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Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers (2018)

Chapter: Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academy of Engineering. 2018. Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25284.
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Appendix G

Biographies of Committee Members

Jean-Lou Chameau (Chair; NAE) is president emeritus (2006–2013) of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). He then served as president of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia, guiding this private “startup university,” modeled after Caltech, on a path to excellence and leading the development of the campus and its surrounding community of members from over 80 nations. Before the presidency of Caltech, he had a distinguished career as a professor and administrator at Purdue University and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). After serving as director of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech, he left academia for the private sector, serving as president of Golder Associates, an international geotechnical consulting company. He then returned to Georgia Tech as a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar and vice provost for research. He went on to become dean of the college of engineering and then provost and vice president for academic affairs. Dr. Chameau is committed to fostering excellence in science and technology and promoting a multidisciplinary approach to research and education (“The Leader with the Midas Touch,” Times Higher Education, 2017). He has also promoted industry-university partnerships and the involvement of universities in economic development, including startups and new businesses, with an emphasis on advancing entrepreneurial and international opportunities for faculty and students. Early in his career, Dr. Chameau’s research focused on soil dynamics and earthquake engineering, extending to environmental geotechnology and sustainable technology in the late 1980s. He was a pioneer in sustainable technology and development beginning in 1991, incorporating the concept of sustainability in education and research to promote a more prosperous and sustainable society. He has received numerous awards for his research and contributions as an educator and academic leader. In his native France he was elected Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur, and he is a member of both the French Académie des Technologies and the US National Academy of Engineering. He has been active on industry and public boards, including those of InterWest, Internet2, John Wiley & Sons, KIMC, MTS Systems, Ma’aden, Safran, l’École Polytechnique, the US Council on Competitiveness, and the Academic Research Council of Singapore. Dr. Chameau received his undergraduate education from the École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts et Métiers and his PhD in civil engineering from Stanford University.

Rodney Adkins (Vice Chair; NAE) is president of 3RAM Group LLC, a privately held company specializing in capital investments, business consulting services, and property management. During his more than 33-year career at IBM, he held several senior vice president roles: Strategic Partnerships and Corporate Strategy (2013–2014), responsible for leading companywide transformation and developing strategies for a new era of computing, new

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academy of Engineering. 2018. Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25284.
×

markets, and new clients; Systems and Technology Group (STG; 2009–2013), responsible for all aspects of IBM’s semiconductor, server, storage, and system software businesses as well as its integrated supply chain and global business partners organizations; and STG Development and Manufacturing (2007–2009). He also held a number of development and management roles at IBM, including general manager positions for the PC Company, UNIX Systems, and Pervasive Computing. Mr. Adkins is a member of the Executive Leadership Council and National Society of Black Engineers, which in 2001 awarded him the Golden Torch Award for Lifetime Achievement in Industry. In 2011 Black Enterprise magazine chose him as its Corporate Executive of the Year, and in 2002 Fortune magazine named him one of the 50 Most Powerful Black Executives in America. He serves on the national board of the Smithsonian Institution and on the boards of directors for United Parcel Service (UPS) and the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering. He also serves on the Georgia Tech Foundation, Rollins College Board of Trustees, University of Maryland Baltimore County Board of Visitors, and University of Miami College of Engineering Visiting Committee. Mr. Adkins holds a BA in physics from Rollins College, BS and MS degrees in electrical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology, and honorary doctorates from the University of Maryland Baltimore County and Georgia Institute of Technology.

Eric Ducharme (NAE) is chief engineer at GE Aviation, responsible for airworthiness and certification, design process and quality, flight safety, and technical talent development for a global team of 6,500 engineers. He joined GE Aircraft Engines in 1987, leading the aeromechanical design of swept composite fan blades, resulting in their first successful engine applications. He also led the GE90-115B engineering program through FAA certification, and commercial engine new product development at GE Aviation, delivering on over $2B of development and certification programs for next-gen engines, including the LEAP-1A/-1B/-1C series and the Passport 20. Most recently he led Advanced Technology, responsible for a global team of 800 engineers delivering differentiated technologies and product architectures for next generation commercial and military flight propulsion. Dr. Ducharme was vice president, Global Technology at GE Transportation (2009–2014), a $6B business providing propulsion, power, and control solutions for rail, mining, and marine customers. There he led the development of the Evolution Series of locomotives. He is a member of the NASA Aeronautics Advisory Committee and past chair of the ASME Industry Advisory Board and GE’s University Executive aligned with MIT. Dr. Ducharme holds a BSc in mechanical engineering from McGill University, and a master’s and doctorate in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT.

