National Academies Press: OpenBook

Networking Health: Prescriptions for the Internet (2000)

Chapter: Appendix D: Individuals Who Participated in Site Visits or Briefed the Study Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Individuals Who Participated in Site Visits or Briefed the Study Committee." National Research Council. 2000. Networking Health: Prescriptions for the Internet. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9750.
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Page 342

Appendix D—
Individuals Who Participated in Site Visits or Briefed the Study Committee

Site Visit Participants
December 16, 1998

California (San Francisco, Oakland, Palo Alto, and Mountain View)

University of California at San Francisco, Laboratory for Radiological Informatics: Fei Cao, Tony Chou, Bill Dillon, Steve Frankel, David Hoogstrate, H.K. (Bernie) Huang, Andrew Shyh Liang Lou, Laura Snarr, Johannes Stahl, Albert Wong, and X.Q. Zhou.

Kaiser-Permanente: Peter Juhn, Richard Leopold, Anna-Lisa Silvestre, and Valerie Tolous-Shams.

Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD): Andrew DiPaolo, Aubrey Harris, Jay Kohn, and Mike Rouan.

NASA Ames Research Center: Cynthia Bruyns, Shirley Burg, Rei Cheng, Muriel Ross, and Xander Twombly.break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Individuals Who Participated in Site Visits or Briefed the Study Committee." National Research Council. 2000. Networking Health: Prescriptions for the Internet. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9750.
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Page 343

February 2–3, 1999

North Carolina (Greenville and Chapel Hill)

East Carolina University Center for Health Sciences Communication, Telemedicine Program: David C. Balch, Doug Barnum, Christi Brewer, Thomas Feldbush, Susan Gustke, Gloria Jones, Marc Krien, Ted Kummer, Lori Maiolo, Lance Rogers, and Ron Rouse.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Computer Graphics Laboratory: Andrew Ade, Henry Fuchs, and Lars S. Nyland.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine: John Loonsk.

February 10–11, 1999

Seattle, Washington

University of Washington: Thomas Anderson, James Brinkley, Steve Corbato, Sherrilyne Fuller, Tom Furness (Human Interface Technology (HIT) Laboratory), Harold Goldberg, Ira Kalet, Debra Ketchell, Edward Lazowska, Henry Levy, James LoGerfo, Tom Martin, Jean O. Nelson, Tom Norris, Peter Oppenheimer (HIT Laboratory), Brent Stewart, and Suzanne Weghorst (HIT Laboratory).

Regence BlueShield: Magalene Aliu, Kirk Bailey, Jac Davies (Washington State Department of Health), Steven Moe, Donn Morse, Richard Rubin (Foundation for Health Care Quality), Peter Summerville (Community Health Information Technology Alliance), and Jerry Tonkovich.

Briefers During Committee Meetings
September 13–14, 1998

Washington, D.C.

Michael Ackerman and Donald Lindberg, National Library of Medicine; George Strawn, National Science Foundation.break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Individuals Who Participated in Site Visits or Briefed the Study Committee." National Research Council. 2000. Networking Health: Prescriptions for the Internet. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9750.
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Page 344

December 16–18, 1998

Palo Alto, California

Alan Hannan, Frontier/Globalcenter; Hon Hso, SBC Communications; Gary Leiber, WebTV Education; Milo Medin, @Home; Jackie Parker, Intel; Geoff Rutledge, Healtheon; J.J. Singh, Caresoft; Mark Stefik, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center; Hal Varian, dean, School of Information Systems & Management, University of California at Berkeley.

March 1, 1999 - March 2, 1999

Washington, D.C.

Donald Detmer, former chair of the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics; Michael Fitzmaurice, Agency for Health Care Policy Research; Margaret Hamburg, Department of Health and Human Services; Thomas Kalil, National Economic Council; James Ostell, National Center for Biotechnology Information; Richard Satava, Yale University; and William Yasnoff, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Individuals Who Participated in Site Visits or Briefed the Study Committee." National Research Council. 2000. Networking Health: Prescriptions for the Internet. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9750.
×
Page 342
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Individuals Who Participated in Site Visits or Briefed the Study Committee." National Research Council. 2000. Networking Health: Prescriptions for the Internet. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9750.
×
Page 343
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Individuals Who Participated in Site Visits or Briefed the Study Committee." National Research Council. 2000. Networking Health: Prescriptions for the Internet. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9750.
×
Page 344
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Consumer health websites have garnered considerable media attention, but only begin to scratch the surface of the more pervasive transformations the Internet could bring to health and health care. Networking Health examines ways in which the Internet may become a routine part of health care delivery and payment, public health, health education, and biomedical research. Building upon a series of site visits, this book:

  • Weighs the role of the Internet versus private networks in uses ranging from the transfer of medical images to providing video-based medical consultations at a distance.
  • Reviews technical challenges in the areas of quality of service, security, reliability, and access, and looks at the potential utility of the next generation of online technologies.
  • Discusses ways health care organizations can use the Internet to support their strategic interests and explores barriers to a broader deployment of the Internet.
  • Recommends steps that private and public sector entities can take to enhance the capabilities of the Internet for health purposes and to prepare health care organizations to adopt new Internet-based applications.
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