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Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field (2004)

Chapter: Appendix: Agenda of July 25-26, 2001, Symposium

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda of July 25-26, 2001, Symposium." National Research Council. 2004. Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11106.
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Appendix
Agenda of July 25-26, 2001, Symposium

WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 2001

1:30 p.m.

Opening Remarks

Mary Shaw, Carnegie Mellon University, and Chair, Committee on the Fundamentals of Computer Science

1:45 - 3:15

Session 1: Impacts of Computer Science

Edward L. Ayers, University of Virginia—Understanding the Past as Information

Susan Landau, Sun Microsystems—The Profound Effect of CS on the Practice and Teaching of Mathematics

Michael Lesk, National Science Foundation—Computer Science Is to Information as Chemistry Is to Matter

3:15 - 3:30

Break

3:30 - 4:00

Guest Speaker

William A. Wulf, National Academy of Engineering—The Engineering and Science Fundamentals of Computer Science

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda of July 25-26, 2001, Symposium." National Research Council. 2004. Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11106.
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4:00 - 5:30

Session 2: Sampling of Hard Research Questions in Computer Science

Sriram Rajamani, Microsoft Research—Specifying and Checking Properties of Programs

Lillian Lee, Cornell University—“I’m Sorry Dave, I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That”: Linguistics, Statistics, and Natural Language Processing in 2001

Chee Yap, New York University—Toward Robust Geometric Computation

5:30

Reception

6:30 p.m.

Dinner

THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2001

7:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

8:30 - 10:30

Session 3: CS Research: Content and Character

Ursula Martin, University of St. Andrews—What Is Computer Science?—The European Perspective

Neil Immerman, University of Massachusetts, Amherst—On the Unusual Effectiveness of Logic in Computer Science

Amy Bruckman, Georgia Institute of Technology—Synergies Between Educational Theory and Computer Science

Gerald Sussman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology—The Legacy of Computer Science

10:30 - 10:45

Break

10:45 - 12:00

Wrap-up Discussion—What Makes Computer Science Vital and Exciting?

All-participant discussion, moderated by Jim Foley, Georgia Institute of Technology

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda of July 25-26, 2001, Symposium." National Research Council. 2004. Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11106.
×
Page 193
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda of July 25-26, 2001, Symposium." National Research Council. 2004. Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11106.
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Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field provides a concise characterization of key ideas that lie at the core of computer science (CS) research. The book offers a description of CS research recognizing the richness and diversity of the field. It brings together two dozen essays on diverse aspects of CS research, their motivation and results. By describing in accessible form computer science’s intellectual character, and by conveying a sense of its vibrancy through a set of examples, the book aims to prepare readers for what the future might hold and help to inspire CS researchers in its creation.

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