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Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness (2018)

Chapter: Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
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Appendix A

Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information

KENNETH W. KIZER (NAM) (Chair) is a distinguished professor in the University of California (UC), Davis, School of Medicine and the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, and director of the Institute for Population Health Improvement, UC Davis Health. Among other positions, he also serves as the chief medical Officer, California Department of Managed Health Care; Director, California Cancer Reporting and Epidemiologic Surveillance Program; and chief quality improvement consultant, Medi-Cal Quality Improvement Program, California Department of Health Care Services. Kizer is a highly seasoned physician executive whose professional experience includes positions in the public and private sectors, academia and philanthropy. His previous positions include: founding president and chief executive officer, National Quality Forum, a Washington, DC-based quality improvement and consensus standards setting organization; president, CEO and chairman, Medsphere Systems Corporation, a leading provider of open source health information technology; under secretary for Health, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and chief executive officer of the nation’s largest health care system; director, California Department of Health Services; and director, California Emergency Medical Services Authority. He has served on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and as chairman of the Board, The California Wellness Foundation, as well as on the governing boards of managed care and health IT companies, foundations, professional associations and non-profit organizations. He is an honors graduate of Stanford University and UCLA, the recipient of two honorary doctorates, and a fellow or distinguished fellow of 11 professional societies, including being an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. He is board certified in six medical specialties and or sub-specialties, and has authored over 400 original articles, book chapters and other reports. He has been selected as one of the “100 Most Powerful People in Health care” by Modern Healthcare magazine on several occasions, and his work has been featured in Time, BusinessWeek, Fortune, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and numerous other magazines, newspapers and national television

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×

shows. He has served on numerous National Academy of Medicine committees and boards.

BARBARA L. BRUSH is the Carol J. and F. Edward Lake Professor in Population Health, Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, University of Michigan School of Nursing. Her interests include family homelessness, community-based participatory research, health disparity/inequity, international nurse migration, and nurse workforce policy. The author of two books and over sixty peer-reviewed journal articles, Brush has focused her research on promoting health and reducing health inequality among vulnerable and community-based populations. An advanced practice nurse (APN) and proponent of interprofessional primary care practice, she created one of the nation’s first clinical practice models utilizing APNs and ministers to care for homeless men. She has also been part of a longstanding team designing APN care delivery models and measuring their outcomes in nursing home settings. Her current research with homeless families in Detroit utilizes a community-based participatory research approach to address the health and social needs of this vulnerable population. A nurse historian with advanced policy training, Brush also examines important issues in nurse workforce development and capacity building. She is a leading expert in nurse migration and has explored the United States’ long practice of recruiting internationally educated nurses to fill nurse shortfall in hospitals and nursing homes. This work has informed national and international policies on the ethical recruitment of internationally educated nurses and approaches to measure safety and quality care practices. Brush received her Ph.D. and M.S.N. from University of Pennsylvania and her B.S.N. from Southeastern Massachusetts University.

SEIJI HAYASHI is the director of Medicine at the Human Diagnosis Project (Human Dx), an online system that combines clinician expertise and artificial intelligence to improve diagnostic and treatment accuracy, access and affordability with a special emphasis on vulnerable populations. He is also a board-certified family physician practicing at a community health center in Washington, DC. Hayashi is an experienced leader in quality improvement, practice transformation, and health policy at the local and national levels. As a family physician, he has spent 20 years working in and with community health centers that care for the nation’s most vulnerable patients and families. Prior to Human Dx, he was executive vice president for Transformation and Innovation at Unity Health Care, one of the nation’s largest community health centers and health care for the homeless programs. Unity provides quality care to more than 106,000 patients in under-served areas of the District of Columbia. Hayashi also served as chief medical officer for the Bureau of Primary Health Care at the Health Resources and Services Administration where he oversaw the clinical quality strategy for the $5.1 billion federal Health Center Program that cares for 24 million individuals across the United States, including 1.3 million individuals experiencing homelessness. Hayashi graduated with honors from Vassar College, received his M.D. with Alpha Omega Alpha distinction from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×

an M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. He completed his residency training in family medicine from the University of California at San Francisco and was a fellow with the Commonwealth Fund/Harvard University Fellowship in Minority Health Policy.

