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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Risk Communication and Vaccination: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5861.
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References

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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Risk Communication and Vaccination: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5861.
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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Risk Communication and Vaccination: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5861.
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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Risk Communication and Vaccination: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5861.
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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Risk Communication and Vaccination: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5861.
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Page 24
Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Risk Communication and Vaccination: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5861.
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Page 25
Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Risk Communication and Vaccination: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5861.
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Page 26
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