Nadya Fouad is Distinguished Professor and Mary and Ted Kellner Endowed Chair of Educational Psychology, School of Education, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee (UWM). She also serves as special advisor to the provost for conflict resolution. Previously at UWM she was associate dean of the School of Education (1995–1998), chair of the Task Force on the Climate for Women, and chair of the Graduate Faculty Council. She is working on studies to examine the persistence of men and women in engineering careers and how gender and race affect innovation in engineering teams, and has published articles and chapters on cross-cultural vocational assessment, career development of women and racial/ethnic minorities, interest measurement, cross-cultural counseling, and race and ethnicity. Among her honors are the John Holland Award for Outstanding Achievement in Career and Personality Research (2003), Janet Helms Award for Mentoring and Scholarship (2009), APA Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training Award (2009), Paul Nelson Award by the Council of Chairs of Training Councils (2010), and Lifetime Achievement Award from the Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs (CCPTP; 2013). She was president of APA Division 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology; 2000–2001), chair of the APA Ethics Committee (2011), CCPTP chair (2003–2007), and a member and chair of the APA Board of Educational Affairs (2004–2006). She is editor in chief of the Journal of Vocational Behavior and is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Career Assessment, Journal of Career Development, and Training and Education in Professional Psychology. Dr. Fouad earned her BS in psychology from Iowa State University and her PhD in counseling psychology from the University of Minnesota.

Richard B. Freeman holds the Herbert Ascherman Chair in Economics at Harvard University and is faculty codirector of the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School as well as senior research fellow in labor markets at the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance. He also directs the Science Engi-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academy of Engineering. 2018. Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25284.
×

neering Workforce Project at the National Bureau of Economic Research and is codirector of the Harvard Center for Green Buildings and Cities. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and serves on its initiative for science and technology. He has served on 12 panels and boards of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM). He has received the Mincer Lifetime Achievement Prize (2006) from the Society of Labor Economics and the IZA (Institute of Labor Economics) Prize in Labor Economics (2007), and in 2011 he was appointed Frances Perkins Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. In 2016 he received the Global Equity Organization Judges Award, honoring exceptional contributions to the promotion of global employee share ownership, and in the same year he was named a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association. Professor Freeman’s research interests include the job market for scientists and engineers; the transformation of scientific ideas into innovations, Chinese and Korean labor markets; the effects of AI and robots on the job market; and forms of labor market representation and employee ownership. His recent publications include The Citizen’s Share: Putting Ownership Back into Democracy (2013) and US Engineering in a Global Economy (2018). Dr. Freeman has a PhD in economics from Harvard.

Jennifer Hunt is the James Cullen Chair in Economics and professor of economics at Rutgers University. In 2013–2015, while on leave from Rutgers, she served as the first chief economist of the US Department of Labor, then as deputy assistant secretary for microeconomic analysis at the US Department of the Treasury. Before joining Rutgers in 2011, she held positions at McGill University, the University of Montreal, and Yale University. Dr. Hunt is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London, and serves on the Scientific Advisory Council of the Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (Research Institute of the German Federal Employment Agency) in Nuremburg. Her current research focuses on immigration and wage inequality; past research has also encompassed unemployment, the science and engineering workforce, the transition from communism, crime and corruption. She received her bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her PhD in economics from Harvard.

Amy Javernick-Will is an associate professor and Nicholas R. and Nancy D. Petry Professor in Construction Engineering and Management in the University of Colorado Boulder’s Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering. Her research group seeks to improve lives through socially sustainable infrastructure in resource-limited communities. Dr. Javernick-Will conducts global research on disaster recovery and resiliency planning; global organizational and knowledge management; sustainable WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) systems; and engineering education, where she focuses on participation in service organizations and projects. She is also associate director for graduate education and research at the Mortenson Center for Engineering in Developing Communities. Before entering academia, she worked for over six years in the construction and real estate development industry as a design-build project manager. She is an associate editor of Construction Management and Economics. Her honors include the American Society of Civil Engineering (ASCE) Daniel W. Halpin Award for Scholarship in Construction (2018), the Distinguished Professor Award (2016) from the Construction Industry Institute, and the Engineering News-Record Mountain States “Top 20 under 40” Award. Dr. Javernick-Will is a member of ASCE, Engineers without Borders (EWB-USA), the Construction Research Council, and the Construction Industry Institute. She earned her BS and MS from the University of Colorado Boulder and PhD from Stanford University, all in civil engineering, with a focus on construction engineering and management for her advanced degrees.

