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Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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VI
ANNEX

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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Annex A: Biographies of Contributors*

GRANT BLACK

Grant Black is a Research Associate at the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University, where he is involved in research related to the economics of science. He has contributed to research funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Andrew W.Mellon Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the United States Agency for International Development. He has also participated in national and international conferences on science and technology policy issues.

Black’s research interests center on the economics of science, particularly the role of knowledge and its movement in the economy and the careers of scientists. Recent research has examined the importance of the local knowledge infrastructure on small-firm innovation, patterns of research collaboration, and individual patenting behavior. Other research has focused on the impact of immigration on scientific labor markets; women and minorities in the sciences; and educational training and labor market outcomes in the emerging field of bioinformatics. Black also has interests in the Small Business Innovation Research Program, the largest federal R&D program targeting small high-tech businesses.

Black received a B.S. and an M.A. in economics from the University of Missouri, St. Louis. He has taught economics at the University of Missouri, St.

*  

As of July 2001.

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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Louis, and Georgia State University since 1994. He will serve as a visiting scholar in the economics department at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, in 2002.

WESLEY COHEN

Wesley Cohen (Ph.D., Economics, Yale University, 1981) is Professor of Economics and Social Science in the Department of Social and Decision Science at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He also holds faculty appointments in CMU’s Department of Engineering and Public Policy and its Heinz School of Policy and Management.

Focusing on the economics of technological change, Cohen’s research examines the links between firm size, market structure and innovation, firms’ abilities to exploit outside knowledge, the determinants of innovative activity across industries and firms, the knowledge flows affecting innovation, the means that firms use to protect their intellectual property, and the links between university research and industrial R&D, among other related subjects. Recently, he coordinated a major comparative survey research study in the U.S. and Japan on the nature and determinants of industrial R&D, and is currently engaged in a multi-year, NSF-funded research project on patenting and its impact on innovation.

He has published in numerous scholarly journals, including the American Economic Review, the Economic Journal, Review of Economics and Statistics, the Journal of Industrial Economics, the Administrative Science Quarterly, Management Science and the Strategic Management Journal, and served for five years as a Main Editor for Research Policy. He is also currently serving on the National Academies’ Committee on Intellectual Property Rights in the Knowledge-Based Economy.

He has taught courses on the economics of technological change, the economics of entrepreneurship, industrial organization economics, policy analysis and organizational behavior.

KENNETH FLAMM

Kenneth Flamm is Dean Rusk Chair in International Affairs at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin.

From 1993 to 1995, Flamm served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Economic Security and Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Dual Use Technology Policy. He was awarded the Department’s Distinguished Public Service Medal in 1995 by Defense Secretary William J.Perry. Prior to his service at the Defense Department, he spent eleven years as a Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at The Brookings Institution.

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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Flamm has been a professor of economics at the Institute Tecnológico Autónomo de México in Mexico City, the University of Massachusetts, and George Washington University. He has also been an adviser to the Director General of Income Policy in the Mexican Ministry of Finance and a consultant to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the World Bank, the National Academy of Sciences, the Latin American Economic System, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S Agency for International Development, and the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress.

Among Dr. Flamm’s publications are Mismanaged Trade? Strategic Policy and the Semiconductor Industry (1996), Changing the Rules: Technological Change, International Competition, and Regulation in Communications (ed., with Robert Crandell, 1989), Creating the Computer (1988), and Targeting the Computer (1987). He is currently completing an analytical study of the post-Cold War defense industrial base.

Kenneth Flamm, an expert on international trade and the high technology industry and member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Government-Industry Partnerships for the Development of New Technologies, teaches classes in micro-economic theory, international trade, and defense economics. He received a bachelor’s degree from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

MICHAEL MCGEARY

Michael McGeary is a political scientist specializing in science, health, and technology policy analysis and writing. He works as an independent consultant to government agencies, foundations, and nonprofit organizations on issues related to science and technology. His areas of expertise include funding of research and development; research priority setting, funding, and management of biomedical research at NIH; graduate education, training, and employment of scientists and engineers; merit review systems at NSF and NIH; and the role of research in industrial innovation.

