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Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education (2012)

Chapter: Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
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Appendix E

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

TERESA A. SULLIVAN (Chair) was named the eighth president of the University of Virginia in January 2010. She was previously provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at the University of Michigan, where she was also professor of sociology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Earlier, she was executive vice chancellor for academic affairs for the University of Texas System, having served as vice president and graduate dean, vice provost, and chair of the sociology department at the University of Texas at Austin. She has also held faculty appointments at the University of Chicago. A member of the law school faculty at Texas in addition to the sociology department, her research focuses on labor force demography, with particular emphasis on economic marginality and consumer debt. She is author or co-author of 6 books and more than 50 scholarly articles, and her most recent work examined the question of who files for bankruptcy and why. Ms. Sullivan has served as chair of the U.S. Census Advisory Committee. She is past secretary of the American Sociological Association and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. A graduate of James Madison College at Michigan State University, Ms. Sullivan received her doctoral degree in sociology from the University of Chicago.

THOMAS R. BAILEY is the George and Abby O’Neill professor of economics and education in the Department of International and Transcultural Studies at Teachers College, Columbia University. In 1996, he established the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, which conducts qualitative and quantitative research based on fieldwork at community colleges and analysis of national- and state-level datasets. Dr. Bailey has examined the role of community colleges in promoting educational attainment of black and Hispanic students in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×

a recently completed study for the Ford Foundation. Since 1992, Dr. Bailey has also been the director of the Institute on Education and the Economy at Teachers College. He has served as a consultant to many public agencies and foundations including the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. Department of Education, the Office of Technology Assessment, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the William T. Grant Foundation, and several state and local economic development and educational agencies. Dr. Bailey holds a Ph.D. in labor economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

BARRY P. BOSWORTH is a senior fellow in the Economic Studies Program and is the Robert V. Roosa chair in international economics at the Brookings Institution. His research includes work on the determinants of economic growth in developing countries, saving, and capital formation. He was director of the President’s Council on Wage and Price Stability in 1977-1979; visiting lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley, 1974-1975; and assistant professor, Harvard University, 1969-1971. Some recent publications include The Economy of Puerto Rico: Restoring Growth, with Susan Collins and Miguel A. Soto-Class (2006); Services Productivity in the United States: New Sources of Economic Growth, with Jack Triplett (2004); “The Empirics of Growth: An Update,” Brookings Papers on Economic Activity (2003), with Susan Collins; “Increased Life Expectancy: A Global Perspective,” with Benjamin Keys, in Henry Aaron and William Schwartz (editors), Coping with Methuselah (2003); Aging Societies: The Global Dimension (1998), edited with Gary Burtless; Coming Together? Mexico-U.S. Relations (1997), edited with Susan M. Collins and Nora Lustig; and “Valuing the Renminbi,” Tokyo Club Papers (2004). He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

DAVID W. BRENEMAN is university professor and Newton and Rita Meyers professor in economics of education at the University of Virginia. He previously served (2006-2009) as director of the public policy program at the Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. From 1995 to 2007, he served as dean of the Curry School of Education. He also serves as a member of the Board of Trustees for Sweet Briar College. Dr. Breneman was visiting professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education from 1990 to 1995, where he taught graduate courses on the economics and financing of higher education, on liberal arts colleges, and on the college presidency. As a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, he conducted research for a book, Liberal Arts Colleges: Thriving, Surviving, or Endangered?, published by Brookings in 1994. From 1983 to 1989, Dr. Breneman served as president of Kalamazoo College, a liberal arts college in Michigan. Prior to that, he was a senior fellow at Brookings from 1975 to 1983, specializing in the economics of higher education and public policy toward education. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×

RONALD G. EHRENBERG is the Irving M. Ives professor of industrial and labor relations and economics at Cornell University and director of the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute. From 1995 to 1998, he served as Cornell’s vice president for Academic Programs, Planning, and Budgeting. A member of the Cornell faculty for 28 years, Dr. Ehrenberg has authored or co-authored over 120 papers and books. He is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a past president of the Society of Labor Economists. At the National Research Council, Dr. Ehrenberg has previously served on the Committee on Dimensions, Causes, and Implications of Trends in Early Career Events for Life Scientists and the Committee on Methods for Forecasting Demand and Supply of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers; he is also a member of the PGA Oversight Committee and previously served on the OSEP Advisory Committee. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Northwestern University.

