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Regional Cooperation for Water Quality Improvement in Southwestern Pennsylvania (2005)

Chapter: Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Regional Cooperation for Water Quality Improvement in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11196.
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Appendix E
Committee and Staff Biographical Information

Jerome B. Gilbert (NAE), Chair, is a consulting professional engineer who provides policy and technical advice on water and wastewater management, water transfers and rights, and regulatory compliance. Mr. Gilbert was general manager and chief engineer (1981-1991) for the East Bay Municipal Utility District in the Oakland, California region and served as president of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers (1991-1992) and the American Water Works Association (1979-1980). He served on the Executive Committee of the International Water Association from 1998 to 2004. Mr. Gilbert was a founding member of the National Research Council (NRC) Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB; 1982-1986) and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He served on several NRC committees, most recently the Committee on Privatization of Water Services in the United States. Mr. Gilbert holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Cincinnati and Stanford University, respectively.

Brian J. Hill was senior vice president for watersheds for the Pennsylvania Environmental Council (PEC) and also served as director for the PEC French Creek Project based in Meadville, Pennsylvania prior to accepting a position in May 2004 in the Policy Office of the Governor in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and resigning from the committee. The purpose of the project and the council's overall watershed protection program is to spur grassroots efforts to reduce point and nonpoint source water pollution. Previously Mr. Hill served as director of the Western Pennsylvania Office of the PEC in Pittsburgh for six years; he has developed a wide variety of environmental educational programs including workshops and seminars on solid and hazardous waste management, the reuse of industrial sites, and land use policy in Pennsylvania. Mr. Hill is a past chairman of the Citizens Advisory Council to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) and has served as a member of the PADEP’s Environmental Quality Board. He received his B.S. in environmental science from Allegheny College and his M.S. in natural resource management from the University of New Hampshire.

Jeffrey M. Lauria is a vice president of Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., a century-old New York-based firm of civil and environmental engineers and scientists specializing in water issues. In this position, Dr. Lauria directs large-scale program management and engineering master plans for wastewater, wet weather, watershed, and water quality projects. He also has comprehensive national and international experience in wastewater, drinking water, and stormwater treatment processes and related expertise in hydraulic, hydrologic, water quality, and mathematical modeling to support decision optimization at more than 200 project locations. Dr. Lauria has also served as a technical adviser to several state and local governments and on scientific and managerial councils from the private sector. He received a B.E. in civil engineering from Manhattan College, and an M.E. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Manhattan College and Polytechnic University, respectively.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Regional Cooperation for Water Quality Improvement in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11196.
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Gary S. Logsdon recently retired as a senior consultant for Black & Veatch Corporation, a worldwide engineering, consulting, and construction company based in Kansas City, Missouri. Previously, Dr. Logsdon served for more than 25 years with the U.S. Public Health Service and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). At Black & Veatch, he provided oversight for studies of drinking water treatment and worked with water utilities to optimize their operations. Dr. Logsdon has a wide range of experience in water treatment technology development and application; he has conducted research on water filtration for removal of waterborne intestinal parasite cysts, bacteria, and turbidity and on the modification of water quality for corrosion control in water distribution systems. He is a former WSTB member and served on the NRC Committee on Small Water Supply Systems. Dr. Logsdon received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil and sanitary engineering from the University of Missouri at Columbia, and a D.Sc. in environmental engineering from Washington University.

Perry L. McCarty (NAE) is Silas H. Palmer Professor Emeritus in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. Dr. McCarty’s research interests include aerobic and anaerobic biological processes for water quality control, advanced wastewater treatment processes, and movement, fate, and control of hazardous chemicals in groundwater. Dr. McCarty is a member of the NAE, and has served on many NAE and NRC panels, committees, boards, and commissions. Dr. McCarty received his B.S. degree from Wayne State University and his M.S. and Sc.D. degrees in sanitary engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Patricia Miller is a senior training coordinator and hydrogeologist at Tetra Tech, Inc., in Cincinnati, Ohio. She previously worked as an extension specialist at Michigan State University and, until recently, at West Virginia University. Her earlier work experience with the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation and the Virginia Department of Health involved watershed, total maximum daily load (TMDL), and decentralized wastewater programs. Dr. Miller’s research and extension activities include environmental health, drinking water, and surface and groundwater protection, especially as related to septic systems and other on-site and small community wastewater treatment systems. She received her B.S. in geology from Tulane University, her M.S. in geology and mineralogy from Ohio State University, and her Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Texas at Dallas.

David H. Moreau is professor and prior chair of the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Moreau’s research interests include analysis, planning, financing, and evaluation of water resources and related environmental programs and he is actively involved in water resources planning at the local, state, and federal levels. He has chaired or served on several NRC committees, most recently as a member of the Panel on Peer Review of the Committee to Assess the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Methods of Analysis and Peer Review for Water Resources Project Planning. Dr. Moreau serves as chairman of the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission, the state’s regulatory commission for water quality, air quality, and water allocation. Dr. Moreau received a B.S. and M.S. in civil engineering from Mississippi State University and North Carolina State University, respectively, and a Ph.D. in water resources from Harvard University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Regional Cooperation for Water Quality Improvement in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11196.
×

Nelson P. Moyer is a senior scientist with the Cadmus Group, Inc., and he holds an adjunct professor appointment in the University of Iowa College of Public Health. He is a diplomate of the Board of Medical and Molecular Biology with certification in medical and public health microbiology. Prior to joining the Cadmus Group, Inc., in August 2002, Dr. Moyer served for 28 years as chief microbiologist in the State Public Health Laboratories in Oklahoma and Iowa. His research interests include molecular epidemiology, application of indicator organisms to pollution monitoring, and bacterial colonization of potable water systems. He has served on numerous advisory committees supporting the EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the American Water Works Association Research Foundation, and the Public Health Foundation. Dr. Moyer received his B.S. degree in bacteriology-chemistry from the Florida State University, and his Ph.D. degree in microbiology-biochemistry from the Louisiana State University.