McGeary was on the staff of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) from 1981 until 1995, where he was staff director for more than a dozen major reports. Since leaving the NAS, as a consultant, he has helped draft several NAS reports, including Allocating Federal Funds for Science and Technology, trends in the Federal Science and Technology (FS&T) budget (1996–1998), and Trends in Federal Support of Research and Graduate Education. He has also worked on health research issues. As a consultant, he helped draft the Institute of Medicine report Scientific Opportunities and Public Needs: Improving Priority Setting and Public Input at the National Institutes of Health (1998) and analyzed the implementation of the War on Cancer for the President’s Cancer Panel (1999).

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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Between graduate study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1972– 1976) and coming to the NAS, Mr. McGeary taught political science and urban studies at Wellesley College (1976–78) and worked on studies of presidential management at the National Academy of Public Administration (1978–1980). His undergraduate degree is from Harvard College.

PAULA STEPHAN

Paula Stephan is a Professor of Economics, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University, and served as the founding associate dean of the school from 1996–2001. Her research interests focus on the careers of scientists and engineers and the process by which knowledge moves across institutional boundaries in the economy. Stephan’s research has been supported by the Alfred P.Sloan Foundation, the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the Exxon Education Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the U.S. Department of Labor. She has served on several National Research Council committees including the Committee on Dimensions, Causes, and Implications of Recent Trends in the Careers of Life Scientists, Committee on Methods of Forecasting Demand and Supply of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers, and the Committee to Assess the Portfolio of the Science Resources Studies Division of NSF. She is a regular participant in the National Bureau of Economic Research’s meetings in Higher Education and has testified before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Basic Science. She currently is serving a three year term as a member of CEOSE, the National Science Foundation’s Committee on Equal Opportunity in Science and Engineering.

Dr. Stephan graduated from Grinnell College (Phi Beta Kappa) with a B.A. in Economics and earned both her M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Michigan. She has published numerous articles in journals such as The American Economic Review, Science, The Journal of Economic Literature, Economic Inquiry and Social Studies of Science. Stephan coauthored with Sharon Levin Striking the Mother Lode in Science, published by Oxford University Press, 1992. The book was reviewed in Science, Chemical and Engineering News, Journal of Economic Literature, The Southern Economic Journal and The Journal of Higher Education. Her research on the careers of scientists has been the focus of articles in The Economist, Science and The Scientist. Stephan is a frequent presenter at meetings such as the American Economic Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Society for the Social Studies of Science. Stephan reviews regularly for the National Science Foundation and a number of academic journals including The American Economic Review, The American Sociological Review, Economic Inquiry, The Journal of Political Economy, and The Journal of Human Resources.

Dr. Stephan has lectured extensively in Europe. She was a visiting scholar at

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung, Berlin, Germany, intermittently during the period 1992–1995.

JOHN WALSH

John Walsh is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Walsh’s current research focuses on industrial R&D in the U.S. and Japan, including the impact of patents and patent policy on innovation, and the relations between universities and industrial research.

He has been published in numerous journals, including the Journal of the American Society for Information Sciences, Public Opinion Quarterly, Work and Occupations, Social Studies of Science and Communications of the ACM. Dr. Walsh authored Supermarkets Transformed: Understanding Organizational and Technological Innovation and coauthored Mapping Crime in its Community Setting. Dr. Walsh has contributed book reviews for publications such as the American Journal of Sociology, Contemporary Sociology, and Management Learning.

Dr. Walsh received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Northwestern University.

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
×

Annex B: Participants List* 25 April 2000 Conference

Stanley Abramowitz

National Institute of Science & Technology

Zoltan Acs

University of Baltimore

Ted Agres

Washington Times

Jane Alexander*

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

J.M.Alliare

Pablo Amor

Delegation of the European Commission

Kiyoshi Ando

Nikkei

Robert Archibald

The College of William and Mary

David Audretsch

Indiana University

Gary Bachula

U.S. Department of Commerce

Wendy Baldwin

National Institutes of Health

Michael Baum

NIST

Ed Behrens

Procter and Gamble

Arpad Bergh

Optoelectronics Industry Development Association

Grant Black

Georgia State University

*  

Speakers

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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Robert Blackburn*

Chiron

David Blumenthal

Harvard Medical School/ Massachusetts General Hospital

Congressman Sherwood Boehlert*

U.S. House of Representatives

Mark Boguski*

National Center for Biotechnology Information

John K.Boidock

Texas Instruments Incorporated

Jeff Bond

BMDO/Department of Defense

Shannon Bond

Government Accounting Office

William Bonvillian*

Office of Senator Lieberman

Michael Borrus*

Petkevich & Partners

Robert Boyd

Knight Ridder

Richard Bradshaw

Department of Enegry

Jeffrey Brancato

Office of the Executive Vice Provost

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Karen Brown

National Institute of Standards and Technology

John Burgess

The Washington Post

William Camp

Sandia National Laboratories

Peter Cahill

BRTRC, Inc.

