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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
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The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries

REPORT OF A WORKSHOP

Holly Reed, Rona Briere, and John Casterline, editors
Committee on Population
Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education
National Research Council

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
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NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
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NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

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The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy's purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bruce Alberts and Dr. William A. Wulf are chairman and vice chairman, respectively, of the National Research Council.

This project was funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations that provided support for the project.

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
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Committee On Population

JANE MENKEN (Chair),

Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado, Boulder

CAROLINE H. BLEDSOE,

Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University

JOHN BONGAARTS,

The Population Council, New York

DAVID A. LAM,

Population Studies Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

LINDA G. MARTIN,

RAND, Santa Monica, California

MARK R. MONTGOMERY,

The Population Council, New York, and Department of Economics, State University of New York, Stony Brook

W. HENRY MOSLEY,

Department of Population Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

ALBERTO PALLONI,

Center for Demography and Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison

JAMES P. SMITH,

RAND, Santa Monica, California

BETH J. SOLDO,

Department of Demography, Georgetown University

LINDA J. WAITE,

Population Research Center, University of Chicago

BARNEY COHEN, Director

HOLLY REED, Research Associate

ELIZABETH WALLACE, Project Assistant

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
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Workshop On The Social Processes Underlying Fertility Change In Developing Countries

Presenters

MEGAN BECKETT,

Labor and Population Program, RAND, Santa Monica, California

KATHLEEN CARLEY,

Department of Social and Decision Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University

ANTHONY CARTER,

Department of Anthropology, University of Rochester

JOHN CASTERLINE,

The Population Council, New York

JOHN CLELAND,

Center for Population Studies, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

STEVEN DURLAUF,

Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin, Madison

BARBARA ENTWISLE,

Department of Sociology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

DUFF GILLESPIE,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

JENNY GODLEY,

Department of Sociology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

NOREEN GOLDMAN,

Office of Population Research, Princeton University

DENNIS HODGSON,

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Fairfield University

ROBERT HORNIK,

Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania

DAVID KERTZER,

Departments of Anthropology and History, Brown University

RON LESTHAEGHE,

Interuniversity Programme in Demography, Vrije Universiteit, Brussels, Belgium

PETER MARSDEN,

Department of Sociology, Harvard University

KAREN OPPENHEIM MASON,

Program on Population, East-West Center, Honolulu

EMILY McANANY,

Department of Communication, Santa Clara University

MARK MONTGOMERY,

The Population Council, New York, and State University of New York, Stony Brook

ALBERTO PALLONI,

Center for Demography and Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison

JOSEPH POTTER,

Population Research Center, University of Texas, Austin

EDUARDO RIOS-NETO,

CEDEPLAR, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil

EVERETT M. ROGERS,

Department of Communication and Journalism, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
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STEVEN SINDING,

Population Sciences Division, The Rockefeller Foundation, New York

THOMAS VALENTE,

Department of Population Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

JAMES WALKER,

Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin, Madison

SUSAN WATKINS,

Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

Other Participants

JENNIFER ADAMS,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

SONO AIBE,

The David and Lucille Packard Foundation, Los Altos, California

SIGRID ANDERSON,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

MARY ARENDS-KUENNIG,

The Population Council, New York

RUTH BERG,

The Futures Group International, Washington, D.C.

CAROLINE BLEDSOE,

Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University

JOHN BONGAARTS,

The Population Council, New York

SANDRA BUFFINGTON,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

RANDY BULATAO, Consultant,

Silver Spring, Maryland

MARTHA M. CAMPBELL,

The David and Lucille Packard Foundation, Los Altos, California

PATRICK COLEMAN,

School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University

ELIZABETH FOX,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

STEVEN GREEN,

The Population Council, New York

SARAH HARBISON,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

DOUGLAS HEISLER,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

ROY JACOBSTEIN,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

ELIHU KATZ,

Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania

LAWRENCE KINCAID,

School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University

HANS-PETER KOHLER,

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany

CAROLYN MAKINSON,

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, New York

PHYLLIS PIOTROW,

School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University

WARREN ROBINSON,

Economic Research Associates, Washington, D.C.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
×

JAMES SHELTON,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

JOSEPH SPEIDEL,

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Menlo Park, California

JEFFREY SPIELER,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

ELLEN STARBIRD,

Center for Population, Health, and Nutrition, U.S. Agency for International Development

RICHARD SUZMAN,

Office of Demography of Aging, National Institute on Aging, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