Julia Lane is a professor at the Wagner School and Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP) and Provostial Fellow for Innovation Analytics and Senior Fellow in the GovLab at New York University. She was previously a senior managing economist and institute fellow at American Institutes for Research; director of the National Science Foundation’s Science of Science and Innovation Policy Program; a senior vice president of NORC at the University of Chicago; and a senior research fellow at the US Census Bureau. She has also held positions at the Urban Institute, World Bank, and American University. Dr. Lane is the founder or cofounder of the Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamic (LEHD) partnership with the Census Bureau, the Institute for Research on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academy of Engineering. 2018. Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25284.
×

Innovation and Science at the University of Michigan, and the NORC/University of Chicago Data Enclave. She was involved in the initiation of Patentsview for the US Patent and Trademark Office and the Integrated Data Initiative for Statistics New Zealand, and has been working with a number of national governments to document the results of their science investments. She has authored over 80 refereed articles, including publication in Science and Nature, and edited or authored ten books. She is a coeditor, with the late Jack Marburger, of the Handbook of Science Policy. Dr. Lane received her master’s in statistics and PhD in economics from the University of Missouri.

Gary S. May (NAE) is chancellor of the University of California, Davis, leading the most comprehensive campus in the UC system, with four colleges and six professional schools that offer 104 undergraduate majors and 96 graduate and professional degrees. He was previously dean of the College of Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Steve W. Chaddick Chair of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (2005–2011), and executive assistant to Georgia Tech president G. Wayne Clough (2002–2005). He founded Georgia Tech’s Summer Undergraduate Research in Engineering/Science (SURE) program for talented minority students, and is also the founder and director of Facilitating Academic Careers in Engineering and Science program (FACES) to encourage minority engagement in engineering and science careers. His research is in computer-aided manufacturing of integrated circuits, a field in which he has authored over 250 articles and technical presentations. Dr. May is a member of the National Advisory Board of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). He was editor in chief of IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing (1997–2001) and an NSF National Young Investigator (1993–1998). He received his bachelor’s in electrical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and MS and PhD in electrical engineering and computer science from UC Berkeley.

Richard K. Miller (NAE) was appointed president (and first employee) of Olin College of Engineering in 1999. The college, committed to rethinking what it means to be educated and what it means to be an engineer in the 21st century, operates as a privately funded “national lab” for engineering education redesign. Dr. Miller was previously on the engineering faculty and dean of engineering at the University of Iowa, associate dean of engineering at the University of Southern California, and on the faculty at the University of California, Santa Barbara. With a background in applied mechanics and current interests in innovation in higher education, he has authored more than 100 reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and other publications. In 2017 he received the Brock International Prize in Education for his many contributions to the reinvention of engineering education in the 21st century; in 2013, together with two Olin colleagues, he received the NAE’s Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education; and in 2011 he received the Marlowe Award for creative and distinguished administrative leadership from the American Society for Engineering Education. In addition to the NAE, he is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and National Academy of Inventors. Dr. Miller chairs the NASEM Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW) and has chaired the NSF Engineering Advisory Committee and served on advisory boards and committees for Harvard University, Stanford University, the NAE, NAS, and US Military Academy at West Point, among others. He has also served as a consultant to the World Bank in the establishment of new universities in developing countries. He received the 2002 Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award from UC Davis, where he earned his BS in aerospace engineering. He earned his MS in mechanical engineering from MIT and PhD in applied mechanics from the California Institute of Technology, from which he received the 2014 Caltech Distinguished Alumni Award.