Elias Carayannis

ISTP

Kelly Carnes

U.S. Department of Commerce

Marvin Cassman*

National Institutes of Health

Mike Champness

Business-Higher Education Forum

Y.T.Chien

National Science Foundation

McAlister Clabaugh

National Research Council

Mel Ciment

National Science Foundation

Iain Cockburn

Boston University

Timothy Coffey*

Naval Research Laboratory

Wes Cohen*

Carnegie Mellon University

Sara Comley

International Observer, Press

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
×

Rita Colwell

National Science Foundation

Ereceline Companyo

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

B.Anne Craib

Dewey Ballantine

Jack Crowley

Michael Czinkota

Georgetown University

Stephen Dahms*

San Diego State University

K.C.Das

Office of the Secretary of Technology, Commonwealth of Virginia

Mike Davey

Congressional Research Service

Lance Davis

National Academy of Engineering

Will Davis

OECD Washington Center

Adriaan M. de Graaf

National Science Foundation

Brian Delroy

Embassy of Australia

Pierre Desrochers

Johns Hopkins University

Gerald Dinneen

National Research Council

Robert Eagan

Sandia National Laboratories

Chris Edwards

Joint Economic Committee

Mitch Eggers

Genometrix, Inc.

Rebecca Eisenberg

University of Michigan Law School

Stephan Esquires

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Stephen Eule

House Science Committee

Fouad Ezra

Procter & Gamble

Maryann Feldman*

Johns Hopkins University

Frank Fernandez

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

David Festa

U.S. Department of Commerce

Kevin Finneran

Issues in Science and Technology

Eric A.Fischer

The Library of Congress

Kenneth Flamm*

Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
×

Alexander Flax

National Academy of Engineering

Sam Fuller

Analog Devices

Cita Furlani

Advanced Technology Program

R.Michael Gadbaw

International Law and Policy

Paul G.Gaffney

Office of Naval Research

Lori Garver

National Aeronautics and Space

Administration

James F.Gibbons

Paul G. Allen Center for Integrated Learning

Dan Goldin*

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Jorge A.Goldstein

Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox

David Goldston*

Office of Congressman Boehlert

Jo Anne Goodnight

National Institutes of Health

Jeffrey L.Gren

Medical Equipment and Instrumentation

Margaret Grucza

Industrial Research Institute

Victoria D.Hadfield

Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International

Serge Hagege

Embassy of France

Lee Halcomb

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Bronwyn Hall

National Bureau of Economic Research

Rebecca Henderson

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Derek Hill

National Science Foundation

Alice Hogan

National Security and International Affairs

Paul M.Horn*

IBM Corporation

John B.Horrigan

National Research Council

Thomas Howell, Esq.

Dewey Ballantine

Kent Hughes

The Woodrow Wilson Center

William James

Research & Development

John Jankowski

National Science Foundation

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
×

Kenan Patrick Jarboe

Dale Jorgenson*

Harvard University

Tom Kalil*

National Economic Council

Christine Kelley

National Institutes of Health

Maryellen Kelley

National Institute of Standards and Technology

Kathleen Kingscott

International Business Machines

Karen Koppeschaar

Embassy of the Netherlands

Jeffrey D.Kueter

National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing

Scott Kulicke

Kulicke and Soffa Industries, Inc.

Patrice Laget

Delegation of the European Commission

Ralph Landau

Stanford University

Jean Francois Large

Embassy of France

Roif Lehming

National Science Foundation

Richard Levin

Yale University

Rachel E.Levinson

Office of Science and Technology Policy

Harris Liebergot

National Institute of Science and Technology

Michael Lieberman

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

William Long

Business Performance Research Associates

Janet Lynch

General Electric

Tom Mays

Morrison and Foerster, LLP

Anne-Marie Mazza

National Research Council

Clark McFadden*

Dewey Ballantine

Robert McGuckin

Economic Research

Steve Merrill

National Research Council

Ernest Moniz

Department of Energy

Youhyoun Moon

Korean Embassy

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
×

Duncan Moore

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Gordon Moore*

Intel Corp.