STEPHEN HWANG is the director of the Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St. Michael’s Hospital, and a professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto. Hwang holds the chair in Housing, Homelessness, and Health at St. Michael’s Hospital and the University of Toronto. He practices general internal medicine at St. Michael’s Hospital and at Seaton House (one of Canada’s largest homeless shelters). Previously, he was a physician with the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program from 1992 to 1996. Hwang joined the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto in 1996 and served as the Director of the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Toronto from 2005 to 2016. Hwang’s research focuses on improving the health of people who are homeless or vulnerably housed and deepening our understanding of housing as a social determinant of health. His current research projects include an observational cohort study of health and housing transitions among homeless and vulnerably housed adults in Toronto, Ottawa, and Vancouver; and the At Home/Chez Soi study, a randomized controlled trial of rent subsidies and mental health supports for individuals who are homeless and have mental health issues. His research has brought attention to the severe health risks faced by people who are homeless and vulnerably housed in Canada. Hwang completed his undergraduate training at Harvard University, his M.D. at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a master of public health degree at the Harvard School of Public Health.

MITCHELL KATZ (NAM) is the president and chief executive officer of NYC Health + Hospitals. Previously, Katz was the director of the Los Angeles County Health Agency, an integration of the Departments of Health Services, Mental Health, and Public Health. He oversaw a $7.0 billion annual budget and 28,000 employees, and focused on development of integrated care models for persons with mental illness, substance use, and physical illness. He was appointed director of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (DHS) in 2011 and oversaw the transformation of that system from an emergency and episodic based system, to a system focused on longitudinal outpatient care with strong linkages to the four inpatient hospitals. Under his leadership DHS has enpaneled 450,000 persons into patient centered medical homes, created an electronic consultation system to decrease waiting times for specialty care, and housed more than 1,500 chronically homeless persons in supportive housing. Prior to joining DHS, Katz served as director of Health and Health Officer for the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH) from 1997 to 2010. There, one of his signature accomplishments was creation of the “Healthy San Francisco” initiative that established primary care medical homes for the city’s vulnerable residents that improved

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×

health outcomes. Earlier, he served as SFDPH Director of Community Health and Safety from 1996 to 1997 and Director of the AIDS Office from 1992-1997. Dr. Katz received a B.S. degree from Yale University and M.D. from Harvard Medical School. He completed his residency in Primary Care Internal Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and is a practicing internist.

MAHASIN MUJAHID is an associate professor of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. As a social epidemiologist, Mujahid employs interdisciplinary and community-based approaches to investigations of racial/ethnic and place-based health disparities. Her primary area of research examines how features of neighborhood environments impact cardiovascular health. Using data from several U.S. based cardiovascular cohorts, Mujahid seeks to improve the measurement of specific features of neighborhood physical and social environments and employs novel statistical methods to estimate neighborhood health effects. Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and has been published in leading public health and medical journals. Prior to joining the faculty at UC Berkeley, Mujahid earned a B.S. in Mathematics from Xavier University, New Orleans LA, and an M.S. in Biostatistics and Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She was also a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at Harvard University.

JAMES O’CONNELL is the president of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program. O’Connell graduated summa cum laude from the University of Notre Dame in 1970 and received his master’s degree in theology from Cambridge University in 1972. After graduating from Harvard Medical School in 1982, he completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In 1985, O’Connell began fulltime clinical work with homeless individuals as the founding physician of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), which now serves over 12,000 homeless persons each year in two hospital-based clinics (Boston Medical Center and MGH) and in more than 70 shelters and outreach sites in Boston. With his colleagues, O’Connell established the nation’s first medical respite program for homeless persons in September 1985, with 25 beds in the Lemuel Shattuck Shelter. This innovative program now provides acute and sub-acute, pre- and post-operative, and palliative and end-of-life care in BHCHP’s free-standing 104-bed Barbara McInnis House. Working with the MGH Laboratory of Computer Science, Dr. O’Connell designed and implemented the nation’s first computerized medical record for a homeless program in 1995. From 1989 until 1996, O’Connell served as the National Program Director of the Homeless Families Program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. O’Connell has been featured on ABC’s Nightline and in a feature-length documentary entitled “Give Me a Shot of Anything.” He has received numerous awards, including the Albert Schweitzer Humanitarian Award in 2012 and The Trustees’ Medal at the bicentennial celebration of MGH in 2011. O’Connell’s book, Stories from the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×

Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor was published in 2015 and was featured on NPR’s Fresh Air with Terri Gross. O’Connell is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and staff physician at Massachusetts General Hospital.

BARBARA SAMUELS is the managing attorney of the Fair Housing Project of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Maryland. The project’s mission is to use policy advocacy and litigation to expand housing choices and the supply of assisted housing in integrated neighborhoods throughout the Baltimore region. Samuels has been the lead ACLU counsel in Thompson v. HUD, a public housing desegregation case that is creating housing opportunities for families in low-poverty and racially integrated neighborhoods throughout Baltimore City and the metro region. Before joining the ACLU in 1993, Samuels was a legal services housing attorney in Baltimore and southwest Virginia for 13 years.

