has been named an Honorary Distinguished Member of the American Psychology-Law Society. In October 2012, at its Congress in Pontevedra, Galicia, Spain, Dr. Wexler was named Honorary President of the Iberoamerican Association of Therapeutic Jurisprudence, an organization headquartered at the University of Vigo. Therapeutic jurisprudence writing is now in 10 languages, and some of Dr. Wexler’s own work has been translated to Hebrew, Portuguese, Spanish, and Urdu. He is a consultant on therapeutic jurisprudence to the National Judicial Institute of Canada and the Judicial Academy of Puerto Rico, and has served as a Fulbright Senior Specialist, lecturing on therapeutic jurisprudence in Australia and New Zealand. Before entering law teaching, Dr. Wexler practiced for the Criminal Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. He first explicated the therapeutic jurisprudence perspective in a paper written in 1987. He and Professor Bruce Winick of the University of Miami worked together to further develop the area, which is now of interest to practitioners and academics of many disciplines and nations.

Dieter Wolke, Ph.D., studied at the University of Kiel in Germany and obtained his Ph.D. from the University of London Faculty of Science. He has worked at different colleges of the University of London (i.e., Institute of Education; King’s College; and the Institute of Child Health, Hospital for Sick Children) and the Universities of Munich, Hertfordshire (chair), Bristol (chair in lifespan psychology, and deputy director of the Avon Longitudinal Study [ALSPAC]), and was guest professor of the University of Zurich and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×

scientific director of the Jacobs Foundation, Zurich (2004–2006) before joining the University of Warwick. Dr. Wolke is currently professor of developmental psychology and individual differences in the Department of Psychology (Faculty of Science) and in the Division of Mental Health and Well-being (Warwick Medical School) at the University of Warwick. He is the lead of the Lifespan Health and Well-being Research Stream in the Department of Psychology. Much of his research is interdisciplinary (psychology, social, and medical sciences), longitudinal, and in the field of developmental psychopathology. His major research topics are (1) peer or sibling victimization (bullying): precursors, consequences, and interventions; (2) early regulatory problems in infancy and their long-term consequences; (3) how preterm birth affects brain development, psychological development, and quality of life. He is involved as principal investigator/co-principal investigator in a range of follow-up studies in the United Kingdom and Germany, including the ALSPAC cohort, EPICure Study, the Bavarian Longitudinal Study, and the U.K. Household Longitudinal Study (Understanding Society), which is the largest longitudinal panel study in the world, including more than 100,000 people with a special interest in biomarkers. Dr. Wolke has published more than 200 articles in leading journals and is on the editorial boards of several journals and several scientific advisory boards.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Violence and Mental Health: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Detection: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24916.
×
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On February 26–27, 2014, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Forum on Global Violence Prevention convened a workshop titled Mental Health and Violence: Opportunities for Prevention and Early Intervention. The workshop brought together advocates and experts in public health and mental health, anthropology, biomedical science, criminal justice, global health and development, and neuroscience to examine experience, evidence, and practice at the intersection of mental health and violence. Participants explored how violence impacts mental health and how mental health influences violence and discussed approaches to improve research and practice in both domains. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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