National Academies Press: OpenBook

Science, Medicine, and Animals (2004)

Chapter: Resources and Web Links

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Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
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RESOURCES AND WEB LINKS

Advances in Medicine through Animal Research

Americans for Medical Progress Educational Foundation, http://www.ampef.org/history.htm

Significant Events of the Last 125 Years

American Society for Microbiology, http://www.asmusa.org/mbrsrc/archive/SIGNIFICANT.htm

FDA History

US Food and Drug Administration, http://www.fda.gov/oc/history/

Science and Conscience: The Animal Experimentation Controversy

The Humane Society of the United States

National Association for Humane and Environmental Education, www.humaneteen.org

In the Name of Science: Issues in Responsible Animal Experimentation

F. Barbara Orlans

Oxford University Press, New York, 1993.

The Scalpel and The Butterfly: The War Between the Animal Research and Animal Protection

Deborah Rudacille

Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, 2000.

The Animal Research Controversy: Protest, Process and Public Policy. An Analysis of Strategic Issues

Andrew N. Rowan and Franklin M. Loew with Joan Weer

Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy, N. Grafton, MA, 1995.

Of Mice, Models and Men. A Critical Analysis of Animal Research

Andrew N. Rowan

State University of New York Press, Albany, 1984.

Animal Research Is Vital to Medicine

Jack H. Botting and Adrian R. Morrison

Scientific American: http://www.sciam.com/0297issue/0297botting.html

Issues and Answers

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Center for Animal Welfare

http://labanimalwelfare.org/product_testing.html#crueltyfree

The Black Death

American University Trade and Environment Database, http://www.american.edu/TED/BUBONIC.HTM

Robert Koch, Top-Biography.com

What is Biomedical Research?

Michigan Society for Medical Research, http://www.mismr.org/educational/biomedres.html

Laboratory Animal Law

Kevin Dolan, Blackwell Science Ltd, Oxford, UK, 2000.

The Use of Animals as Models of Humans in Biomedical Research

Dr. Michael Festing

Animals and Alternatives in Testing—History, Science and Ethics

Joanne Zurlo, Deborah Rudacille and Alan M. Goldberg, Mary Ann Liebert Inc., New York, 1994

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

LINKS

On line Information on Animal Research

Alternatives to Animal Testing

http://sis.nlm.nih.gov/altread.htm

Altweb: Alternatives to Animal Testing on the Web

http://altweb.jhsph.edu

Americans for Medical Progress Educational Foundation

http://www.ampef.org

Firstgov for Kids

http://www.kids.gov

The Beginnings: The Laboratory and Animal Studies

http://www.fda.gov/fdac/special/newdrug/begin.html

Cosmetic Regulations

http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/cos-toc.html

Animal Testing

http://www.fda.gov/cvm/index/consumer/con15.htm

Animal Research Facts

http://www.fbresearch.org/facts.html

Interactive Frog Dissection

http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/go/frog/

Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals

http://www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/labrats

International Development of Animal Models

http://www.nih.gov/science/models

Johns Hopkins Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing

http://caat.jhsph.edu/

Kids 4 Research

http://www.kids4research.org

National Agricultural Library (Audiovisuals for Animal Care, Use, and Welfare)

http:/www.nalusda.gov/awic/pubs/aw200001.htm

Office of Animal Care and Use (Printable Posters)

http://oacu.od.nih.gov/posters/index.htm

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

Public Health Service Policy on Lab Animal Care Tutorial

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/olaw/tutorial/index.htm

Questions People Ask about Animals in Research

http://www.the-aps.org/pub_affairs/animals/index.htm

United States Office of Science and Technology Policy

http://www.ostp.gov

USDA Animal Welfare Fact Sheet

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/oa/pubs/awact.html

Why Animal Models?

http://www.ahc.umn.edu/rar/MNAALAS/Models/html

RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS AND STUDENTS

(posters, books, pamphlets, brochures, newsletters)

The ABCs of Animal Research—a colorful glossary explaining the use of animals in research and testing and the benefits animal research has produced. For middle and high schools. Contact Massachusetts Society for Medical Research at 978-251-1556 or www.msmr.org.

Animal Research: Fact vs. Myth—provides up-to-date answers to common misconceptions about animal research. Refutes the major claims of the antiresearch element of the animal rights movement. Contact the Foundation for Biomedical Research at 202-457-0654 or www.fbresearch.org.

Animal Sheets—set of four reference sheets detailing the contributions of different species to specific research advances. Set includes sheets on rodents, cats, dogs, nonhuman primates, and other animals. Contact the Foundation for Biomedical Research at 202-457-0654 or www.fbresearch.org.

Biologists Discover Amazing Things—a colorful classroom poster outlining the contributions many animal species make to biomedical advances. For middle and high schools. Contact the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology at 301-530-7000 or www.faseb.org.

