National Academies Press: OpenBook

Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop (2018)

Chapter: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
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Appendix D

Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters

Sujeeta Bhatt (Study Director) is a senior program officer with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and study director for the Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security. She was formerly a research scientist at the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and was detailed to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s High-Value Detainee Interrogation Group (HIG). Prior to that, she was an assistant professor in the Department of Radiology at the Georgetown University Medical Center on detail to DIA/HIG. Her work at DIA and HIG entailed identifying knowledge gaps and developing and managing research projects to address those gaps. Her work in the Intelligence Community focused on the psychological and neuroscience bases for credibility assessment, biometrics, insider threat, intelligence interviewing and interrogation methods, and the development of research-to-practice modules on interrogation-related topics to promote the use of evidence-based practice in interviews/interrogations. She holds a Ph.D. in behavioral neuroscience from American University.

Matthew E. Brashears (Committee Member) is an associate professor of sociology at the University of South Carolina. His work crosses levels, integrating ideas from evolutionary theory, social networks, organizational theory, and neuroscience. His current research focuses on linking cognition to social network structure, studying the effects of error and error correction on diffusion dynamics, and using ecological models to connect individual behavior to collective dynamics. He is also engaged in an effort to model values and interactional scripts in an ecological space using cross-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×

national data, with the goal of generating a predictive model of cultural competition and evolution. He earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Arizona.

Kathleen Carley (Committee Chair) is a professor of computer science in the Institute for Software Research and director of the Center for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems at Carnegie Mellon University. She is also CEO of Carley Technologies Inc., also known as Netanomics. Her research combines cognitive science, sociology, and computer science to address complex social and organizational issues. Her most notable research contribution was the establishment of dynamic network analysis (DNA) and the associated theory and methodology for examining large high-dimensional time-variant networks. Her research on DNA has resulted in tools for analyzing and visualizing large-scale dynamic networks and various multiagent simulation systems. She is the developer of a high-dimensional network analysis and visualization system, ORA, that supports network analytics in general for social media and for dynamic and geospatial networks. Her group has also developed tools for extracting sentiment, social, and semantic networks from social media and other textual data (AutoMap); simulating epidemiological models (BioWar); simulating covert networks (DyNet); and simulating changes in beliefs and practice given information campaigns (Construct). She is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University.

Guido Cervone (Presenter) is an associate director at the Institute for CyberScience and associate professor of geoinformatics at the Pennsylvania State University. He serves as co-chair of the Research Computing Cyber-Infrastructure Executive Committee. He also holds the appointments of affiliate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and adjunct faculty at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University. He serves as program co-chair for the Natural Hazards focus group of the American Geophysical Union and chair for the education and outreach advisory board of NCAR. His expertise is in geoinformatics, machine learning, and remote sensing, and his research focuses on the development and application of computational algorithms for the analysis of remote sensing, numerical modeling, and social media spatiotemporal “big data.” The main problem domains of his work are related to environmental hazards and renewable energy forecasting. He received his Ph.D. in computational science and informatics and M.S. and B.S. in computer science from George Mason University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×

Hsinchun Chen (Presenter) is Regents’ professor and Thomas R. Brown chair professor in management and technology at the University of Arizona. He recently served as lead program director of the Smart and Connected program at the National Science Foundation (2014–2015), a multiyear multiagency health information technology (IT) research program. He founded the Artificial Intelligence (AI) Lab at the University of Arizona and is a successful IT entrepreneur. His COPLINK/i2 system for security analytics was commercialized and acquired by IBM as its leading government analytics product. He has served as an advisor to major federal research programs and was a scientific counselor of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, the National Library of China, and Academia Sinica (Taiwan). He is a visiting chair professor at several major universities in China and Taiwan. He is internationally known for leading research and development in health analytics and security informatics. He is also a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received a B.S. from the National Chiao-Tung University in Taiwan, an M.B.A. from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in information systems from New York University.

Noshir Contractor (Committee Member) is Jane S. and William J. White professor of behavioral sciences in the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Communications, and the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. He is the director of the Science of Networks in Communities research center. He is investigating factors that lead to the formation, maintenance, and dissolution of dynamically linked social and knowledge networks in a wide variety of contexts. He received the National Communication Association Distinguished Scholar Award in 2014 and was elected a fellow of the International Communication Association in 2015. He is the co-founder and chairman of Syndio, which offers to organizations products and services based on network analytics. He holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and a Ph.D. in communications from the Annenberg School of Communication, University of Southern California.

