National Academies Press: OpenBook

Economic and Social Sustainability at Airports (2019)

Chapter: Setting the Social Stage

« Previous: Introduction
Page 3
Suggested Citation:"Setting the Social Stage." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Economic and Social Sustainability at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25597.
×
Page 3
Page 4
Suggested Citation:"Setting the Social Stage." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Economic and Social Sustainability at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25597.
×
Page 4

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

3 Setting the Social Stage Steve Nakana, Port of Portland, Oregon, presenter Panelists Gregory Jones, United Airlines Marion Town, Vancouver Airport Authority Angie Fyfe, International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives Steve Nakana opened the event with a presentation that identified the timeline for the port's social equity program, which began in 2013. By 2015, the program approach was identified, and by 2016, it was integrated into the port's activities. In 2017, the port formed its Administrative and Equity Division with a social equity program policy. The port’s policy defines social equity as “fair and equitable inclusion, and creating the conditions in which all people can participate, prosper, and achieve equitable outcomes with respect to the Port’s employment, business, and services.” This policy intentionally uses a racial equity lens. In 2018, implicit bias trainings were being conducted, and equity plans and metrics were being defined. Nakana provided a demonstration of equity (fairness) versus equality (sameness). He provided a chart showing the port's approach, including jobs, wellness, business ethics, security, diversity, community outreach, and labor relations. He noted that the program is based on a foundation that drives strategy, vision, leadership, and structure. This program has internal and external components. Nakana introduced the panel. Each panel member made a short statement before accepting questions. Gregory Jones reported that United Airlines has a subsection of its social equity program that is designed to ensure social equity competency in leadership. He reminded the audience that the social program needs to be clear about the problem that it is designed to solve. Marion Town noted that Vancouver International Airport (YVR) was one of the first programs that addressed sustainability from a four-legged stool perspective, incorporating environmental, economic, and social aspects, as well as governance. She noted that YVR benchmarks its performance each year. Angie Fyfe noted that the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI), an international organization of local governments committed to sustainable development, developed a sustainability tracking, assessment, and a rating system( STAR) that includes health and social considerations. Carol Lurie, of VHB, asked the panel to identify its innovative programs. Town noted that YVR was addressing the “silver tsunami,” a metaphor used to describe the aging population, through programs to move people through the airport with greater ease and less stress. Nakana noted that Portland was looking at creating space that addressed inclusiveness and how people used space, such as bathrooms. Jones noted that United was looking at the social programs of its supply chain and had formed a diversity council.

4 An individual in the audience asked about what was driving the parties to address social programs. Fyfe noted that ICLEI had embraced the principles of environmental justice and was asking if the right people were being asked the right questions— all of which was a means to ensure meaningful involvement and the capacity to build community voice and power. A person in the audience asked about how to engage effectively with the community and stakeholders. Town noted that it was important to share real data and to use technology to aid in communication. Nakana noted that in outreach, it was important to ask what issue was being solved and particularly to consider the capacity of the stakeholders to participate (i.e., working hours and language), as well as to consider funding the external parties’ participation (to compensate for the value that they bring as community consultants). The panel was asked about strategic partnerships and outreach by an audience member. Fyfe noted that ICLEI used community focus group meetings. Town noted that YVR has an agreement with First Nations that incudes revenue sharing for use of First Nations lands. Jones noted that United relies heavily on partnerships, such as its accessibility committee, which is comprised of external parties that advise the company.

Next: Setting the Economic Stage »
Economic and Social Sustainability at Airports Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Conference Proceedings on the Web 23: Economic and Social Sustainability at Airports is a compilation of the presentations and a summary of the ensuing discussions at May 7-8, 2018, forum in Washington, D.C.

The meeting brought together individuals from airports, airlines, academia, consulting, local and regional government, general sustainability professionals, and others. The forum included sessions on social sustainability, economic sustainability, keynotes on mitigating human trafficking and innovative development at airports, and interactive breakout discussions delving into myriad social and economic sustainability topics.

ACRP organized the event as part of its series of convening activities titled “ACRP Insight Events.” ACRP Insight Events are forums that foster dialogue among professionals across sectors, institutions, and industries.

ACRP Insight Events convene airport industry leaders and subject matter experts in various fields to encourage discussion and promote broader and deeper insight on topics of significance to airport operators. These in-depth, face-to-face gatherings are designed to promote communication and collaboration, foster innovation, and help identify areas of future interest and research, especially for topics of emerging importance.

Copies of the slides of presentations made at the form are available online. The literature review prepared for the event is also available online.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!