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Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being (2019)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
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Page 298
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
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Page 299
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
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Page 300
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
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Page 301
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
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Page 302
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
×
Page 303
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
×
Page 304
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
×
Page 305
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
×
Page 306
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
×
Page 307
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25521.
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Appendix A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE Pascale Carayon, Ph.D. (Co-Chair), is Leon and Elizabeth Janssen Professor in the College of Engineering, the Director of the Wisconsin Institute for Healthcare Systems Engineering (WIHSE), and she leads the Systems Engi- neering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) at the University of Wisconsin– Madison. Dr. Carayon has three decades of research experience analyzing, designing, and improving complex work systems such as those found in health care. In the past 20 years, her research has focused on patient safety and other health care quality issues such as design and implementation of health information technologies. As an industrial and systems engineer, she is renowned for her groundbreaking contributions in modeling complex system interactions in health care processes that can lead to medical errors and other adverse outcomes for patients and health care professionals. Dr. Carayon is the editor of the Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Health Care and Patient Safety. Dr. Carayon is a Fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Fellow of the International Ergonomics Association, member of the editorial boards of Behavior and Information Technology, Work & Stress and the Journal of Patient Safety. Dr. Carayon is currently Chair of the Board on Human-Systems Integration in the Di- vision of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Christine K. Cassel, M.D. (Co-Chair), is Senior Advisor on Strategy and Policy, Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. 297

298 TAKING ACTION AGAINST CLINICIAN BURNOUT Recently, Dr. Cassel served as Planning Dean of the new Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine. An internist and geriatrician, Dr. Cassel was President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the National Quality Forum, and served as President and CEO of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and the ABIM Foundation, and as the former President of the American College of Physicians. She served on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) under President Barack Obama and was the Co-Chair and Physician Leader of PCAST reports, working group on issues relating to health information technology; advances in technology for hearing, technology, and aging; and ensuring the safety of the nation’s drinking water A national leader in efforts to inspire quality care, she was a founding member of the Commonwealth Fund’s Commission on a High Performance Health System, and served on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees that wrote the influential reports To Err Is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm. In addition to having chaired IOM reports on end-of-life care and public health, she served on the IOM’s Comparative Effective Research (CER) Committee mandated by U.S. Congress to set priorities for the national CER effort. She is an active scholar and lecturer on geriatric medicine, aging, bioethics, and health policy. Elisabeth Belmont, Esq., serves as Corporate Counsel for MaineHealth, which is ranked among the nation’s top 100 integrated health care delivery networks and has combined annual revenues of nearly $2 billion. She is responsible for a myriad of complex issues faced by an integrated delivery system on a daily basis and has a specialty concentration in health information and technology. Ms. Belmont has participated in a number of national initiatives in which quality improvement, patient safety, and information technologies intersect including events sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), HHS Office of Inspector General, American Health Lawyers Association, American Society of Healthcare Risk Management, and American Association for the Advancement of Science. She serves as a member of the Division Committee of the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is a former member of the National Academies’ Board on Health Care Services of the Health and Medicine Division, and participated as a member of the National Academies’ consensus study Committee on Diagnostic Error in Health Care. Additionally, Ms. Belmont is a past President of the American Health Lawyers Association, former Chair of the Association’s Health Information & Technology Practice Group, and former Chair of the Association’s Quality in Action Task Force. She also was appointed Co-Chair of the National Quality Forum’s Health IT Patient

