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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Commissioned Papers." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Strategies to Protect the Health of Deployed U.S. Forces: Medical Surveillance, Record Keeping, and Risk Reduction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9711.
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Page 236
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Commissioned Papers." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Strategies to Protect the Health of Deployed U.S. Forces: Medical Surveillance, Record Keeping, and Risk Reduction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9711.
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Page 237

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APPENDIX F Commissioned Papers Unexplained Physical Symptoms in Primary Care and the Community: What Might We Learn for Prevention in the Military? (June 1999) LTC Charles Engel, M.D., M.P.H. Wayne Katon, M.D. Medical Corps, U.S. Army Professor and Vice Chair Chief, Gulf War Health Center Department of Psychiatry and Walter Reed Army Medical Center Behavioral Sciences University of Washington Medical School Medically Unexplained Symptoms After Community Disasters: A Review of the Literature (August 1998) Carol North, M.D. Associate Professor of Psychiatry Washington University School of Medicine Neuroendocrine Responses and Susceptibility and Resistance to Inflammatory and Infectious Diseases: Implications for Unexplained Symptoms (November 1998) Esther Sternberg, M.D. Chief, Section on Neuroendocrine Immunology and Behavior National Institute of Mental Health Bethesda, MD Treating Medically Unexplained Symptoms: The Real and Potential Contributions of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (July 1998) Arthur Nezu, Ph.D. Professor and Chair, Department of Clinical and Health Psychology Associate Dean for Research, School of Health Professions Allegheny University of the Health Sciences 236

APPENDIX F 237 What Does the Research on Informational Interventions to Reduce the Stress of Medical Procedures Tell Us About Communicating to Troops the Risks of Deployment? (July 1998) Jean Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N. University of Rochester School of Nursing Strategies to Protect the Health of U.S. Deployed Forces: Surveillance in the Military (September 1998) Lee H. Harrison, M.D. Associate Professor Department of Epidemiology University of Pittsburgh Robert Pinner, M.D. Special Assistant for Surveillance Office of the Director National Center for Infectious Diseases Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta Role of Registries after Military Deployments (June 1998) Arthur K. McDonald Director, Division of Hazard and Injury Data Systems U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Washington, DC Paper on the G-CPR Project (December 1998) W. Edward Hammond, Ph.D. Professor, Division of Medical Informatics Duke University Medical Center Review of the GCPR Project for the Institute of Medicine (December 1998) Clement J. McDonald, M.D. Distinguished Professor of Medicine Regenstrief Institute for Health Care

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Nine years after Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm (the Gulf War) ended in June 1991, uncertainty and questions remain about illnesses reported in a substantial percentage of the 697,000 service members who were deployed. Even though it was a short conflict with very few battle casualties or immediately recognized disease or non-battle injuries, the events of the Gulf War and the experiences of the ensuing years have made clear many potentially instructive aspects of the deployment and its hazards. Since the Gulf War, several other large deployments have also occurred, including deployments to Haiti and Somalia. Major deployments to Bosnia, Southwest Asia, and, most recently, Kosovo are ongoing as this report is written. This report draws on lessons learned from some of these deployments to consider strategies to protect the health of troops in future deployments. In the spring of 1996, Deputy Secretary of Defense John White met with leadership of the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine to explore the prospect of an independent, proactive effort to learn from lessons of the Gulf War and to develop a strategy to better protect the health of troops in future deployments.

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