National Academies Press: OpenBook

Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research: A Workshop Summary (2012)

Chapter: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda

« Previous: REFERENCES
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13307.
×

A

Workshop Agenda

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

20 F St NW Conference Center

Washington, DC 20001

 

8:30–8:35 Introduction

Nancy E. Adler, Ph.D.; Lisa and John Pritzker Professor of Psychology, University of California, San Francisco; and Chair, Workshop Planning Committee

 

8:35–8:45 Opening Remarks—Office of Research on Women’s Health

Janine A. Clayton, M.D.; Deputy Director, Office of Research on Women’s Health, National Institutes of Health

 

8:45–9:30 Session 1—Why Sex-Specific Reporting Is Important

Session Moderator:

Nancy E. Adler, Ph.D.

Panelists:

Jesse Berlin, Sc.D., Vice President, Epidemiology, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13307.
×

 

Carolyn M. Clancy, M.D.; Director, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Martha Nolan, J.D.; Vice President, Public Policy, Society for Women’s Health Research

Ameeta Parekh, Ph.D.; Director, Research and Development, Office of Women’s Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

 

9:30–11:00 Session 2—Sex-Specific Reporting Policies: Implications for Researchers

Session Moderator:

Jon E. Levine, Ph.D.; Director, Wisconsin National Primate Research Center; Professor, Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin–Madison; Editor-in-Chief, Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology; Member, Advisory Committee, Office of Research on Women’s Health; and Member, IOM Workshop Planning Committee

Panelists:

Larry Cahill, Ph.D.; Professor, Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California, Irvine

Denise L. Faustman, M.D., Ph.D.; Director, Immunobiology Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital; Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School

Judith H. Lichtman, M.P.H., M.Sc., Ph.D.; Associate Professor, Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine

Rae Silver, Ph.D.; Helene L. and Mark N. Kaplan Professor of Natural and Physical Sciences, Barnard College and Columbia University

John B. Wong, M.D.; Professor of Medicine and Chief, Division of Clinical Decision Making, Informatics, and Telemedicine, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine

 

10:45–11:00  

Discussion with Audience

 

11:00–11:15 Break
   
11:15–12:30 Session 3—Experiences of Journal Editors Implementing Editorial Policies
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13307.
×

11:15–12:00

Session Moderator:

Floyd Bloom, M.D.; Professor Emeritus Molecular and Integrative Neuroscience Department; The Scripps Research Institute; Former Editor-in-Chief, Science; and Member, Workshop Planning Committee

Panelists:

Frank Davidoff, M.D., MACP; Executive Editor, Institute for Healthcare Improvement; Editor Emeritus, Annals of Internal Medicine; Interim Chief Executive Officer, Physicians for Human Rights (via telephone)

Jerome P. Kassirer, M.D.; Distinguished Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine; Visiting Professor, Department of Medicine, Stanford University; Former Editor-in-Chief, New England Journal of Medicine; and Member, Workshop Planning Committee

Barnett S. Kramer, M.D., M.P.H.; Editor-in-Chief, Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Marianne J. Legato, M.D., FACP; Founder and Director, The Partnership for Gender-Specific Medicine, Columbia University; Professor of Clinical Medicine, Columbia University; Adjunct Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; and Founding Editor, Gender Medicine

 

12:00–12:30  

Discussion with Audience (experiences of other journal editors)

 

12:30–1:30 Lunch
   
1:30–4:20 Session 4—Sex-Specific Reporting Policies: Implications for Journals

 

1:30–3:00  

Session Moderator:

Marietta Anthony, Ph.D.; Director of Women’s Health Programs, Critical Path Institute; and Member, Workshop Planning Committee

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13307.
×

 

Panelists:

Jeffrey D. Blaustein, Ph.D.; Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst; and Editor-in-Chief, Endocrinology

Gregory D. Curfman, M.D.; Executive Editor, New England Journal of Medicine

Robert M. Golub, M.D.; Deputy Editor, JAMA

Katrina L. Kelner, Ph.D.; Editor, Translational Medicine; Managing Editor, Research Journals Science Magazine (via telephone)

Christine Laine M.D., M.P.H., FACP; Clinical Associate Professor, Jefferson Medical College; Editor-in-Chief, Annals of Internal Medicine; and Senior Vice President, American College of Physicians

 

3:00–3:20 Break
   
3:20–4:20  

Discussion with Audience

Discussion Moderators:

Marietta Anthony, Ph.D.

Jerome P. Kassirer, M.D.

 

4:20 – 5:00 Reflections and Looking Forward

Session Moderator:

Nancy E. Adler, Ph.D.

 

4:20–4:30  

Janine A. Clayton, M.D.

 

4:30–5:00  

Workshop Planning Committee Members:

Marietta Anthony, Ph.D.

Floyd Bloom, M.D.

Jerome P. Kassirer, M.D.

Jon E. Levine, Ph.D.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13307.
×
Page 45
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13307.
×
Page 46
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13307.
×
Page 47
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13307.
×
Page 48
Next: Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches »
Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research: A Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $21.00 Buy Ebook | $16.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The number of women participating in clinical trials has increased during the last two decades, but women are still underrepresented in clinical trials in general. Some of the overall increase can be attributed to the greater number of women-only trials (of therapies for diseases that affect only women). Even when women are included in clinical trials, the results are often not analyzed separately by sex.

On August 30, 2011, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice hosted the workshop Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research. The workshop explored the need for sex-specific reporting of scientific results; potential barriers and unintended consequences of sex-specific reporting of scientific results; experiences of journals that have implemented sex-specific requirements, including the challenges and benefits of such editorial policies; and steps to facilitate the reporting of sex-specific results. Presenters and participants included current and former editors of scientific journals, researchers, and scientists and policymakers from government, industry, and nonprofit organizations. Presentations and discussions highlighted the importance to both women and men of having sex-specific data, the problems with sample size and financial constraints for conducting the research, the appropriateness of sex-specific analyses, and the limitations of journal policies to change experimental designs.

Sex-Specific Reporting of Scientific Research summarizes the presentations and discussions by the expert panelists during the IOM workshop. The workshop's first session focused on why sex-specific reporting is important. Panelists highlighted historical and current events that have hindered or helped to advance the study of women. In the next session, panelists in academe discussed the challenges of collecting, analyzing, and reporting sex-specific data from the researcher's perspective. That was followed by two panels of leading journal editors who shared their experiences in developing and implementing editorial policies and the implications of sex-specific reporting policies for journals.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!