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Review of Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods (2006)

Chapter: Appendix D: Acronyms

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Research Council. 2006. Review of Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11616.
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Page 185
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Research Council. 2006. Review of Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11616.
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Page 186
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Research Council. 2006. Review of Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11616.
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Page 187
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Research Council. 2006. Review of Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11616.
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Page 188

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Appendix D Acronyms ACCSP Atlantic Coast Cooperative Statistics Program ASA American Statistical Association ASAP age-structured analysis program ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BRD bycatch reduction device CCS Catch Card Survey CPFV commercial passenger fishing vessel CPUE catch per unit effort CRFS California Recreational Fisheries Survey DAMARS Designs and Models for Aquatic Resource Surveys EIA Energy Information Administration EPA Environmental Protection Agency FHS For-Hire Survey ft feet GIS Geographic Information System GMFMC Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council GPS Global Positioning System HPUE harvest per unit effort 185

186 APPENDIX D IMPLAN Impact Analysis for Planning Model in inch IRG independent research group kg kilogram lbs pounds LPS Large Pelagic Survey m meter MMS Methodology, Measurement, and Statistics Program MRFSS Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey MSE mean square error mt metric ton NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NMFS National Marine Fisheries Service NRC National Research Council NRCS National Resources Conservation Service NRI National Resources Inventory NSF National Science Foundation ORBS Oregon Recreational Boat Survey OSP Ocean Sampling Program OY optimum yield PacFIN Pacific Coast Fisheries Information Network PCS Party Charter Survey PFMC Pacific Fishery Management Council PSMFC Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission PSSP Puget Sound Sampling Program RDD random digit dialing RecFIN Recreational Fisheries Information Network RTC Recreational Technical Committee SEAMAP Spatial Ecological Analysis of Megavertebrate Popula- tions SEBS Shore and Estuary Boat Survey SEDAR Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review SEFSC Southeast Fisheries Science Center

APPENDIX D 187 STAR Science and Technology to Achieve Results STAR Panel Stock Assessment Review Panel STARMAP Space-Time Aquatic Resources Modeling and Analysis Program SWHS Sport Fish Statewide Harvest Survey TED turtle exclusion device TIP trip interview program TPWD Texas Parks and Wildlife Department VPA Virtual Population Analysis VDTS Vessel Directory Telephone Survey VTR Vessel Trip Report WDFW Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

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Recreational fishing in the United States is an important social and economic component of many marine fisheries, with an estimated 14 million anglers making almost 82 million fishing trips in 2004. Although each individual angler typically harvests a small number of fish, collectively these sport fisheries can take a significant fraction of the yearly catch--in some cases more than commercial fisheries. For example, in 1999, recreational fishing accounted for 94% of the total catch of spotted sea trout, 76% of striped bass and sheephead, and 60 percent of king mackerel. It is important that systems used to monitor fishing catch are adequate for timely management of recreational fisheries. However, the large number of anglers and access points makes monitoring recreational fishing much more difficult than monitoring commercial fishing. This report reviews the types of survey methods used to estimate catch in recreational fisheries, including state/federal cooperative programs. The report finds that both telephone survey and onsite access components of the current monitoring systems have serious flaws in design or implementation. There are also several areas of miscommunication and mismatched criteria among designers of surveys, data collectors, and recreational fisheries. The report recommends that a comprehensive, universal sampling frame with national coverage should be established, and that improvements should be made in statistical analysis of the data collected and in the ways the data are communicated. A permanent and independent research group should be established and funded to evaluate the statistical design and adequacy of recreational fishery surveys and to guide necessary modifications or new initiatives.

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