Leslie DeChurch (Presenter) is professor of communication studies and psychology at Northwestern University. Her research addresses teamwork and leadership in organizations. She is currently investigating the dynamics through which teams form and how these dynamics affect their performance as teams and their ability to work as larger organizational systems (multiteam systems). She is the president of INGRoup (Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research) and fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×

Industrial and Organizational Psychology. She holds a Ph.D. in organizational psychology.

Emily Falk (Committee Member) is an associate professor of communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, with secondary appointments in psychology and marketing at the University of Pennsylvania. She employs a variety of methods in her research, with a focus on functional magnetic resonance imaging. She has worked to develop a program of research in what she calls “communication neuroscience” to link neural activity (in response to persuasive messages) to behaviors at the individual, group, and population levels. She is also interested in the development of “neural focus groups” to predict the efficacy of persuasive communication at the population level. At present, much of her research focuses on health communication; other areas of interest include political communication, cross-cultural communication, and the spread of culture, social norms, and “sticky” ideas. She received her B.S. in neuroscience from Brown University and her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Scott Feld (Presenter) is a professor of sociology at Purdue University. His ongoing research interests include causes and consequences of patterns in social networks, processes of individual and collective decision making, and applications of sociology, most recently including innovations in marriage and divorce laws (covenant marriage). He regularly teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on social networks, research methods, and statistics. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Social Relations at Johns Hopkins University.

Benjamin Golub (Presenter) is an assistant professor in the department of economics at Harvard University. His research in economic theory focuses on social and economic networks. His work has examined the dynamics of information and influence around learning and gossip, coordination in organizations, financial contagion, and cooperation and negotiations in complex favor-trading problems, such as pollution reduction. He received his B.S. in mathematics from Caltech and his Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University.

Jesse Hoey (Presenter) is an associate professor in the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo, where he leads the Computational Health Informatics Laboratory. He is also an adjunct scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute in Toronto, Canada, where he is co-leader of the AI and Robotics Research Team. He works on problems in computational social science, probabilistic and decision theoretic automated reasoning, affective computing, rehabilitation science, and ubiq-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×

uitous computing. Much of his work has focused on developing systems to help persons with a cognitive disability (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease) to engage in activities of daily living. His recent funded research includes a multinational grant from the Trans-Atlantic Partnership to investigate social coordination in online collaborative networks. He was program chair for the 10th European Alliance for Innovation International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare and chair of the Technology Professional Interest Area of the Alzheimer’s Association International Society to Advance Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment. He is a network investigator for the AGEWELL Network of Centers of Excellence. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of British Columbia.

David A. Honey (Sponsor) serves as director of science and technology and as assistant deputy director of national intelligence for science and technology in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. He is responsible for the development of effective strategies, policies, and programs that lead to the successful integration of science and technology capabilities into operational systems. Prior to this assignment, he served as deputy assistant secretary of defense, research, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense. He was director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Strategic Technology Office, director of the Advanced Technology Office, and deputy director and program manager of the Microsystems Technology Office. He is a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel who began his military career as a pilot. He received a Ph.D. in solid state science from Syracuse University.

Kenneth Joseph (Presenter) is a postdoctoral fellow at the Network Science Institute, Northeastern University, and a fellow at Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science. He will soon join the computer science department at the University of Buffalo. His research focuses on gaining a better understanding of the dynamics and cognitive representations of stereotypes and prejudice and their interrelationships with sociocultural structure and social interaction. In his work, he leverages a variety of machine learning/natural-language processing methods, agent-based modeling strategies, and sociocognitive theories. He completed his graduate work in the societal computing program at Carnegie Mellon University.

Regina Joseph(Presenter) is the founder of Sibylink, an international consultancy based in The Hague, and co-founder of pytho, a U.S.-based decision-science consultancy. Both organizations provide strategic foresight through quantitative forecasting, training programs, and development of digital solutions. She is a superforecaster for the Intelligence Advanced

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×

Research Projects Activity’s (IARPA) Aggregative Contingent Estimation Program and was a senior consultant on the IARPA-funded Good Judgment Project research team. She also serves as a member of the faculty at New York University. She is a political scientist whose work and research assist public- and private-sector organizations. Her most recent endeavors include launching the world’s first cross-agency forecasting tournament for the government of The Netherlands as part of Sibylink’s proprietary strategic foresight training program; the invention of digital tools such as neuertm, a quantified structural analytic technique (patent pending), and InfoRank, an information reliability index; the development of a cyber-threat forecasting platform; and further IARPA-funded research on the development of hybrid human–machine model forecasting systems. She is a Thomas J. Watson fellow and holds a B.A. from Hamilton College and an M.S. from New York University.