APPENDIX A 299 Safety Measures Standing Committee. Ms. Belmont previously served on the Advisory Boards of Bloomberg’s Health Law Reporter and Health Law & Business News. Ms. Belmont co-authored agency guidance, EHR Contracts Untangled: Selecting Wisely, Negotiating Terms and Understanding the Fine Print, for the HHS ONC. She is the recipient of numerous honors, including being named by Modern Healthcare as one of the 2007 Top 25 Most Powerful Women in Healthcare, being selected to receive the American Health Lawyers Association 2014 David J. Greenburg Service Award, and being named by the National Academies as a 2016 National Associate for outstanding contributions to the work of the National Academies. Neil A. Busis, M.D., FAAN, is Director of Community Neurology and D ­ irector of the General Teleneurology Program of the University of P ­ ittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Department of Neurology. He is Clinical Professor of Neurology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Chief of Neurology and Director of the Neurodiagnostic Laboratory at UPMC Shadyside. He serves on the UPMC Physician Wellness Committee. Prior to joining UPMC in 2012, Dr. Busis was in the private practice of neurology for 27 years. Dr. Busis has expertise in practice issues—especially coding, billing, reimbursement, and regulatory agency advocacy—and in health information technology, including electronic health records and the use of telemedicine, and Web-based resources and mobile devices to en- hance medical practice. Dr. Busis was Co-Chair of the American Academy of Neurology’s (AAN’s) Neurologist Wellness Task Force Study Group and principal investigator of its neurologist burnout study. He serves as Vice Chair of the AAN Health Policy Subcommittee and is a member of its Joint Coordinating Council on Wellness and Neurology Outcome Quality Measure Development Work Group. He is the AAN’s Alternate Advisor on the American Medical Association’s (AMA’s) CPT Advisory Committee. Dr. Busis is a member of the Steering Committee and co-leads the Action on Consensus Report Recommendations Working Group of the National Academy of Medicine’s (NAM’s) Action Collaborative on Clinician Well- Being and Resilience. He was formerly co-lead of the Messaging and Com- munications Working Group and a member of the Publications and Art Show Working Group of the NAM Action Collaborative. M. Lynn Crismon, Pharm.D., FCPP, BCPP, is Dean, James T. Doluisio ­ egents Chair and Behrens Centennial Professor, College of Pharmacy, and R Professor of Psychiatry, Dell Medical School, at The University of Texas at Austin. He is board certified in psychiatric pharmacy by the Board of Phar- macy Specialties, and he is a Diplomate of the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology. Prior to becoming Dean, he developed a nationally recog- nized training program in psychiatric pharmacotherapy and mental health

300 TAKING ACTION AGAINST CLINICIAN BURNOUT outcomes research and supervised post-Pharm.D., psychiatric pharmacy residents, research fellows, and graduate students. His research, scholar- ship, and practice have focused on the development and evaluation of strategies to improve the pharmacotherapy and health outcomes of adults and children with severe mental disorders. Dr. Crismon is a past Chair of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Council of Deans, past member of the AACP Board of Directors, a past member of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Board of Regents, ACCP Research Institute Board of Trustees, and a current member of the National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology and Education (NIPTE) Board of Directors. Liselotte Dyrbye, M.D., MHPE, is Professor of Medicine & Medical Educa- tion and Co-Director, Program on Physician Well-Being at the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Dyrbye is a general internist in Community Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Minnesota, and holds many key positions, including Department of Medicine Associate Chair for Faculty Development, Staff Satisfaction, and Diversity, Director of Faculty Development for the Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education, and Executive Director of the Mayo Clinic Academy of Educational Excellence. Her research addresses the prevalence, drivers, and consequences of burnout and mitigating strategies. She collabo- rates with numerous national organizations in an ongoing effort to translate the body of knowledge generated by herself and others into meaningful and substantive changes for the medical profession. Dr. Dyrbye is a member of the National Academy of Medicine’s Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience, the National Board of Medical Examiners Effort on Wellness Task Force, and the Physician Well-Being Task Force of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Pooja Kinkhabwala, D.O., is an Endocrinology Fellow at Larkin Commu- nity Hospital. She completed her Internal Medicine Residency as resident physician at the Hackensack Meridian Health Palisades Medical Center. In addition to her experience as a practicing physician in internal medicine, Dr. Kinkhabwala has been engaged in activities to address physician and resident wellness. She is a member of the American Osteopathic Association Task Force on Physician Wellness and is a co-author of the paper “Address- ing Burnout, Depression, and Suicidal Ideation in the Osteopathic Profes- sion: An Approach That Spans the Physician Life Cycle,” published by the National Academy of Medicine in 2017. Dr. Kinkhabwala is a past Presi- dent of the American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin–­ edical M ­Student/Resident/Fellow Section.