Rutherford H. Platt is a professor of geography and planning law at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Dr. Platt specializes in federal, state, and regional policies concerning land and water resource management and natural disasters. Among many books and other publications, he is the author of Land Use and Society: Geography, Law, and Public Policy—Revised Edition published in 2004. He is director of the Ecological Cities Project based at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, to share experience and research on the protection, restoration, and management of urban greenspaces across the United States and elsewhere. Dr. Platt is the past chair of the NRC Roundtable on Natural Disasters and a former member of the WSTB. He has previously served on eight committees of the NRC, twice as chair, and was recently appointed a national associate of the National Academies. He received a B.S. in political science from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Chicago; he and holds a J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School.

Stuart S. Schwartz is director of the Center for Environmental Science, Technology, and Policy at Cleveland State University (CSU). Before joining CSU, Dr. Schwartz served as associate director of the Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina. Previously, Dr. Schwartz served as an associate hydrologic engineer at the Hydrologic Research Center in San Diego, California, and directed the Section for Cooperative Water Supply Operations on the Potomac at the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. Dr. Schwartz’s research and professional interests are in the application of probabilistic hydrologic forecasting and multiobjective decision making in risk-based water resources management, watershed management, and water supply systems operations. He currently serves on the NRC Committee on USGS Water Resources Research. He received his B.S. and M.S. in biology-geology from the University of Rochester and his Ph.D. in systems analysis from the Johns Hopkins University.

James S. Shortle is distinguished professor of agricultural and environmental economics in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology at Pennsylvania State University. His recent work focuses on the design of incentive-based approaches for reducing pollution from agriculture and other nonpoint pollution sources; measuring and predicting relationships between the environment and the economy; integrating economic and environmental information for water quality decision making; and decision making to mitigate impacts of climate change. Dr. Shortle received a B.S. and M.A. in economics from the University of New Mexico and a Ph.D. in economics from Iowa State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Regional Cooperation for Water Quality Improvement in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11196.
×

Joel A. Tarr is the Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. His research areas include the history of the urban environment and of urban technological systems. One of his specialties is the history of the Pittsburgh region, and in 2003 his book Devastation and Renewal: An Environmental History of Pittsburgh and Its Region was published. Dr. Tarr served previously on two NRC committees, most recently the Committee on International Comparison of National Policies and Expectations Affecting Public Transit. He received his B.S. and M.A. degrees from Rutgers University and his Ph.D. in American history from Northwestern University.

Jeanne M. VanBriesen is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. Her primary research interests are in biological processes in aquatic environmental systems, including biological treatment processes for wastewater and drinking water and microbiological stability in drinking water. She also conducts research in bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds, modeling environmental systems involving complex biogeochemistry, and treatment and remediation of mixed wastes in aquatic surface and subsurface systems. Dr. VanBriesen received a B.S. in education (chemistry) and an M.S. and Ph.D. in civil (environmental) engineering from Northwestern University.

Paul F. Ziemkiewicz is director of the National Mine Land Reclamation Center at West Virginia University and the West Virginia Water Research Institute. Dr. Ziemkiewicz is also a research professor in the Division of Plant and Soil Sciences at West Virginia University. His current research focuses on acid mine drainage, land reclamation, coal combustion by-products, and water quality impacts relating to the coal industry. In addition to his research activities, he currently serves on both state and federal policy advisory committees focusing on reclamation and acid mine drainage. Dr. Ziemkiewicz received his B.S. in biology and M.S. in range ecology from Utah State University and his Ph.D. in forest ecology from the University of British Columbia.

STAFF

Mark C. Gibson is a senior program officer at the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board and was responsible for the completion of this report. Since joining the NRC in 1998, he has served as study director for six committees, including the Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants that released three reports, the Committee on Assessing and Valuing the Services of Aquatic and Related Terrestrial Ecosystems, and the Committee on Indicators for Waterborne Pathogens. Mr. Gibson received his B.S. in biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and his M.S. in environmental science and policy in biology from George Mason University.

Dorothy K. Weir is a senior program assistant with the Water Science and Technology Board. She received a B.S. in biology from Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee and an M.S. degree in environmental science and policy from Johns Hopkins University. Ms. Weir joined the NRC in 2003.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Regional Cooperation for Water Quality Improvement in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11196.
×
Page 279
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Regional Cooperation for Water Quality Improvement in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11196.
×
Page 280
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Regional Cooperation for Water Quality Improvement in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11196.
×
Page 281
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Regional Cooperation for Water Quality Improvement in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11196.
×
Page 282
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The city of Pittsburgh and surrounding area of southwestern Pennsylvania face complex water quality problems, due in large part to aging wastewater infrastructures that cannot handle sewer overflows and stormwater runoff, especially during wet weather. Other problems such as acid mine drainage are a legacy of the region’s past coal mining, heavy industry, and manufacturing economy. Currently, water planning and management in southwestern Pennsylvania is highly fragmented; federal and state governments, 11 counties, hundreds of municipalities, and other entities all play roles, but with little coordination or cooperation. The report finds that a comprehensive, watershed-based approach is needed to effectively meet water quality standards throughout the region in the most cost-effective manner. The report outlines both technical and institutional alternatives to consider in the development and implementation of such an approach.

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