Caring for Laboratory Animals—discusses the humane use of animals in research and explains how animals are used as research subjects and veterinary patients. Also covers legal protection of animals in research and explains the accreditation process for facilities. Contact the Foundation for Biomedical Research at 202-457-0654 or www.fbresearch.org.

Casey’s Awakening—an illustrated storybook describing the role played by animals in research and testing and the care that laboratory animals receive. Accompanied by a guide of critical and creative thinking activities for teachers. For middle schools. Contact the Massachusetts Society for Medical Research at 978-251-1556 or www.msmr.org.

Exploring the Mysteries of Aging—outlines the contributions of animal research to the health of our aging population. Contact the Foundation for Biomedical Research at 202-457-0654 or www.fbresearch.org.

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

Friends and Partners: A Story about the Partnership of Man and Animals—an illustrated booklet describing the partnership between people and animals in the search for advances in biomedicine. Included are illustrations of animals, as well as some photographs of children who have been helped by animal research. For elementary schools. Contact the Southwest Association for Education in Biomedical Research at 520-621-3931 or www.swaebr.org.

Human and Animal Disease Fact Sheets—a series of fact sheets on human and animal disease and conditions. Fact sheets provide statistics about the disease or condition; describe the history of research on that disease; and outline some of the treatments and advances that have resulted from that research. Explains the specific role animals have played in research on these topics. For high schools and colleges. Contact the California Biomedical Research Association at 916-558-1515 or www.ca-biomed.org.

LAB Notes: Toxicology—a newsletter for teachers and students to introduce the science of toxicology and risk assessment. Includes “A Primer in Toxicology,” “Poison Control Facts,” “Risk Assessment,” “The Use of Animals in Toxicology,” “Alternatives,” and more. Accompanied by classroom activities. For middle and high schools. Contact the Massachusetts Society for Medical Research at 978-251-1556 or www.msmr.org.

The Lucky Puppy—an interactive coloring storybook about animals and research. Contains coloring, drawing, and other activities. For elementary schools. Contact the North Carolina Association for Biomedical Research at 919-785-1304 or www.ncabr.org.

Overview of the Issues—a comprehensive manuscript pertaining to the use of animals in laboratory research. This manuscript is ideal for anyone interested in learning the fundamental yet important facts, figures, and statistics about the use of animals in laboratory research. Contact the Humane Society of the United States at 202-452-1100 or www.hsus.org.

People and Animals, Sharing the World—an interdisciplinary program designed to introduce and explain concepts in veterinary medicine and to explore value judgments as they relate to animals. A unique aspect of these materials is that they combine activities in social studies, science, citizenship, career education, and mathematics for an overall learning program. For elementary schools. Contact the American Veterinary Medical Association at 847-925-8070 or www.avma.org.

People and Animals: United for Health—an interactive, poster-sized health and science calendar. Topics are—Infectious Disease, Aging, Diabetes, AIDS and Feline Leukemia, Dental Health, Heart Disease, Poison Control and Product Safety, Biodiversity and the Environment, Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Body Organs and Transplantation, The Five Senses and the Brain, and Nutrition. Accompanied by the HEADS ON! For Healthy Living teacher’s guide of critical and creative thinking activities, and teacher training workshops of the same name. For elementary schools. Contact the Massachusetts Society for Medical Research at 978-251-1556 or www.msmr.org.

People and Animals: United for Health—a curriculum resource package that serves as a background supplement on the use of animals in biomedical research, education, and testing for science curricula. Includes a 13-unit reference manual, set of 169 slides, discussion guide, and teacher’s guide of critical and creative thinking activities. For middle and high schools. Contact the Massachusetts Society for Medical Research at 978-251-1556 or www.msmr.org.

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

Principles and Guidelines for the Use of Animals in Precollege Education—a brochure offering a framework for the humane study of animals in precollege classrooms. For middle and high schools. Contact the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research at 202-334-1264 or www.national-academies.org/ilar.

The Proud Achievements of Animal Research—focuses on the contributions of animal research to today’s society and warns of the problems that would be created if animal research were stopped. Also gives a short chronological list of major medical breakthroughs utilizing animal research. Contact the Foundation for Biomedical Research at 202-457-0654 or www.fbresearch.org.

Respect for Life—a brochure on research animals and their care, their contribution to health, and the search for alternatives. Contact the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences at 919-541-3345 or www.niehs.nih.gov

Rx for Science Literacy: The What, Where, How, and Why of Health Science Research—This 300-page K-12 teacher manual captures the complex research process and addresses the care and use of animals in the biomedical research process in an easy-to-follow, easy-to-use format. It is filled with background information, handouts, lesson plans, and activities to assist teachers of all grade levels in the classroom. This curriculum has been extensively revised and updated three times, most recently in August 2002. Additions include chapters on therapeutic cloning, bioscience careers, and transgenic animals. Endorsed by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. Contact the North Carolina Association for Biomedical Research at 919-785-1304 or www.ncabr.org.