MARYBETH SHINN is Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor in the Department of Human and Organizational Development at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education and Human Development. She has research interests in homelessness, community contexts of human welfare, social policy, and social intervention. She is a former President of the Society for Community Research and Action and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, a fellow of both these organizations and of the Association for Psychological Science. She also chaired Peabody Department of Human and Organizational Department and the Psychology Department at New York University. Professor Shinn has received several awards for her teaching and research, including the Golden Dozen Teaching Award from New York University (2002), Ethnic/Minority Mentoring Award from the Society for Community Research and Action (1997), and the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Theory and Research from the Society for Community Research and Action (1996), and the Social Policy Edited Book Award from the Society for Research on Adolescence (2010). She has also served on two National Institutes of Health study sections (Social Science and Population Studies, Child/Adolescent Risk and Prevention), and twice served as associate editor of the American Journal of Community Psychology. Shinn received her B.A. (summa cum laude) in Social Relations from Radcliffe College, Harvard University, as well as her M.A. in Social Psychology and her Ph.D. in Community Psychology, Social Psychology from University of Michigan.

PING WANG is Seigle Family Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. His major research areas include growth and development, money and macroeconomics, economic theory, and spatial/health economics. He has published more than 80 research articles in refereed journals. Wang served as department chair at Vanderbilt during 2002-2005 and at Washington University in St. Louis during 2005-2008, vice president of the Chinese Economic Association in North America during 1991-1992, and president of the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×

Chinese Economic Association in North America in 2001 and president of the Midwest Economic Association in 2014. He is currently co-director of the Midwest Macro Group, vice president for Planning and Development of the East Asian Institute, research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), senior research fellow of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis and Asian Bureau of Finance and Economic Research, academician (National Academy Fellow of Taiwan), editor for Journal of Macroeconomics, associate editor for Economics Bulletin, Journal of Public Economic Theory, and Regional Science and Urban Economics. His current research focuses primarily on: micro-founded theory in growth and development; intertemporally and spatially redistributive policy; search and match models of labor, family, and technology; agglomeration of productive economic activities; labor market consequences of addiction/substance abuse and health/human capital investment decisions; positive and normative analysis of crime, corruption, casinos and networks; and economic integration, outsourcing, venture capital and institutions. Wang received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Rochester in May 1987, being affiliated with Penn State University from 1987 to 1998 and with Vanderbilt from 1999 to 2005.

SUZANNE WENZEL is Richard and Ann Thor Professor in Urban Social Development and chair of the Department of Adult Mental Health and Wellness in the Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work and Department of Psychology at University of Southern California (USC). Wenzel has served as the principal investigator on 10 grants from the National Institutes of Health. Her research involving homeless persons has included an investigation of the relationship of trauma to substance use and HIV/AIDS risk among women; examinations of the social context of risk for substance use and HIV/AIDS among women, men and youth; and adaption of evidence-based programs to address post-traumatic stress and to prevent victimization and risky sexual activity among women. She is also investigating the process and outcomes of transitioning to permanent supportive housing among persons experiencing chronic homelessness, and organized a Los Angeles County-wide forum on the topic of integrated care and housing for homeless persons. After completing her doctoral studies in community psychology at University of Texas at Austin, Wenzel was awarded a National Institute of Mental Health post-doctoral fellowship in the Rutgers/Princeton program in mental health research. Prior to her appointment at USC in 2009, she was a senior behavioral scientist at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. She is an elected fellow in the Association for Psychological Science and a fellow in the Western Psychological Association. She has authored/co-authored more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, has performed peer review service for multiple scholarly journals, and has served on review panels for the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and other national and international funding agencies.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×
Page 170
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×
Page 171
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×
Page 172
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×
Page 173
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Committee on an Evaluation of Permanent Supportive Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Permanent Supportive Housing: Evaluating the Evidence for Improving Health Outcomes Among People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25133.
×
Page 174
Next: Appendix B The History of Homelessness in the United States »
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Chronic homelessness is a highly complex social problem of national importance. The problem has elicited a variety of societal and public policy responses over the years, concomitant with fluctuations in the economy and changes in the demographics of and attitudes toward poor and disenfranchised citizens. In recent decades, federal agencies, nonprofit organizations, and the philanthropic community have worked hard to develop and implement programs to solve the challenges of homelessness, and progress has been made. However, much more remains to be done. Importantly, the results of various efforts, and especially the efforts to reduce homelessness among veterans in recent years, have shown that the problem of homelessness can be successfully addressed.

Although a number of programs have been developed to meet the needs of persons experiencing homelessness, this report focuses on one particular type of intervention: permanent supportive housing (PSH). Permanent Supportive Housing focuses on the impact of PSH on health care outcomes and its cost-effectiveness. The report also addresses policy and program barriers that affect the ability to bring the PSH and other housing models to scale to address housing and health care needs.

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