APPENDIX A 301 Wanda Lipscomb, Ph.D., is the Senior Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion and the Associate Dean for Student Affairs at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. Dr. Lipscomb is a tenured Associ- ate Professor of Psychiatry. Trained as a psychologist, Dr. Lipscomb has an active interest in the areas of medical student development and engagement, medical student health and wellness, mental health, improving diversity in the health professions workforce, and improving health care services. In her role as Associate Dean for Student Affairs, Dr. Lipscomb oversees health and wellness, career development, professional development, community engagement, records, enrollment, financial aid, and services for medical stu- dents. Dr. Lipscomb is the National Chair of the Group on Student Affairs of the Association of American Medical Colleges. The Group on Student Affairs coordinates constituency activities in medical student affairs includ- ing health and wellness, careers in medicine, admissions, financial advising, student records, and student diversity. Dr. Lipscomb also currently serves on the GSA National Committee on Student Affairs and is the President of the National Council on Diversity in the Health Professions. Saranya Loehrer, M.D., M.P.H., serves as the Head of Innovation at the Insti­ tute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). In this capacity, she leads a team of curious and creative researchers responsible for exploring seemingly intrac- table impediments to health and health care improvement and developing actionable theories and tools that can be tested in collaboration with part- ners worldwide. In addition, Dr. Loehrer supports selected efforts of the IHI Leader­ hip Alliance, a group of more than 40 leading U.S. health care execu- s tives working courageously and collaboratively to deliver on the full promise of the Triple Aim. Prior to joining IHI, Dr. Loehrer worked for Physicians for Human Rights, leading global and domestic grassroots advocacy efforts to create more just and scientifically sound HIV/AIDS policies. She received her M.D. from the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, where she was an Albert Schweitzer Fellow, and her M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health, where she was a Zuckerman Fellow. M. A. J. Lex MacNeil, D.D.S., retired (June 2019) as Professor and Founding Dean, College of Dental Medicine–Illinois (CDMI) at Midwestern University. Prior to his appointment at CDMI in 2009, Dr. MacNeil was a full-time general dental practitioner and then spent 15 years as the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs and tenured Associate Professor in the Department of Oral Health Sciences at the University of British Columbia. Dr. MacNeil has extensive expertise in organizational planning and clinical operations for dental education programs, including the development and implementation of a hybrid Problem-Based Learning (PBL) curriculum and the development of person-centered care and group practice models to

302 TAKING ACTION AGAINST CLINICIAN BURNOUT support clinical education. Dr. MacNeil is a graduate of the Midwestern University Costin Institute for Medical Educators, a program for medical personnel involved in teaching and academic management. Additionally, he is a past President of the Association of Canadian Faculties of Dentistry (ACFD), the national association for dental education in Canada. For more than 20 years, Dr. MacNeil has worked collaboratively with private-sector software corporations on the development of electronic health records and patient management software systems, and is currently focused on improving design and interoperability aimed at enhancing health care and learning in dental education, dental practice and interprofessional settings. As well, Dr. MacNeil continues to serve as a consultant in the wider realm of pre-doctoral dental education, particularly in the clinical domain. José A. Pagán, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Public Health Policy and Management in the College of Global Public Health at New York University. He is also Adjunct Senior Fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania and Chair of the Board of Directors of New York City Health + Hospitals. Dr. Pagán is a health economist who has led research, implementation, and evaluation projects on the redesign of delivery and payment systems. His research interests include population health science, health care payment and delivery system reform, and the social determinants of health. He was a member of the Committee on Accessible and Affordable Hearing Health Care for Adults at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Pagán was Director of the Center for Health Innovation at The New York Academy of Medicine and Professor in the Department of Population Health Science and Policy at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Interdisci- plinary Association for Population Health Science and the American Society of Health Economists. He also chaired the National Advisory Committee of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Health Policy Research Scholars. Sharon H. Pappas, R.N., Ph.D., NEA-BC, FAAN, is the Chief Nurse Executive for Emory Healthcare. She is a member of Emory Healthcare and the Woodruff Health Science Center’s senior leadership teams and is responsible for nursing practice across Emory’s hospitals, ambulatory care, and post-acute agencies. Dr. Pappas served on the Colorado Board of Nursing and served on the Governor’s Task Force for Nurse Staffing. Throughout her career, Dr. Pappas has focused on the role nurses and the nursing environment play in patient safety and hospital costs. She serves as professor for the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. Dr. Pappas is a member of the American Nurses Association, the Council on Graduate Education for Administration in Nursing, and the American

APPENDIX A 303 Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), for which she served as a Board member and currently represents AONE on the Commission on Magnet® for the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Dr. Pappas is a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing, for which she co-chairs the Expert Panel on Building Health Care System Excellence. Cynda Hylton Rushton, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, is the Anne and George L. Bunting Professor of Clinical Ethics in the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and the School of Nursing, with a joint appointment in the School of Medicine’s Department of Pediatrics. A founding member of the Berman Institute of Bioethics, Dr. Rushton co-chairs the Johns Hopkins Hospital’s Ethics Committee and Consultation Service. An international leader in nursing ethics, Dr. Rushton in 2014 co-led the first National Nurs- ing Ethics Summit, convened by the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and School of Nursing. In 2016 she co-led a national symposium focusing on transforming moral distress by cultivating moral resilience and ethical practice. Her current scholarship in clinical ethics focuses on moral suffering of clinicians, the development of moral resilience, palliative care, and designing a culture of ethical practice in health care. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and the Hastings Center. She has served on the Institute of Medicine’s committee on increasing rates of organ dona- tion and was a consultant to its project When Children Die. She also was appointed the first Chair of the Maryland State Council on Quality Care at the End-of-Life. She is editor and author of the recently released book Moral Resilience: Transforming Moral Suffering in Healthcare. Tait Shanafelt, M.D., is the Jeanie and Stew Ritchie Professor of Medicine, Associate Dean and Chief Wellness Officer at Stanford Medicine. A hematologist–oncologist by training, Dr. Shanafelt is a leading researcher on clinician burnout and its impact on quality of care, access to care, and the health care workforce. Prior to his position at Stanford, Dr. Shanafelt was a Professor of Medicine and Hematology at the Mayo Clinic and served a 3-year term as President of the Mayo Clinic voting staff from 2013 to 2016. He was the founding Director of the Mayo Clinic Department of Medicine Program on Physician Well-Being and led a number of initiatives at Mayo to mitigate burnout and improve physicians’ sense of fulfillment and well-being. He has published more than 325 peer-reviewed manuscripts and research studies, including more than 125 on the topic of health care professional well-being. His research in this area has involved physicians at all stages of their career, from medical school to practice, and has included many multi-center and national studies. In 2018, he was named by Time Magazine as one of the 50 most influential people in health care.