William Morin

R. Wayne Sayer and Associates

Mark Myers

Xerox Corporation

Kesh S.Narayanan

National Science Foundation

Karah Nazor

National Research Council

Richard Nelson

Columbia University

Robert Norwood

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Richard Nunno

Congressional Research Service

John Oldfield

Conference Board

Scott Pace

RAND

Erik Pages

NCDE

Edward Penhoet*

University of California, Berkeley

Barry Press

Washington CORE

Susan Pucie

National Institutes of Health

Samuel M.Rankin III

American Mathematical Society

Alan Rapoport

National Science Foundation

Diane Raynes

Government Accounting Office

Lawrence M.Rausch

National Science Foundation

Proctor Reid

National Academy of Engineering

Greg Reyes*

Schering-Plough

Josephine Robinson

Joint Economic Committee

Philippa Rogers

British Embassy

Alton D.Romig*

Science, Technology, and Components

Sally Rood

Federal Laboratory Consortium

Peter Rooney

Council on Competitiveness

Leon Rosenberg*

Princeton University

Richard Rosenbloom

Harvard Business School

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
×

Deborah Rudolph

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers

Richard Russell

House Committee on Science

R.Wayne Sayer

R. Wayne Sayer & Associates

Jeffrey Schloss

National Human Genome Research Institute

Craig Schultz

National Research Council

Alan Sears

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Arun Seraphin

Office of Senator Joseph Lieberman

Jerry Sheehan

National Research Council

Richard Sheehan

Claudine Simson

Nortel Networks

Larry Smarr

National Center for Supercomputing Applications

William Spencer*

SEMATECH

Todd Spener

Charter Financial

Richard Spivack

National Institute of Standards and Technology

Kathryn E.Stein

Office of Therapeutics Research and Review

Paula E.Stephan*

Georgia State University

Gary W.Strong

Information Technology Office

Michael Steurewalt

National Science Foundation

Debbie Stine

National Research Council

Richard Swaja

National Institutes of Health

Gregory Tassey

National Institute of Standards and Technology

David Tennenhouse

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Richard Thayer

Telecommunications and Technologies International

Roland Tibbetts

Phillipe Tondeur

National Science Foundation

Alan Tonelson

U.S. Business and Industrial Council Educational Foundation

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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Charles Trimble*

Trimble Navigation

Eric Truett

National Research Council

Robert Tuch

German-American Academic Council

James Turner

House Committee on Science

Paul Uhlir

National Academy of Sciences

Debra Van Opstal

Council on Competitiveness

Samuel Venneri

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Nicholas Vonortas

George Washington University

Caroline Wagner

RAND

John P.Walker

Axys Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Andrew Wang

National Institute of Standards and Technology

Kevin Wheeler

Committee on Small Business

Charles W.Wessner

Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy

James Wilson

House Science Commitee

Sandra Wilson

OECD Washington Center

Patrick Windham*

Windham Associates

Raymond Wolf

National Science Foundation

Isabel Wolte

Embassy of Austria

Benjamin Wu

House Subcommittee on Technology

William A.Wulf

National Academy of Engineering

Ed Zadjura

General Accounting Office

Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
×

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Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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Suggested Citation:"VI. Annex." National Research Council. 2001. Capitalizing on New Needs and New Opportunities: Government-Industry Partnerships in Biotechnology and Information Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10281.
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National Research Council. 2000. Experiments in International Benchmarking of U.S. Research Fields. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

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This report addresses a topic of recognized policy concern. To capture the benefits of substantial U.S. investments in biomedical R&D, parallel investments in a wide range of seemingly unrelated disciplines are also required. This report summarizes a major conference that reviewed our nation’s R&D support for biotechnology and information technologies. The volume includes newly commissioned research and makes recommendations and findings concerning the important relationship between information technologies and biotechnology. It emphasizes the fall off in R&D investments needed to sustain the growth of the U.S. economy and to capitalize on the growing investment in biomedicine. It also encourages greater support for inter-disciplinary training to support new areas such as bioinformatics and urges more emphasis on and support for multi-disciplinary research centers.

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