David C. Nagel has over 35 years’ experience in the global energy industry, with executive positions in international business, corporate finance, and government relations. His career began with Amoco International and he joined BP after the merger with Amoco in 1999, retiring from BP in 2013. Some of his BP responsibilities included CEO roles for the company’s businesses in Egypt and Algeria, global head of mergers and acquisitions, group controller for exploration and production, and head of BP’s Washington office. Mr. Nagel’s activities now include advising nonprofit organizations at the board and executive level, and engaging in public discussions of energy issues. In 2012 he and three faculty from Duke Corporate Education coauthored The New CFOs (Kogan Page). He has served on advisory boards for the Division of International Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, the Woolly Mammoth Theatre

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academy of Engineering. 2018. Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25284.
×

Company in Washington, the National Capital Area Council of the Boy Scouts, and the nonpartisan organization OurEnergyPolicy.org. Mr. Nagel has a BS in chemistry and an MBA in international finance, both from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Sheri D. Sheppard is the Bass University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, the Richard Weiland Professor of Mechanical Engineering, associate chair for undergraduate curriculum in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and codirector of the Center for Design Research in the School of Engineering at Stanford University. In 2006–2007 she chaired the faculty senate, and in 2009–2014 she was associate vice provost of graduate education. For nearly 20 years she has served as faculty advisor to the Mechanical Engineering Women’s Group at Stanford, which holds an annual seminar series and a welcome program for all female engineers. Her research focuses on fracture mechanics and applied finite element analysis, and on how people become engineers. She led a three-year study, Educating Engineers: Designing for the Future of the Field (Jossey-Bass, 2009), and is an internationally recognized expert on engineering education. In 2010 she received the Walter J. Gores Award, Stanford’s highest award for excellence in teaching, and in 2014 she was named the CASE/CFAT US Professor of the Year (Doctoral and Research Universities). Dr. Sheppard received her BS in engineering mechanics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and her MS and PhD, both in mechanical engineering, from the University of Michigan.

Nicole Smith is a research professor and the chief economist in the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University; she leads the Center’s econometric and methodological work and has developed a framework for restructuring long-term occupational and educational projections. This framework forms the underlying methodology for Help Wanted, a report that projects education demand for occupations in the US economy through 2020. She is part of a team of economists working on a project to map, forecast, and monitor human capital development and career pathways. Before joining the Center, she was a faculty member in economics at Gettysburg College and the University of the West Indies (UWI), St. Augustine campus. She taught classical and modern econometrics, introductory and advanced courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics, statistics, mathematics for economists, and Latin American economic development. Her current research investigates the role of education and socioeconomic factors in intergenerational mobility. Her previous macroeconomic research focused on the political economy of exchange rates and exchange rate volatility in the Commonwealth Caribbean, the motivation for her MS thesis and a joint publication at the Inter-American Development Bank. Dr. Smith is a coauthor of “The Inheritance of Educational Inequality: International Comparisons and Fifty-Year Trends,” published in 2007 by the B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy. She was a corecipient of the 2007 Arrow Prize for Junior Economists for educational mobility research. She was born in Trinidad and Tobago and graduated with honors in economics and mathematics from UWI (St. Augustine campus), from which she received the Sir Arthur Lewis Memorial Prize for outstanding research at the master’s level. She earned her PhD in economics from American University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academy of Engineering. 2018. Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25284.
×
Page 202
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academy of Engineering. 2018. Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25284.
×
Page 203
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academy of Engineering. 2018. Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25284.
×
Page 204
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academy of Engineering. 2018. Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25284.
×
Page 205
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academy of Engineering. 2018. Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25284.
×
Page 206
Understanding the Educational and Career Pathways of Engineers Get This Book
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Engineering skills and knowledge are foundational to technological innovation and development that drive long-term economic growth and help solve societal challenges. Therefore, to ensure national competitiveness and quality of life it is important to understand and to continuously adapt and improve the educational and career pathways of engineers in the United States. To gather this understanding it is necessary to study the people with the engineering skills and knowledge as well as the evolving system of institutions, policies, markets, people, and other resources that together prepare, deploy, and replenish the nation’s engineering workforce.

This report explores the characteristics and career choices of engineering graduates, particularly those with a BS or MS degree, who constitute the vast majority of degreed engineers, as well as the characteristics of those with non-engineering degrees who are employed as engineers in the United States. It provides insight into their educational and career pathways and related decision making, the forces that influence their decisions, and the implications for major elements of engineering education-to-workforce pathways.

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