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Technology, Policy, Law, and Ethics Regarding U.S. Acquisition and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities (2009)

Chapter: Appendix B: Meeting Participants and Other Contributors

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Participants and Other Contributors." National Research Council. 2009. Technology, Policy, Law, and Ethics Regarding U.S. Acquisition and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12651.
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Page 348
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Participants and Other Contributors." National Research Council. 2009. Technology, Policy, Law, and Ethics Regarding U.S. Acquisition and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12651.
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Page 349

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Appendix B Meeting Participants and Other Contributors The Committee on Offensive Information Warfare held five open meetings starting in June 2006. These meetings included information- gathering sessions open to the public, as well as closed segments for committee deliberation. The committee heard from numerous presenters at these meetings, including the following. Meeting 1, June 26-27, 2006 Thomas Wingfield, Potomac Institute Rod Wallace, Nortel Steven Bellovin, Columbia University Meeting 2, October 30-31, 2006 K.A. Taipale, Center for Advanced Studies in Science and Technology Policy Stuart Starr, Center for Technology and National Security Policy, National Defense University William Howard, Independent Consultant Linton Wells, Department of Defense Thomas Schelling, University of Maryland (videotaped) LTC Eric Jensen, Office of the Judge Advocate General, U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Bill Donahue, U.S. Air Force (retired) Joe Dhillon, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law 348

APPENDIX B 349 Neal Pollard, Georgetown University and NCTC Admiral Elizabeth Hight, Joint Task Force on Global Network Operations Jeff McMahan, Rutgers University Father J. Bryan Hehir, Harvard University/Catholic Charities Fact-gathering session, January 27, 2007 Forrest Hare, U.S. Air Force Meeting 3, February 20-21, 2007 Sam Gardiner, U.S. Air Force (retired) James N. Miller, Jr., Hicks and Associates, Inc. Dorothy E. Denning, Naval Postgraduate School Dan Kuehl, National Defense University Jeff Smith, former CIA General Counsel Fact-gathering session, MARCH 28, 2007 Stephen A. Cambone, former Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence Meeting 4, April 10-11, 2007 Patrick D. Allen, General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems David Koplow, Georgetown University Milo Medin, M2Z Networks Jeffrey I. Schiller, MIT Jim Dempsey, Center for Democracy and Technology Richard Salgado, Yahoo! Eugene Volokh, UCLA School of Law Robert Weisberg, Stanford Law School Helen Stacy, Stanford University Naveen Jain, Intelius

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The United States is increasingly dependent on information and information technology for both civilian and military purposes, as are many other nations. Although there is a substantial literature on the potential impact of a cyberattack on the societal infrastructure of the United States, little has been written about the use of cyberattack as an instrument of U.S. policy.

Cyberattacks--actions intended to damage adversary computer systems or networks--can be used for a variety of military purposes. But they also have application to certain missions of the intelligence community, such as covert action. They may be useful for certain domestic law enforcement purposes, and some analysts believe that they might be useful for certain private sector entities who are themselves under cyberattack. This report considers all of these applications from an integrated perspective that ties together technology, policy, legal, and ethical issues.

Focusing on the use of cyberattack as an instrument of U.S. national policy, Technology, Policy, Law and Ethics Regarding U.S. Acquisition and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities explores important characteristics of cyberattack. It describes the current international and domestic legal structure as it might apply to cyberattack, and considers analogies to other domains of conflict to develop relevant insights. Of special interest to the military, intelligence, law enforcement, and homeland security communities, this report is also an essential point of departure for nongovernmental researchers interested in this rarely discussed topic.

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