Science and Conscience—Written for high school students and their teachers, Science and Conscience explores the facts and issues at the heart of the animal experimentation controversy. Major topics include the history of and current trends in animal experimentation, the use of animals in education, biomedical research, and product testing, and the development of laws, alternatives, and other initiatives to improve standards for animal care and scientific research alike. This full-color, 43-page booklet contains critical-thinking questions, projects, suggestions for independent study, and meaningful activities for high school classes and student clubs. It is an excellent resource for the individual student activist as well as a valuable teaching tool for high school biology instructors. Contact the National Association for Humane and Environmental Education at 202-452-1100 or www.humaneteen.org.

Science Beat—a color newsletter defining biomedical research and introducing students to the use of animals in biomedical research, including the laws and regulations that govern animal research. For middle and high schools. Contact the Massachusetts Society for Medical Research at 978-251-1556 or www.msmr.org.

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

Understanding the Use of Animals in Biomedical Research—excellent primer on animal research. Major points covered include the benefits to society of animal research, the various roles animals play in research, the validity of scientific research, some basic trends about the numbers of animals used, a brief overview of their care and treatment, as well as the laws and regulations that protect them. Finally, there is a section devoted to alternatives and what that really means. Contact the Foundation for Biomedical Research at 202-457-0654 or www.fbresearch.org.

The Use of Animals in Product Safety Testing—brief overview of the issue of animals in safety testing. Covers the science of toxicology and federal regulations and explains the myth of “cruelty-free” products and alternatives. Contact the Foundation for Biomedical Research at 202-457-0654 or www.fbresearch.org.

Women’s Health: Developing Treatments and Cures through Animal Research—highlights the contributions of animal research to women’s health. Contact the Foundation for Biomedical Research at 202-457-0654 or www.fbresearch.org.

ANIMAL RESEARCH REGULATIONS AND GUIDELINES

Animal Welfare Act, http://www.nal.usda.gov/awic/legislation/awa.htm

Health Research Extension Act of 1985,

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/olaw/references/hrea1985.htm

NetVet Veterinary Government and Law Resources, http://netvet.wustl.edu/law.htm

Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/olaw/references/hrea1985.htm

USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Animal Care Policy Manual

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ac/polman.html

ORGANIZATIONS DISCUSSED

Animal Welfare Information Center (AWIC), http://www.nal.usda.gov/awic

Animal Welfare Institute, www.animalwelfare.com

Applied Research Ethics National Association (ARENA), www.primr.org/arena.html

Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International (AAALAC International), http://www.aaalac.org

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

Food and Drug Administration (FDA), http://www.fda.gov

Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR), http://www.national-academies.org/ilar

Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), http://iccvam.niens.nih.gov

National Institutes of Health (NIH), http://www.nih.gov

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ac/

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS

American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, http://www.aalas.org

American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, http://www.aclam.org

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, http://www.aspca.org

American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners, http://www.aslap.org

American Veterinary Medical Association, http://www.avma.org

Canadian Council on Animal Care, http://www.ccac.ca

Foundation for Biomedical Research, http://www.fbresearch.org

Humane Society of the United States, http://www.hsus.org

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), www.iacuc.org

National Association for Biomedical Research (NABR), http://www.nabr.org

Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R), http://www.aamc.org/research/primr

Scientists Center for Animal Welfare (SCAW), http://www.scaw.com

States United for Biomedical Research, http://statesforbiomed.org

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS
500 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project.

The development of this report was supported by Grant No. RR11611 from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and its publication and dissemination were supported by the Presidents’ Circle Communications Initiative of the National Academies, Contract No. N01-OD-4-2139, Task Order 135 from the NIH, American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, American Psychological Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, Society of Toxicology, Merck Research Laboratories, and Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

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Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Bruce M. Alberts is president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Wm. A. Wulf is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bruce M. Alberts and Dr. Wm. A. Wulf are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.

www.national-academies.org

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

COMMITTEE TO UPDATE SCIENCE, MEDICINE, AND ANIMALS

Peter A. Ward (Chair),

University of Michigan Medical School, Department of Pathology, Ann Arbor, Michigan

G. F. Gebhart,

University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa

Lilly-Marlene Russow,

Purdue University, Department of Philosophy, West Lafayette, Indiana

William S. Stokes,

National Institute of Environmental Health Science, Animal and Alternative Resources, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina

Michael F. Festing,

University of Leicester, MRC Toxicology Unit, Leicester, United Kingdom

CONSULTANTS

Leslie Nader,

Massachusetts Society for Medical Research, Inc., North Chelmsford, Massachusetts