304 TAKING ACTION AGAINST CLINICIAN BURNOUT George Thibault, M.D., is former President for the Josiah Macy Jr. Foun- dation and the Daniel D. Federman Professor of Medicine and Medical E ­ ducation Emeritus at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Prior to that posi- tion, he served as Vice President of clinical affairs at Partners Healthcare System in Boston and Director of the Academy at HMS. Dr. Thibault previ- ously served as Chief Medical Officer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and as Chief of Medicine at the Harvard-affiliated Brockton/West Roxbury V ­ eterans Affairs Hospital. He was Associate Chief of Medicine and Director of the Internal Medical Residency Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), where he also served as director of the medical intensive care unit and the founding director of the Medical Practice Evaluation Unit. For nearly four decades at HMS, Dr. Thibault played leadership roles in many aspects of undergraduate and graduate medical education. He has been Chairman of the Board of the MGH Institute of Health Professions and The New York Academy of Medicine. He currently serves on the boards of The New York Academy of Medicine and the Arnold P. Gold Founda- tion. In 2017 he was the recipient of the Abraham Flexner Award for Dis- tinguished Service to Medical Education from the Association of American Medical Colleges, and he is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. Vindell Washington, M.D., is Chief Medical Officer at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana, where he leads statewide efforts to focus the health care system on delivering patient-centered, high-value care for its members. Dr. Washington, who has extensive experience in leading clinical teams and in health information technology (IT), most recently served as the national coordinator for health care information technology in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In that role he led the nation’s efforts to promote the use of health IT, data interoperability, and delivery system reform. Prior to that, Dr. Washington was at the Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady Health System in Baton Rouge for more than 7 years serving in senior clinical and administrative roles, including Medical Group President and Chief Medical Information Officer. A board-certified emergency medicine physician, Dr. Washington is the former Chief Executive Officer of Piedmont Emergency Medicine Associates, a large private medical group in Charlotte, North Carolina. Matthew B. Weinger, M.D., is a Fellow of the Human Factors and ­ rgonomics Society, holds the Norman Ty Smith Chair in Patient Safety E and Medical Simulation, and is a Professor of anesthesiology, biomedical informatics, and medical education at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He is the Director of Center for Research and Innovation in ­ ystems Safety at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and is a Professor S of civil and environmental engineering in the Vanderbilt University School

APPENDIX A 305 of Engineering. Dr. Weinger has been teaching and conducting research in human factors in health care, patient safety, and clinical decision making for three decades. He has done research on burnout, distraction, fatigue, and the effects of information technology on clinician performance. He served as Vice Chair for research on the Board of Directors of the Asso- ciation for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) and as the Co-Chair of its Human Factors Engineering standards committee for 13 years. He continues to be a member of that committee as well as on the AAMI committee developing national standards for health informa- tion technology. He is currently a member of a committee of the American Board of Anesthesiology developing a new simulation-based assessment exam for primary certification of anesthesiologists. He is a member of the Board on Human-Systems Integration in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engi­ neering, and Medicine. STAFF Laura Aiuppa Denning, M.S., is a Senior Program Officer at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Since 2010, Ms. Aiuppa has directed various National Academies policy research studies and pro- gram evaluations in support of high-quality health care in the United States. She recently served as rapporteur for Long-Term Survivorship Care After Cancer Treatment: Proceedings of a Workshop (2018). Other past studies led by Ms. Aiuppa address mental health care for military service members, veterans, and families, including Evaluation of the Department of Veteran Affairs Mental Health Services (2018), Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and Their Families: An Assessment of Programs (2014), and Returning Home from Iraq and Afghanistan: Readjustment Needs of Veterans, Service Members, and Their Families (2013). Prior to her employ- ment at the National Academies, Ms. Aiuppa was a Program Director at the National Committee for Quality Assurance, where she led health care quality measurement and reporting projects. Ms. Aiuppa began her career working as a research associate at a health care consulting firm serving fed- eral clients. Ms. Aiuppa received a bachelor’s degree in health and society from the University of Rochester and earned a master’s of science degree in health policy and program evaluation from Cornell University. Marc Meisnere, M.S.P.H., is an Associate Program Officer on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Health Care Services. Since 2010, Mr. Meisnere has worked on a variety of National Academies’ consensus studies and other activities that focused on mental health services for service members and veterans, suicide prevention, primary