Markus Mobius (Committee Member) is a principal researcher at Microsoft. His research deals with the economics of social networks. On the theory side, he builds models of learning, coordination, and cooperation within social networks. He is particularly interested in how social networks can generate trust. On the empirical side, he uses a combination of laboratory and field experiments with real social networks to estimate these models. In a second line of research, he has explored how people manage their self-confidence when ego is at stake. He also investigates the use of browsing data to analyze the economics of online news consumption. Formerly, he was an associate professor of economics at Harvard University. He received his B.A. in mathematics and an M.Phil. in economics from Oxford University and his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

James Moody (Committee Member) is a professor of sociology at Duke University. He has published extensively in the field of social networks, methods, and social theory. His work has focused theoretically on the network foundations of social cohesion and diffusion, with a particular emphasis on building tools and methods for understanding dynamic social networks. He has used network models to help understand school racial segregation, adolescent health, disease spread, economic development, and the development of scientific disciplines. He holds a B.S. from the University of Oregon and an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Zachary Neal (Presenter) is an associate professor of psychology and global urban studies at Michigan State University. His research focuses on multiple scales of urban networks, ranging from microscale social networks among

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×

residents within neighborhoods to macroscale economic and transportation networks between cities. He also works to develop new network analytic methods, with a particular focus on bipartite networks and their projections. He was the 2016–2017 recipient of the Freeman Award from the International Network for Social Network Analysis. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in sociology from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Carolyn Parkinson (Presenter) is an assistant professor of psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research integrates theory and methods from social psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and social network analysis. Her current work is concerned primarily with better understanding the mental architecture involved in encoding the structure of social networks and the cognitive and behavioral consequences of this structure. By combining the systematic characterization of patterns of real-world social relationships with methods for assessing information processing within individual brains, this line of research is aimed at providing insight into interactions between social networks and human cognition. She received her B.Sc. in psychology from McGill University and her Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience from Dartmouth College.

Randolph H. Pherson (Presenter) has been developing and teaching structured analytic techniques and critical thinking and writing skills to analysts throughout the intelligence, homeland security, and defense communities, as well as in the private sector and overseas. As CEO of Globalytica, LLC, he has developed and taught courses in more than two dozen countries and facilitated more than a dozen strategic foresight workshops, and he recently launched a new online critical thinking course. He also is president of Pherson Associates, which supports U.S. Intelligence Community programs, and founding director of the nonprofit Forum Foundation for Analytic Excellence. He worked as an analyst and manager in the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) for 28 years, last serving as national intelligence officer (NIO) for Latin America. While at the CIA, he worked on the inspector general’s staff, developed a strategic planning process for the agency, and served as deputy executive director. He received the Distinguished Intelligence Medal for his service as NIO for Latin America and the Distinguished Career Intelligence Medal. He holds an A.B. from Dartmouth College and an M.A. in international relations from Yale University.

Paul Sackett (Decadal Survey Chair) is Beverly and Richard Fink distinguished professor of psychology and liberal arts at the University of Minnesota. His research interests revolve around various aspects of testing and assessment in workplace, educational, and military settings. He has served as president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychol-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×

ogy, as co-chair of the committee producing the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, as a member of the National Academies Board on Testing and Assessment, as chair of the American Psychological Association’s (APA’s) Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessments, and as chair of APA’s Board of Scientific Affairs. He holds a Ph.D. in industrial/organizational psychology from Ohio State University.

Alexander Volfovsky (Presenter) is an assistant professor of statistical science at Duke University. He joined the department after finishing a National Science Foundation mathematical sciences postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University. His research concentrates on developing theory and methodological tools for computational social science applications, with a particular focus on high-dimensional data and network analysis. He is interested in assessing fundamental assumptions, such as exchangeability and stochastic equivalence, that underlie many network models, and to this end has developed testing and estimation procedures for complex dependence structures among actors in a network. Recently, he has been working on tools for causal inference and missing-data problems where the existence of networks leads to a breakdown of traditional approaches. His work has been applied to friendship, protein and trade networks, health outcomes, and educational attainment. He received a joint B.S. in mathematics and M.S. in statistics from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Washington.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×
Page 58
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25057.
×
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Beginning in October 2017, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine organized a set of workshops designed to gather information for the Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security. The third workshop focused on advances in social network thinking, and this publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from this workshop.

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