MICHAEL TEITELBAUM,

The Alfred Sloan Foundation, New York

Other Contributors

RENATO ASSUNCAO,

CEDEPLAR, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil

ANDRE CAETANO,

Population Research Center, University of Texas, Austin

SUZANA CAVENAGHI,

Population Research Center, University of Texas, Austin

PAULA MIRANDA-RIBEIRO,

CEDEPLAR, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil

ANNE PEBLEY,

Labor and Population Program, RAND, Santa Monica, California

CAMILLE VANDERHOEFT,

Interuniversity Programme in Demography, Vrije Universiteit, Brussels, Belgium

Staff

BARBARA BOYLE TORREY, Executive Director,

Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

FAITH MITCHELL, Director,

Division on Social and Economic Studies

BARNEY COHEN, Director,

Committee on Population

HOLLY REED, Research Associate,

Committee on Population

LATANYA JOHNSON, Senior Project Assistant,

Committee on Population

RONA BRIERE, Consultant,

Committee on Population

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
×

Preface

This report summarizes presentations and discussions at the Workshop on the Social Processes Underlying Fertility Change in Developing Countries, organized by the Committee on Population of the National Research Council (NRC) in Washington, D.C., January 29-30, 1998. The workshop was funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Fourteen papers were presented at the workshop; they represented both theoretical and empirical perspectives and shed new light on the role that diffusion processes may play in fertility transition. These papers served as the basis for the discussion that is summarized in this report. In addition to this summary, the papers themselves were bound in draft form and distributed to a limited audience in 1998. A selection of the papers will be edited and published as a separate volume.

The committee is grateful to past and present members John Bongaarts, John Casterline, Mark Montgomery, and Alberto Palloni, who served on a subcommittee (chaired by John Casterline) that assumed responsibility for organizing this workshop. In addition, the committee thanks Steven Sinding, who attended one of the planning meetings and provided valuable advice as well as participating in the workshop.

The staff at the National Research Council managed the workshop from start to finish and made it all possible. Barney Cohen, director of the committee, helped develop the framework for the workshop, coordinated the contributions of participants, and gave valuable comments on various drafts of this report. LaTanya Johnson, senior project assistant, organized logistical and travel arrangements. Rona Briere, consultant to the committee, produced the first draft of this

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
×

report. Holly Reed, research associate, edited several subsequent drafts and worked with John Casterline to produce the final report. Finally, Eugenia Grohman, associate director for reports for the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, skillfully edited the manuscript and guided it through the review process.

We are also grateful to the following workshop participants and sponsors, who read the draft manuscript and shared valuable suggestions and comments that were incorporated into the final report: Caroline Bledsoe, Northwestern University; John Cleland, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; David Kertzer, Brown University; Ron Lesthaeghe, Vrije Universiteit, Brussels; Carolyn Makinson, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Karen Oppenheim Mason, East-West Center; Mark Montgomery, The Population Council and State University of New York, Stony Brook; Everett M. Rogers, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Steven Sinding, The Rockefeller Foundation; and Thomas Valente, Johns Hopkins University.

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the NRC's Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making the published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process.

We thank the following individuals for their participation in the review of this report: Ronald Freedman, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan (emeritus); Joshua R. Goldstein, Office of Population Research, Princeton University; Charles Hirschman, Department of Sociology, University of Washington; Geoffrey McNicoll, The Population Council, New York, New York; S. Philip Morgan, Sociology Department, Duke University; Ronald Rindfuss, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina; and Gary Sandefur, Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin. Although the individuals listed above have provided constructive comments and suggestions, it must be emphasized that responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

Most of all, of course, we are grateful to the dedicated participants in the workshop, whose ideas and comments are summarized here. We hope that this publication helps ensure that their work will continue to contribute to research on the processes underlying fertility change and to policy in the field of reproductive health and family planning.

JANE MENKEN, CHAIR

COMMITTEE ON POPULATION

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1999. The Role of Diffusion Processes in Fertility Change in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6475.
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This report summarizes presentations and discussions at the Workshop on the Social Processes Underlying Fertility Change in Developing Countries, organized by the Committee on Population of the National Research Council (NRC) in Washington, D.C., January 29-30, 1998. Fourteen papers were presented at the workshop; they represented both theoretical and empirical perspectives and shed new light on the role that diffusion processes may play in fertility transition. These papers served as the basis for the discussion that is summarized in this report.

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