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Page 63
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Advancements in Use of Geophysical Methods for Transportation Projects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25809.
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Page 63
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Advancements in Use of Geophysical Methods for Transportation Projects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25809.
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Page 64

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63 Anderson, N., N. Croxton, R. Hoover, and P. Sirles, Transportation Research Circular No. E-C130: Geophysical Methods Commonly Employed for Geotechnical Site Characterization. Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2008. Boeckmann, A. Z., and J. E. Loehr. NCHRP Synthesis 484: Influence of Geotechnical Investigation and Subsurface Conditions on Claims, Change Orders, and Overruns. Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C., 2016. Bumpus, P. B., and S. E. Kruse. Self-Potential Monitoring for Hydrologic Investigations in Urban Covered Karst Terrain. Geophysics, Vol. 79, No. 6, 2014. California Department of Transportation. Geotechnical Manual [online]. California Department of Trans- portation, Sacramento, 2019. http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/esc/geotech/geo_manual/manual.html. Accessed May 14, 2019. Coe, J. T., S. J. Brandenberg, S. Ahdi, and A. Kordaji. Geophysical Methods for Determining the Geotechnical Engineering Properties of Earth Materials. Report CA-17-2111. California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, 2018. Colorado Department of Transportation. Geophysical Investigations for Subsurface Characterization. Internal document. Denver, 2006. Deschenes, M. R., C. Wood, L. Wotherspoon, B. Bradley, and E. Thompson. Development of Deep Shear Wave Velocity Profiles in the Canterbury Plains, New Zealand. Earthquake Spectra, Vol. 34, No. 3, 2018, pp. 1065–1089. Estrada-Medina, H., W. Tuttle, R. C. Graham, M. F. Allen, and J. Jimenez-Osornio. Identification of Under- ground Karst Features Using Ground-Penetrating Radar in Northern Yucatan. Vadose Zone, Vol. 9, No. 3, 2010, pp. 653–661. Foti, S., C. G. Lai, G. J. Rix, and C. Strobbia. Surface Wave Methods for Near-Surface Site Characterization, CRC Press, 2017. Gazoty, A., G. Fiandaca, J. Pedersen, E. Auken, and A. V. Christiansen. Mapping of Landfills Using Time-Domain Spectral Induced Polarization Data: The Eskelund Case Study. Near Surface Geophysics, Vol. 10, No. 6, 2012. Hickin, A. S., and M. E. Best. Mapping the Geometry and Lithostratigraphy of a Paleovalley with a Time-Domain Electromagnetic Technique in an Area with Small Resistivity Contrasts, Groundbirch, British Columbia, Canada. Journal of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, Vol. 18, No. 2, 2013, pp. 119–135. Krawczyk, C. M., U. Polom, and T. Beilecke. Shear-Wave Reflection Seismics as a Valuable Tool for Near- Surface Urban Applications. The Leading Edge—Special Section: Urban Geophysics, Vol. 32, No. 3, March 2013, pp. 256–263. Liu, S., and M. Sato. Subsurface Water-Filled Fracture Detection by Borehole Radar: A Case History. Journal of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, Vol. 11, No. 2, 2006, pp. 95–101. Maine Department of Transportation. Bridge Design Guide [online]. Maine Department of Transportation, Augusta, 2003. http://maine.gov/mdot/bdg/. Accessed July 5, 2016. Maryland Department of Transportation. Pavement and Geotechnical Design Guide [online]. Maryland Department of Transportation, Hanover, 2018. https://www.roads.maryland.gov/OMT/pdguide0718.pdf. Accessed August 13, 2019. Milsom, J., and A. Eriksen. Field Geophysics, 4th ed. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New Delhi, 2011. Nguyen, T. D., K. T. Tran, and M. McVay. Evaluation of Unknown Foundations Using Surface-Based Full Waveform Tomography. Journal of Bridge Engineering, Vol. 21, No. 5, 2016. Paine, J. G., S. M. Buckley, E. W. Collins, and C. R. Wilson. Assessing Collapse Risk in Evaporite Sinkhole-Prone Areas Using Microgravity and Radar Interferometry. Journal of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, Vol. 17, No. 2, 2012, pp. 75–87. References

64 Advancements in Use of Geophysical Methods for Transportation Projects Pazzi V., L. Tanteri, G. Bicocchi, A. Caselli, M. D’Ambrosio, and R. Fanti. H/V Technique for the Rapid Detection of Landslide Slip Surface(s): Assessment of the Optimized Measurements Spatial Distribution. In Advancing Culture of Living with Landslides (M. Mikos, B. Tiwari, Y. Yin, and K. Sassa, eds.), Springer, 2017. Reynolds, J. M. An Introduction to Applied and Environmental Geophysics, 2nd Ed. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New Delhi, 2011. Richter, J. L. Proceedings from SAGEEP 2010: Resistivity Imaging at Mn/DOT: “Building Bridges” in Duluth. Keystone, CO, 2010. Schmutz, M., A. Ghorbani, P. Vaudelet, and A. Revil. Spectral Induced Polarization Detects Cracks and Dis- tinguishes between Open and Clay-Filled Fractures. Journal of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2011, pp. 85–91. Sirles, P. C. NCHRP Synthesis 357: Use of Geophysics for Transportation Projects. TRB, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2006. South Carolina Department of Transportation. Geotechnical Design Manual, Ver. 2.0 [online]. South Carolina Department of Transportation, Columbia, 2019. http://www.scdot.org/doing/structural_geotechnical.aspx. Accessed March 7, 2010. Sullivan, B., K. T. Tran, and B. Logston. Characterization of Abandoned Mine Voids under Roadways with Land-Streamer Seismic Waves. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2580, 2016, pp. 71–79. DOI: 10.3141/2580-09. Tran K. T., M. Mirzanejad, M. McVay, and D. Horhota. 3D Time-Domain Gauss–Newton Full Waveform Inversion for Near-Surface Site Characterization. Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 217, 2019, pp. 206–218. Tucker, S. E., J.-L. Briaud, S. Hurlesbaus, and M. Everett. Electrical Resistivity and Induced Polarization Imaging for Unknown Foundation Bridge Foundations. Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, Vol. 141, No. 5, 2015. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Geotechnical Investigations. EM 1110-1-1804. Washington, D.C., 2001. Virginia Department of Transportation. Manual of Instructions for the Materials Division [online]. Virginia Department of Transportation, Richmond, 2019. http://www.virginiadot.org/business/materials-download- docs.asp. Accessed May 14, 2019. Wightman, W. E., F. Jalinoos, P. Sirles, and K. Hanna. Application of Geophysical Methods to Highway Related Problems. Publication No. FHWA-IF-04-021. FHWA, U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C., 2004. Wyoming Department of Transportation. Geology Manual. Internal document. Zheng, Y., A. H. Malallah, M. C. Fehler, and H. Hu. 2D Full-Waveform Inversion of Seismic Waves in Layered Karstic Media. Geophysics, Vol. 81, No. 2, 2016.

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Geophysical methods provide a means to rapidly and economically characterize subsurface conditions and infer soil properties over a spatial extent that is not possible with conventional methods.

The TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program's NCHRP Synthesis 547: Advancements in Use of Geophysical Methods for Transportation Projects evaluates the current state of practice in the use of geophysical methods by state transportation agencies.

Challenges and obstacles remain that must be overcome if routine implementation of geophysical methods for transportation projects is to be realized. Uncertainties associated with insufficient or poor site characterization can lead to overly conservative designs, increased risk of poor performance, cost increases attributable to changed conditions, and project delays.

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