PETER T. EWELL is vice president at the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) in Boulder, Colorado, a research and development center founded to improve the management effectiveness of colleges and universities. A member of the staff since 1981, Dr. Ewell’s work focuses on assessing institutional effectiveness and the outcomes of college, and involves both research and direct consulting with institutions and state systems on collecting and using assessment information in planning, evaluation, and budgeting. Dr. Ewell has authored six books and numerous articles on the topic of improving undergraduate instruction through the assessment of student outcomes. Prior to joining NCHEMS, Dr. Ewell was coordinator for long-range planning at Governors State University and was on the faculty of the University of Chicago. In addition to consulting in higher education, Dr. Ewell has been involved in program evaluation, organizational development, and strategic planning for a variety of nonprofit and arts organizations, including the National Endowment for the Arts and six state arts agencies. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from Yale University.

IRWIN FELLER is senior visiting scientist at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also emeritus professor of economics and former director and professor of economics for the Institute for Policy Research and Evaluation at Pennsylvania State University. His research interests include science and technology policy, the economics of higher education, and program evaluation. He has published widely on topics such as the influence of the Government Performance and Results Act on research, technology diffusion from university research, research performance measurement, the university role in basic research, and state and federal technology policy. He has been a consultant to the President’s Office of Science and Technology Policy; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government; the Ford Foundation; the National Science Foundation; the National Institute of Standards and Technology; the COSMOS Corporation; SRI

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×

International; the U.S. Government Accountability Office; and the U.S. Departments of Education and Energy. Dr. Feller is a member of the American Economic Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. He is currently a member of the National Research Council Committee to Review EPA’s Title 42 Hiring Authority for Highly Qualified Scientists and Engineers. Dr. Feller holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Minnesota.

BARBARA FRAUMENI is associate dean of research, chair of the Ph.D. program, and professor of public policy at the Muskie School of Public Service of the University of Southern Maine. She previously served as chief economist of the Bureau of Economic Analysis and was a research fellow of the Program on Technology and Economic Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Her areas of expertise and research interests include measurement issues and national income accounting; human and nonhuman capital, productivity, and economic growth; market and nonmarket accounts; investment in education and research and development; and measurement of highway capital stock and the real output of government by function. Dr. Fraumeni served on the National Research Council’s Panel to Study the Design of Nonmarket Accounts. She holds a B.A. from Wellesley College and a Ph.D. from Boston College.

JULIET V. GARCIA is president of the University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College, and is the first Mexican-American woman in the nation selected to lead a college or a university. She is known for her pioneering effort to design and establish a unique partnership between the pre-existing community college and the newly created University of Texas at Brownsville. Under her leadership, the newly created “community university” has grown from 7,300 to almost 14,000 students, expanded its degree offerings to multiple new associate, bachelor’s, and graduate programs, and transformed a 47-acre community college campus into a 380-acre university campus with new state-of-the-art facilities. Dr. Garcia serves on the board of directors for the Public Welfare Foundation, the Ford Foundation, Campus Compact, and the National Audubon Society. She is the former chair of the American Council on Education and the Advisory Committee to Congress on Student Financial Assistance and the former vice chair of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She holds a Ph.D. in communication and linguistics from the University of Texas at Austin.

MICHAEL HOUT is professor of sociology and demography at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Hout currently chairs the Graduate Group in Sociology and Demography and the Berkeley Population Center. He has published widely in the areas of demography, inequality, religion, social change, and quantitative methods. His honors include the Clogg Award from the Population Association of America in 1997, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×

1997, the National Academy of Sciences in 2003, and the American Philosophical Society in 2006. At the National Research Council, Dr. Hout previously served on the Committee for the Redesign of the U.S. Naturalization Tests and is currently a member of the Committee on National Statistics, the Board on Testing and Assessment, and the Committee on Incentives and Test-based Accountability. He holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Indiana University.

