National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: References
Page 78
Suggested Citation:"Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Measuring, Characterizing, and Reporting Pavement Roughness of Low-Speed and Urban Roads. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25563.
×
Page 78
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Measuring, Characterizing, and Reporting Pavement Roughness of Low-Speed and Urban Roads. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25563.
×
Page 79

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

78 A/D Analog-to-Digital AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials AC Asphalt Concrete CAN Controller Area Network CORS Continuously Operating Reference Stations CPU Central Processing Unit DAS Data Acquisition System DOT Department of Transportation DUA Data Use Agreement FHWA Federal Highway Administration GCARS Golden Car Average Rectified Slope GCARV Golden Car Average Rectified Velocity GCRMSA Golden Car Root Mean Square Acceleration GCRMSS Golden Car Root Mean Square Slope GCRMSV Golden Car Root Mean Square Velocity GPS Global Positioning System HPMS Highway Performance Monitoring System IMU Inertial Measurement Unit INS Inertial Navigation System IRI International Roughness Index ISO International Organization for Standardization LTPP Long-Term Pavement Performance MEMS Microelectromechanical MRI Mean Roughness Index MTV Maximum Transient Vibration NDA Non-Disclosure Agreement NHPP National Highway Performance Program NHS National Highway System NTRIP Network Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol OVT Overall Vibration Total PCC Portland Cement Concrete PTRN Pre-transform Ride Number PVT Point Vibration Total RARV Reference Average Rectified Velocity RMQ Root Mean Quad RMS Root Mean Squared RN Ride Number Acronyms

79 RTCM Radio Technical Commission for Maritime RTK Real Time Kinematic SAE Society of Automotive Engineers SPS Specific Pavement Studies SUV Sport Utility Vehicle UMTRI University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute

Next: Attachment 1 - Proposed Changes to AASHTO Specifications »
Measuring, Characterizing, and Reporting Pavement Roughness of Low-Speed and Urban Roads Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Pavement smoothness (or roughness) is used by state highway agencies for monitoring network condition and other purposes such as assessing construction quality and optimizing investments in preservation, rehabilitation, and reconstruction.

States are also required to report the International Roughness Index (IRI) as an element of the federal Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS). Because IRI is not measured directly but is calculated as the mechanical response of a generic quarter-car, traveling at 50 mph, to the elevation profile of the roadway, there are concerns about using current practices for estimating roughness of low-speed and urban roads

Because of the unique features of low-speed and urban roads, research was needed to identify or, if necessary, develop means for appropriately measuring, characterizing and reporting pavement roughness of these roads.

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Research Report 914: Measuring, Characterizing, and Reporting Pavement Roughness of Low-Speed and Urban Roads reviews the practices for roughness measurement and the unique features of urban and low-speed roadways, and it evaluates the use of existing inertial profilers for such measurements.

The report also proposes revisions to American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials standard specifications and practices addressing inertial profiler certification and operations.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!