306 TAKING ACTION AGAINST CLINICIAN BURNOUT care, and clinician well-being. Before joining the National Academies, Mr. Meisnere worked on a family planning media project in northern Nigeria with the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs and on a variety of international health policy issues at the Population Reference Bureau. He is a graduate of Colorado College and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Heather Kreidler, M.S., was Associate Program Officer for the National Academies’ Board on Environmental Change and Society and the Board on Human-Systems Integration until 2019. She joined the National Academies in 2008 and worked on wide-ranging topics including public health, nutrition, dietary guidance, and issues facing children, youth, and families. Her projects examined and advanced the social and behavioral sciences at the intersection of human activity and global environmental change and issues concerning the relationship of individuals and organizations to technology and the environment. Ms. Kreidler received a B.S. in business management from Kutztown University in Pennsylvania and an M.S. in environmental science and policy from George Mason University. Rajbir Kaur was Senior Program Assistant in the Health and Medicine Divi- sion of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She supported various convening activities at the National Academies, includ- ing the Roundtable on Quality Care for People with Serious Illness and the Forum on Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders. Prior to joining the National Academies, she was a Clinical Quality Coordinator at Erickson Living and an intern for the Office of Minority Health at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Ms. Rajbir graduated from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, with a degree in health administration and public policy. Sharyl J. Nass, Ph.D., serves as Director of the Board on Health Care Services and Director of the National Cancer Policy Forum at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The National Academies provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions related to science, technology, and medicine. To enable the best possible care for all patients, the board undertakes scholarly analysis of the organization, financing, effectiveness, workforce, and delivery of health care, with emphasis on quality, cost, and accessibility. The forum examines policy issues pertaining to the entire continuum of cancer research and care. For two decades, Dr. Nass has worked on a broad range of health and science policy topics that includes the quality and safety of health care and clinical trials, developing technologies for precision medicine, and strategies for

APPENDIX A 307 large-scale biomedical science. She has a Ph.D. from Georgetown University and undertook postdoctoral training at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as well as a research fellowship at the Max Planck Institute in Germany. She also holds a B.S. and an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She has been the recipient of the Cecil Medal for Excellence in Health Policy Research, a Distinguished Service Award from the National Academies, and the Institute of Medicine staff team achievement award (as team leader). Toby Warden, Ph.D., is the director for the Board on Human-Systems Integration (BOHSI) and the Board on Environmental Change and Society at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Warden is returning to the National Academies after a 2-year period as the director of Scientific Administration for the Department of Neurological Sciences and as an assistant Professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, spearheading strategic planning efforts to foster research collaboration. Previously at the National Academies, she began in 2009 as a Study Director on climate change and weather-related activities with the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. She joined BOHSI in 2011 as a Study Director, and later Associate Board Director, working on a number of activities related to worker safety, safety culture, systems design, and organizational performance. She holds a Ph.D. in social ecology with an emphasis on environmental analysis and design from the University of California, Irvine. A member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, she also holds a certificate in Business Fundamentals from HBX/ Harvard Business School.

Next: Appendix B: Medicare Program, The Joint Commission, and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Documentation and Coding Requirements »
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Patient-centered, high-quality health care relies on the well-being, health, and safety of health care clinicians. However, alarmingly high rates of clinician burnout in the United States are detrimental to the quality of care being provided, harmful to individuals in the workforce, and costly. It is important to take a systemic approach to address burnout that focuses on the structure, organization, and culture of health care.

Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being builds upon two groundbreaking reports from the past twenty years, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System and Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, which both called attention to the issues around patient safety and quality of care. This report explores the extent, consequences, and contributing factors of clinician burnout and provides a framework for a systems approach to clinician burnout and professional well-being, a research agenda to advance clinician well-being, and recommendations for the field.

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