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Suggested Citation:"6 Summary." National Research Council. 1996. Budgeting for Facilities Maintenance and Repair Activities: Report Number 131. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9226.
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6

Summary

The Operations and Maintenance Committee of the Federal Facilities Council initiated this study to evaluate the impact of a budget guideline in the BRB report Committing to the Cost of Ownership-Maintenance and Repair of Public Buildings (i.e., 2 to 4 percent of the aggregate current replacement value of the facilities in an agency's inventory). In the course of its work, the committee identified four impediments to widespread use and understanding of the guideline. Two such impediments were (1) lack of agreement across agencies in determining which items should and should not be included in an M&R budget and (2) lack of a consistent approach across agencies on a method for determining current replacement value.

This report contains useful guidance on how to make estimates for the coming year's needs for facilities maintenance and repair. It points out what items are and what items are not normally included in a facilities maintenance budget. It also establishes a method of determining current replacement value. The report also identifies structured management techniques and advanced decision support and diagnostic tools that can be used to help minimize facilities maintenance and repair costs.

The issue of how to effectively maintain and operate federal facilities, will continue to be a significant concern for federal facilities managers, especially as resources become more limited and facilities age. In 1996 the Federal Facilities Council will sponsor a new study that will continue and build upon the work of the BRB's Committee on Advanced Maintenance Concepts for Buildings and this committee. The new study will review alternative management approaches for developing maintenance and repair budgets, such as avoiding replacement costs, achieving performance benchmarks, and improving facility reliability. The new study will also

Suggested Citation:"6 Summary." National Research Council. 1996. Budgeting for Facilities Maintenance and Repair Activities: Report Number 131. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9226.
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evaluate examples of condition assessment programs currently in use and explore the role and availability of technology to automate the condition assessment process and the feasibility of applying these technologies.

Federal facilities represent a significant investment of tax dollars. Ensuring that maintenance and repair of such facilities is implemented efficiently and effectively is an important element in protecting that investment. Although not always recognized, effective maintenance and repair are also important in supporting the missions of federal agencies. Lack of an effective M&R program results in the disruption of services when break downs occur and in high penalty costs when minor problems escalate into major repairs as a result of deferred maintenance. The committee hopes that this report will contribute to the development of realistic, long-range M&R programs across federal agencies and facilities that will help protect the investment in and long-term effectiveness of federal facilities.

Suggested Citation:"6 Summary." National Research Council. 1996. Budgeting for Facilities Maintenance and Repair Activities: Report Number 131. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9226.
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Page 28
Suggested Citation:"6 Summary." National Research Council. 1996. Budgeting for Facilities Maintenance and Repair Activities: Report Number 131. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9226.
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Page 29
Next: Appendix A: Findings And Recommendations From Committing To The Cost Of Ownership »
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