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Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities (1997)

Chapter: Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
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Appendix

Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information

Vernon L. Snoeyink, who chaired the Committee on Small Water Supply Systems, was appointed to the civil engineering faculty at the University of Illinois in 1969. He is coordinator of the Environment and Science Program within civil engineering and was named Ivan Racheff Professor of Environmental Engineering in 1989. His primary area of research is drinking water quality improvement, and he has focused his efforts primarily on the removal of organic contaminants by activated carbon adsorption. In 1980, he coauthored the textbook Water Chemistry, published by John Wiley & Sons. He has been a trustee of the American Water Works Association Research Foundation and president of the Association of Environmental Engineering Professors; he now is a member of the editorial advisory board of the Journal of the American Water Works Association and vice-chair of the Drinking Water Committee of the Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board. He has been a member of several National Research Council committees, and he consults regularly for private industry and public agencies throughout the United States and Canada. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering and his Ph.D. in water resources engineering from the University of Michigan.

Gunther F. Craun is president of Craun and Associates. He has had nearly a 30-year career in drinking water regulation and research. From 1965 until 1991, he was a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service. From 1971 until 1991, he was assigned to the Environmental Protection Agency's drinking water program and research and development office. He held positions as chief of the epidemiology branch and coordinator of environmental epidemiology for the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×

Health Effects Research Laboratory and assistant to the director of the Drinking Water Research Division in Cincinnati, Ohio. He has authored or coauthored several books in the drinking water field, including Waterborne Diseases in the United States, published by CRC Press, and Methods for the Investigation and Prevention of Waterborne Disease Outbreaks, published by the Environmental Protection Agency. He holds a B.S. in civil engineering and an M.S. in sanitary engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and an M.P.H. and S.M. in epidemiology from Harvard University.

Stephen E. Himmell is vice president of engineering and Kankakee district manager for Consumers Illinois Water Company, the Illinois branch of Consumers Water Company that manages a larger number of water supply systems around the United States. In this position, he oversees management, operation, and budgeting of water and wastewater systems of the 18,000 customers of Kankakee district in Illinois and the engineering for the company's systems serving 60,000 customers in seven locations in Illinois. He has worked in the planning, design, management, and operations of water and wastewater systems for the past 22 years, the past 11 at Consumers. He recently was a member of a team that received the Build America Award of Merit from the Associated General Contractors for a redesign of a water system that saved the community $3 million. He holds M.S. and B.S. degrees in civil and sanitary engineering from the University of Missouri, Rolla, and is a certified professional engineer and Class A water works operator in the state of Illinois.

Carol R. James is the founder and principal of C. R. James and Associates, Consulting Engineers. She has more than 16 years of experience in conducting water quality and treatability studies and in water treatment plant pre-design. She has performed extensive alternative water treatment pilot-scale studies, water quality evaluations, regulatory compliance studies, and laboratory evaluations. She also has expertise in source water protection, having conducted watershed management projects and watershed sanitary surveys. She received a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Virginia and an M.S. in environmental engineering from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is registered as a civil engineer in the state of California.

Dennis D. Juranek is chief of the parasitology section for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), where he has worked since 1970. His recent work has included conducting epidemiologic investigations of waterborne outbreaks of Giardia and Cryptosporidium around the country; he was involved in the CDC's investigation of the recent Cryptosporidium outbreak in Milwaukee. He has published widely on outbreaks of various parasitic diseases and methods for investigating outbreaks. In addition to his work at CDC, Dr. Juranek serves as a faculty member in the Division of Public Health at Emory University. He received

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×

a B.S. in biology from Colorado State University, a D.V.M. from Colorado State's College of Veterinary Medicine, and an M.Sc. in medical parasitology from the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

Gary S. Logsdon is director of water treatment research for Black & Veatch. Previously, he served for more than 25 years with the U.S. Public Health Service and the Environmental Protection Agency. In his current position, he directs design of pilot drinking water treatment plant testing programs and works with water utilities to optimize their operations. He has a wide range of experience in water treatment technology development; he has conducted research on water filtration for removal of Giardia cysts, bacteria, and turbidity and on the modification of water quality for corrosion control. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil and sanitary engineering from the University of Missouri at Columbia and a D.Sc. from Washington University.

Frederick A. Marrocco is chief of the Drinking Water Management Division for the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources. In this position, he is responsible for developing and administering Pennsylvania's safe drinking water program, including its special assistance program for small communities. Marrocco was formerly a member of the National Drinking Water Advisory Council and president of the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators. He holds an M.S. degree in environmental engineering from the University of North Carolina and a B.S. degree in civil engineering from Drexel University.

