National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2012. Sea-Level Rise for the Coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington: Past, Present, and Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13389.
×

Appendix G


Acronyms and Abbreviations

CGPS continuous Global Positioning System
CMIP 3 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3
CO2 carbon dioxide
CO-OPS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services
   
DCW Digital Chart of the World
DOFs degrees-of-freedom
DORIS Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite
   
ENSO El Nñno-Southern Oscillation
   
FEMA Federal Emergency Management Administration
GCM general circulation model
GIA glacial isostatic adjustment
GLIMS Global Land Ice Measurements from Space
GLM generalized linear model
GNSS Global Navigation Satellite System
GPS Global Positioning System
GRACE Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment
   
IB inverse barometer
InSAR interferometric synthetic aperture radar
IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
   
lidar light detection and ranging
   
MBT mechanical bathythermograph
MTJ Mendocino Triple Junction
   
NCEP National Centers for Environmental Prediction
NGS National Geodetic Survey
NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
NRC National Research Council
   
PDO Pacific Decadal Oscillation
PSMSL Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level
   
RMS root mean square
   
SLA sea-level anomaly
SLE sea-level equivalent
SLP sea-level pressure
SOPAC Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center
SWH significant wave height
   
USACE U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
USGS U.S. Geological Survey
   
VLM vertical land motion
   
WGI World Glacier Inventory
   
XBT expendable bathythermograph
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2012. Sea-Level Rise for the Coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington: Past, Present, and Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13389.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2012. Sea-Level Rise for the Coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington: Past, Present, and Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13389.
×
Page 201
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2012. Sea-Level Rise for the Coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington: Past, Present, and Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13389.
×
Page 202
Sea-Level Rise for the Coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington: Past, Present, and Future Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $54.00 Buy Ebook | $43.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Tide gauges show that global sea level has risen about 7 inches during the 20th century, and recent satellite data show that the rate of sea-level rise is accelerating. As Earth warms, sea levels are rising mainly because ocean water expands as it warms; and water from melting glaciers and ice sheets is flowing into the ocean. Sea-level rise poses enormous risks to the valuable infrastructure, development, and wetlands that line much of the 1,600 mile shoreline of California, Oregon, and Washington. As those states seek to incorporate projections of sea-level rise into coastal planning, they asked the National Research Council to make independent projections of sea-level rise along their coasts for the years 2030, 2050, and 2100, taking into account regional factors that affect sea level.

Sea-Level Rise for the Coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington: Past, Present, and Future explains that sea level along the U.S. west coast is affected by a number of factors. These include: climate patterns such as the El Nino, effects from the melting of modern and ancient ice sheets, and geologic processes, such as plate tectonics. Regional projections for California, Oregon, and Washington show a sharp distinction at Cape Mendocino in northern California. South of that point, sea-level rise is expected to be very close to global projections. However, projections are lower north of Cape Mendocino because the land is being pushed upward as the ocean plate moves under the continental plate along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. However, an earthquake magnitude 8 or larger, which occurs in the region every few hundred to 1,000 years, would cause the land to drop and sea level to suddenly rise.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!