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Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management (2007)

Chapter: Appendix D Workshop Agenda and Participants

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2007. Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11793.
×

Appendix D
Workshop Agenda and Participants

WORKSHOP ON GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION FOR DISASTER MANAGEMENT

Agenda

Wednesday, October 5, 2006

8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

9:00

Welcome (Goodchild)

PANEL 1: User Needs: Requirements and Gaps

9:10

Introduction (Donahue, Bruzewicz)

9:15

Panelist Remarks

Questions by Committee

Open Discussion

10:35

Summary of Discussion (Donahue, Bruzewicz)

10:40

Break

PANEL 2: Data and Tools: Requirements and Gaps

11:00

Introduction (Goodchild, Cutter)

11:05

Panelist Remarks

Questions by Committee

Open Discussion

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2007. Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11793.
×

12:25 p.m.

Summary of Discussion (Goodchild, Cutter)

12:30-1:30

Lunch

PANEL 3: Interoperability

1:30

Introduction (Moeller, Hu, Reed, Klavans)

1:35

Panelist Remarks

Questions by Committee

Open Discussion

2:55

Summary of Discussion (Moeller, Hu, Reed, Klavans)

3:00

Break

BREAKOUT SESSION

3:30-5:00

1—Members Room

2—Room 142

3—Room 146

PLENARY SESSION

5:00

Summary of Breakout Sessions

5:30

Adjourn

5:30

Reception in Great Hall

Thursday, October 6, 2006

Venue: Members Room

8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

PANEL 4: Training

9:00

Introduction (Stanley, Cutter)

9:05

Panelist Remarks

Questions by Committee

Open Discussion

10:25

Summary of Discussion (Stanley, Cutter)

10:30

Break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2007. Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11793.
×

PANEL 5: Data Accessibility and Security

11:00

Introduction (Gomez, Monmonier, Oswald)

11:05

Panelist Remarks

Questions by Committee

Open Discussion

12:25 p.m.

Summary of Discussion (Gomez, Monmonier, Oswald)

12:30

Lunch

BREAKOUT SESSION

1:30-3:00

1—Members Room

2—Room 142

3—Room 146

3:00

Break

PLENARY SESSION

3:30

Reports from Breakout Session

4:00

Wrap-up of Workshop

4:30

Adjourn

Session Panel Members and Chairs
Session 1: User Needs: Requirements and Gaps

Amy Donahue, University of Connecticut (co-chair)

Andy Bruzewicz, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (co-chair)

Jim McConnell, New York City Office of Emergency Management

Michael Payne, Pierce County, Washington

Suha Ulgen, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

Bruce Davis, Department of Homeland Security

Session 2: Data and Tools: Requirements and Gaps

Mike Goodchild, University of California, Santa Barbara (co-chair)

Susan Cutter, University of South Carolina (co-chair)

Paul Densham, University College London (co-chair)

Michael Hodgson, University of South Carolina

Tim Johnson, North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis

Bob Chen, Columbia University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2007. Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11793.
×

Stephen Smith, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Earnie Paylor, WorldTech Inc.

John Perry, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Charles Huyck, ImageCat

Session 3: Interoperability

John Moeller, Northrup Grumman TASC (co-chair)

Pat Hu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (co-chair)

Judith Klavans, University of Maryland (co-chair)

Carl Reed, Open Geospatial Consortium (co-chair)

Judith Woodhall, COMCARE

Craig Stewart, GeoConnections Secretariat, Natural Resources Canada

Tom Merkle, Capital Wireless Integrated Network

Tony Spicci, Missouri Department of Conservation

John Contestabile, Maryland Department of Transportation

Eric Anderson, City of Tacoma, Washington

Session 4: Training

Ellis Stanley, Los Angeles Emergency Preparedness Department (co-chair)

Susan Cutter, University of South Carolina (co-chair)

Sue Kalweit, Booz Allen Hamilton

David McEntire, University of North Texas

Robert Slusar, Northrup Grumman IT TASC

Ron Wilson, National Institute of Justice

John Hwang, California State University, Long Beach

Session 5: Data Accessibility and Security

Pete Gomez, Xcel Energy (co-chair)

Mark Monmonier, Syracuse University (co-chair)

Bruce Oswald, New York State (retired) (co-chair)

Don Welsh, New York State Office of Cyber Security and Critical Infrastructure Coordination

Peter Gomez, Xcel Energy

Beth Lachman, Rand Corporation

Harlan Onsrud, University of Maine

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2007. Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11793.
×
Page 173
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2007. Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11793.
×
Page 174
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2007. Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11793.
×
Page 175
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Workshop Agenda and Participants." National Research Council. 2007. Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11793.
×
Page 176
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In the past few years the United States has experienced a series of disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005, which have severely taxed and in many cases overwhelmed responding agencies. In all aspects of emergency management, geospatial data and tools have the potential to help save lives, limit damage, and reduce the costs of dealing with emergencies. Great strides have been made in the past four decades in the development of geospatial data and tools that describe locations of objects on the Earth's surface and make it possible for anyone with access to the Internet to witness the magnitude of a disaster. However, the effectiveness of any technology is as much about the human systems in which it is embedded as about the technology itself.

Successful Response Starts with a Map assesses the status of the use of geospatial data, tools, and infrastructure in disaster management, and recommends ways to increase and improve their use. This book explores emergency planning and response; how geospatial data and tools are currently being used in this field; the current policies that govern their use; various issues related to data accessibility and security; training; and funding. Successful Response Starts with a Map recommends significant investments be made in training of personnel, coordination among agencies, sharing of data and tools, planning and preparedness, and the tools themselves.

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