NATE JOHNSON is a senior consultant to HCM Strategists on higher education policy, funding, and student success issues. He has worked in education policy, planning, and institutional research at the national, state, and institutional levels. He previously served for five years as executive director of planning and analysis for the State University System of Florida in the office of the chancellor. He facilitated the first statewide strategic plan for the Board of Governors after it was created in the Florida Constitution in 2003. He also served as associate director of institutional research at the University of Florida and as a policy analyst in Florida’s nationally recognized Office of Articulation, where he helped develop policies related to inter-sector transfer, high school graduation standards, and college admissions. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Whitman College and a Ph.D. in English literature from Cornell University.

GEORGE D. KUH is chancellor’s professor emeritus of higher education and founding director of the Center for Postsecondary Research in the School of Education at Indiana University. His research interests include assessing student and institutional performance to enhance student success and to improve the quality of the undergraduate experience. Dr. Kuh founded the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) and related surveys for law students, beginning college students, and faculty along with the NSSE Institute for Effective Educational Practice. Since 1994, he has directed the College Student Experience Questionnaire Research Program. Dr. Kuh was a member of the National Research Council Panel on Student Processes and Outcomes. He holds a Ph.D. in education from the University of Iowa.

WILLIAM F. MASSY is professor emeritus of education and business administration at Stanford University. From 1995 to 2009, he was president of the Jackson Hole Higher Education Group, Inc., a specialist in the economic and leadership issues confronting today’s colleges and universities. In the 1970s and 1980s, he held senior administrative positions at Stanford University, where he pioneered the use of financial management and planning tools that have become standards in higher education. After founding the Stanford Institute for Higher Education Research in 1988, Dr. Massy’s research focused on institutional strategy, faculty roles and responsibilities, resource allocation processes, and universities as systems. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×

CAROL A. TWIGG is president and chief executive officer of the National Center for Academic Transformation in Saratoga Springs, New York, and an internationally recognized expert in using information technology to transform teaching and learning in higher education. Winner of the McGraw Prize in Education, she is former vice president of Educom (now EDUCAUSE), where she advanced the need for new models of student-centered, online teaching and learning, now commonly accepted in higher education. She also initiated the IMS Global Learning Consortium, which is establishing interoperable technical standards for online education and training. Before joining Educom, Dr. Twigg was associate vice chancellor for learning technologies for the State University of New York and held a number of senior academic administrative positions at Empire State College. She holds a Ph.D. in English literature from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

DAVID J. ZIMMERMAN is Orrin Sage professor of political economy and professor of economics at Williams College. He is also director of the Williams Project on the Economics of Higher Education and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research interests include labor economics, poverty and income distribution, and the economics of higher education. He holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, both in economics, from Princeton University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×
Page 205
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×
Page 206
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×
Page 207
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×
Page 208
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×
Page 209
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 2012. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13417.
×
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Higher education is a linchpin of the American economy and society: teaching and research at colleges and universities contribute significantly to the nation's economic activity, both directly and through their impact on future growth; federal and state governments support teaching and research with billions of taxpayers' dollars; and individuals, communities, and the nation gain from the learning and innovation that occur in higher education.

In the current environment of increasing tuition and shrinking public funds, a sense of urgency has emerged to better track the performance of colleges and universities in the hope that their costs can be contained without compromising quality or accessibility. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education presents an analytically well-defined concept of productivity in higher education and recommends empirically valid and operationally practical guidelines for measuring it. In addition to its obvious policy and research value, improved measures of productivity may generate insights that potentially lead to enhanced departmental, institutional, or system educational processes.

Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education constructs valid productivity measures to supplement the body of information used to guide resource allocation decisions at the system, state, and national levels and to assist policymakers who must assess investments in higher education against other compelling demands on scarce resources. By portraying the productive process in detail, this report will allow stakeholders to better understand the complexities of--and potential approaches to--measuring institution, system and national-level performance in higher education.

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