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Strategies That Influence Cost Containment in Animal Research Facilities (2000)

Chapter: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Strategies That Influence Cost Containment in Animal Research Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10006.
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APPENDIX D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Christian E. Newcomer, Chair. Dr. Newcomer is Director of the Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine and Research Associate Professor of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine of the University of North Carolina. Dr. Newcomer is the immediate past president of the American College of Laboratory Medicine and Vice President of the Council on Accreditation, Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC) International. His research interest is the infectious diseases of laboratory animals.

Frederick W. Alt is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, Charles A. Janeway Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital, and a Senior Investigator at the Center for Blood Research in Boston. He studies the molecular and cell biology of immunity. He sits on the editorial boards of Molecular and Cellular Biology, International Immunology, Developmental Immunology, Advances in Immunology, Current Biology, Science, and Immunity. He is a Co-Editor of Current Opinion in Immunology, an Advisory Editor for Journal of Experimental Medicine and a Contributing Editor for Molecular Medicine. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Microbiology, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Ransom L. Baldwin is Professor and Sesnon Chair of the Department of Animal Science of the University of California at Davis. His research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Strategies That Influence Cost Containment in Animal Research Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10006.
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interests are in ruminant digestion, physiology of lactation, nutritional energetics, mechanisms and quantitative aspects of regulation of animal and tissue metabolism, and computer simulation modeling of animal systems. He was a member of the ILAR Guide Committee.

John Donovan is Vice President of Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare, Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. From 1986 to 1994, he was Director of the Office of Laboratory Animal Science at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. He is a Diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM) and was President of ACLAM 1994-5.

Janet Greger is Professor of Nutritional Sciences and Environmental Toxicology of the University of Wisconsin. She was both Associate Dean for Research of the Medical School and Professor of Nutritional Sciences and Environmental Toxicology of the University of Wisconsin, has chaired the all campus animal care and use committee at the University of Wisconsin and is on the Board of Trustees of AAALAC (1992-2000), serving on their strategic planning committee in 1996. She was also on the Board of Directors of the Council on Government Relations and was a member of the NRC committee that wrote the report on Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals, fourth edition.

Joseph Hezir is a Managing Partner of the EOP Group, Inc., and was a co-founder of the Group. He was associated with Office of Management and Budget for 18 years, ending there as Deputy Associate Director for Energy and Science. He specializes in regulatory strategy development and problem solving, and identifying newly created government business opportunities formed from mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures, and new markets.

Charles McPherson is Executive Director of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine and an independent consultant in laboratory animal medicine. He was Chair of the Committee on Revision of Cost and Rate Setting Manual for Animal Research Facilities. He has been a leader in laboratory animal medicine and has published extensively on the care and use of laboratory animals.

Josh Steven Meyer is the managing principal of GPR Planners Collaborative, Inc., and a Registered Architect in the State of New York. Mr. Meyer has participated in the programming and planning of 60 major research projects and more than 40 animal facilities for academic, institutional and corporate clients. His assignments include existing facilities analysis,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Strategies That Influence Cost Containment in Animal Research Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10006.
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facilities master planning, and macro- and micro-level development of laboratory, pilot plant, and animal and toxicology facilities.

Robert B. Price is Executive Vice President for Administration and Business Affairs of the University of Texas Health Center. He has an extensive background in higher education, having held various positions at Texas Tech University, The University of Texas at Arlington, and the Health Science Center at San Antonio. He also was a member of the Board of Directors of the Council on Government Relations 1979-1986 and is currently Chairman of the Board.

Daniel H. Ringler is Professor and Director of the Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School. His research interests are: spontaneous diseases of laboratory animals, comparative medicine and management of research animal resources. He has served on and chaired the Council on Accreditation of the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International. He has also served as president of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine and was a member of the Council of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research.

James R. Swearengen is Director of the Veterinary Medicine Division of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. He has extensive experience in directing multi-species animal care and use programs, supporting medical and surgical research and interfacing with scientific investigators. He has been involved in designing and providing oversight for the construction of animal care and research facilities.

John Vandenbergh is a Professor, Department of Zoology, North Carolina State University. His research areas are environmental control of reproduction, the endocrine basis of behavior, and rodent and primate behavior. He was a member of the committee to revise the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and has been on review panels for NSF and NIH. He is a member of the American Society of Zoologists, Animal Behavior Society (President 1982-83), and Society for the Study of Reproduction.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Strategies That Influence Cost Containment in Animal Research Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10006.
×
Page 145
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Strategies That Influence Cost Containment in Animal Research Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10006.
×
Page 146
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Strategies That Influence Cost Containment in Animal Research Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10006.
×
Page 147
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Care and use of animals in research are expensive, prompting efforts to contain or reduce costs. Components of those costs are personnel, regulatory compliance, veterinary medical care, and laboratory animal management, equipment, and procedures. Many efforts have been made to control and reduce personnel costs, the largest contributing factor to cost, through better facility and equipment design, more efficient use of personnel, and automation of many routine operations. However, there has been no comprehensive, recent analysis of the various cost components or examination of the strategies that have been proven or are purported to decrease the cost of animal facility operation.

Strategies that Influence Cost Containment in Animal Research Facilities examines the current interpretation of governmental policy (Office of Management and Budget Circular A-21) concerning institutional reimbursement for overhead costs of an animal research facility and describes methods for economically operating an animal research facility. This report develops recommendations by which federal auditors and research institutions can establish what cost components of research animal facilities should be charged to institutions' indirect cost pool and what animal research facility cost components should be included in the per diem charges to investigators, and assesses the financial and scientific ramifications that these criteria would have among federally funded institutions. Further, the report determines the cost components of laboratory animal care and use in biomedical research and assesses and recommends methods of cost containment for institutions maintaining animals for biomedical research.

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