Susan Offner,

Lexington High School, Science Department, Lexington, Massachusetts

INSTITUTE FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Peter A. Ward (Chair),

University of Michigan Medical School, Department of Pathology, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Stephen W. Barthold,

University of California- Davis, Center for Comparative Medicine, Davis, California

Rosemary W. Elliott,

Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Buffalo, New York

Michael F. Festing,

University of Leicester, MRC Toxicology Unit, Leicester, United Kingdom

Janet C. Gonder,

Pinehurst, North Carolina

Coenraad F.M. Hendriksen,

National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Central Animal Laboratories, Bilthoven, The Netherlands

Jay R. Kaplan,

Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Department of Comparative Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Hilton J. Klein,

Merck Research Laboratories, Department of Laboratory Animal Resources, West Point, Pennsylvania

William Morton,

University of Washington, National Primate Research Center, Seattle, Washington

Randall J. Nelson,

University of Tennessee, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Memphis, Tennessee

Emilie F. Rissman,

University of Virginia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Charlottesville, Virginia

Lilly-Marlene Russow,

Purdue University, Department of Philosophy, West Lafayette, Indiana

William S. Stokes,

National Institute of Environmental Health Science, Animal and Alternative Resources, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina

Michael K. Stoskopf,

North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, North Carolina

Thomas Wolfle,

Cambridge, Maryland

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

STAFF

Joanne Zurlo, Director

Jennifer Obernier, Program Officer

Kathleen Beil, Administrative Assistant

Marsha Barrett, Project Assistant

Susan Vaupel, Editor

INSTITUTE FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL RESEARCH

Since 1952, the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) has developed guidelines and disseminated information on the scientific, technological and ethical use of animals and related biological resources in research, testing and education. ILAR promotes high quality, humane care of animals and the appropriate use of animals and alternatives. ILAR functions within the mission of the National Academies as an adviser to the federal government, the biomedical research community and the public. www.national-academies.org/ilar

THE COMMITTEE TO UPDATE SCIENCE, MEDICINE, AND ANIMALS WISHES TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE FOLLOWING INDIVIDUALS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THIS PUBLICATION:

Thaddeus Graczyk, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Baltimore, Maryland

Victoria Hampshire, US Food and Drug Administration, Division of Surveillance, Office of Surveillance/Compliance, Center for Veterinary Medicine, Rockville, Maryland

Nirbhay Kumar, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Baltimore, Maryland

Chris McNickle, Pathology Associates, International, Frederick, Maryland

Stephen Rockwood, The Jackson Laboratory, Induced Mutant Resource, Bar Harbor, Maine

Michael Rogawski, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, Maryland

Deborah Rudacille, Johns Hopkins University, Center for Talented Youth, Center for Distance Education

The Committee would like to credit the following organizations and individuals for the photographs

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
×

used in this publication: The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, the US Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute for Mental Health, the New England Journal of Medicine, Jim Gathany (mosquito photograph), and Jennifer Merriam (green mouse photograph).

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the NRC’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this report:

Bruce Fuchs, National Institutes of Health, Office of Science Education, Bethesda, Maryland

Karen Hoffman, North Carolina Association for Biomedical Research, Raleigh, North Carolina

Judy Jones, East Chapel Hill High School, Science Department, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Lorne Mendell, SUNY at Stony Brook, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Stony Brook, New York

Janice M. Miller, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, National Animal Disease Center, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, Iowa

James W. Patrick, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

Andrew N. Rowan, Humane Society of the United States, Washington, DC

Bernard A. Schwetz, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Office of the Commissioner, Rockville, Maryland

Eve Lloyd Thompson, The Bernice Barbour Foundation, Wellington, Florida

Stephen Zawistowski, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, New York, New York

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by David R. Challoner, University of Florida, Gainesville, and John G. Vandenbergh, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. Appointed by the National Research Council, they were responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Resources and Web Links." National Research Council. 2004. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10733.
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Science, Medicine, and Animals Get This Book
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Science, Medicine, and Animals explains the role that animals play in biomedical research and the ways in which scientists, governments, and citizens have tried to balance the experimental use of animals with a concern for all living creatures. An accompanying Teacher’s Guide is available to help teachers of middle and high school students use Science, Medicine, and Animals in the classroom. As students examine the issues in Science, Medicine, and Animals, they will gain a greater understanding of the goals of biomedical research and the real-world practice of the scientific method in general.

Science, Medicine, and Animals and the Teacher's Guide were written by the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research and published by the National Research Council of the National Academies. The report was reviewed by a committee made up of experts and scholars with diverse perspectives, including members of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Institutes of Health, the Humane Society of the United States, and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The Teacher’s Guide was reviewed by members of the National Academies’ Teacher Associates Network.

Science, Medicine, and Animals is recommended by the National Science Teacher's Association.

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