John M. Maxwell is vice president of Economic and Engineering Services, where he specializes in financial management and planning for small utility systems. Previously, he worked as a state regulatory engineer, assisting utilities with system improvements, operation and maintenance, and operator certification. He is a national instructor for the American Water Works Association in the areas of cost of water supply service and rate studies. He holds M.S. degrees in sanitary engineering and environmental science from Washington State University.

Daniel A. Okun, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine, is a professor emeritus of environmental engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He chaired the University of North Carolina's Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering from 1955 until 1973. In addition to his academic responsibilities, he has advised cities, states, and governments worldwide on issues of water management and has served as a consultant for the World Bank, the Agency for International Development, and the World Health Organization. Dr. Okun chaired the Water Science and Technology Board from 1991 until 1994. He received his Sc.D. in sanitary

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×

engineering from Harvard University. He authored Regionalization of Water Management: A Revolution in England and Wales, published in London in 1977.

David R. Siburg is manager of the Kitsap Public Utility District, a countywide water supplier in Washington. The Kitsap district owns and operates 20 systems serving populations of from 10 to 5,000 people and provides contract service to more than 150 systems owned by others. Siburg received a B.A. in economics from Pacific Lutheran University and an M.A. in planning and public affairs from the University of Minnesota.

Velma M. Smith is director of domestic policy and director of the Groundwater Protection Project at Friends of the Earth. Previously, she served as legislative assistant on environmental and energy issues for Congressman Rick Boucher (D-VA), and prior to that she worked on farmland protection, land use, and water quality issues for the Piedmont Environmental Council in Warrenton, Virginia. While working for Congressman Boucher, Smith worked with small communities in western Virginia to help secure new potable drinking water supplies. She was involved in the 1986 reauthorization of the Safe Drinking Water Act for Friends of the Earth and has followed the implementation of the law since that time. Smith has frequently worked with the Rural Community Action Project to develop a better understanding among environmentalists of the water needs of small, low-income communities. In testimony before Congress, she has advocated regionalization of small drinking water systems. Smith served for 6 years as a member of the Virginia State Water Control Board, including one year as chair. She also served on the National Drinking Water Advisory Council. She holds a master's degree in environmental planning from the University of Virginia.

Amy K. Zander is an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Clarkson University. Her research focuses on membrane technologies for removing contaminants from drinking water. Previously, she served as a water quality specialist for the Texas Water Commission. She received a B.S. in biology and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota and is a registered professional engineer in the state of Minnesota.

Staff

Jacqueline A. MacDonald is a senior staff officer at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She served as study director for the Committee on Small Water Supply Systems. Previously, she directed studies on alternatives for ground water cleanup and bioremediation of contaminated ground water and soil. She holds an M.S. in environmental science in civil

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×

engineering from the University of Illinois and a B.A., magna cum laude, in mathematics from Bryn Mawr College.

Etan Z. Gumerman is a research associate at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. He performed a variety of research duties for the Committee on Small Water Supply Systems. He has also served as project coordinator for a study of the economic valuation of ground water. Gumerman earned his M.S. in engineering and policy from Washington University in St. Louis and his B.A. in environmental science from the University of Pennsylvania.

Anita A. Hall is administrative secretary and senior project assistant at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She served as project assistant for the Committee on Small Water Supply Systems, coordinating meeting arrangements for the committee and production of the committee's report.

David Dobbs is a freelance writer and editor specializing in environmental, building, health, and science issues. His book The Northern Forest, coauthored with Richard Ober, won the Vermont Book Publishers Association ''Book of the Year" award in 1995. Dobbs has edited texts on sports physiology, construction, sailing, horticulture, and natural resource issues; he writes frequently for publications including Popular Science, Forest Notes, The Boston Globe, Vermont, Vermont Life, Parenting, and Eating Well. Originally from Texas, he received his B.A. degree from Oberlin College and now lives in Montpelier, Vermont.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×
Page 205
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×
Page 206
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×
Page 207
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×
Page 208
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×
Page 209
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee on Small Water Supply Systems Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5291.
×
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Small communities violate federal requirements for safe drinking water as much as three times more often than cities. Yet these communities often cannot afford to improve their water service. Safe Water From Every Tap reviews the risks of violating drinking water standards and discusses options for improving water service in small communities. Included are detailed reviews of a wide range of technologies appropriate for treating drinking water in small communities. The book also presents a variety of institutional options for improving the management efficiency and financial stability of water systems.

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