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Suggested Citation:"2 OPENING PLENARY." National Academy of Engineering. 2012. Colloquy on Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13502.
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2

OPENING PLENARY

Lorelle Espinosa, Director of Policy and Strategic Initiatives at the Institute for Higher Education Policy in Washington, gave the plenary speech. She explained that more research on different populations will contribute to both the translation of research into practice and to the framing of theoretical work on the intersection of race and gender. Studies on men of color1 can benefit, she said, from previous research and assessment of programmatic activities on gender that have focused on women and girls, adding that findings from prior theoretical work may be applicable to men and boys. For example, research on intersectionality2 for minority males could refer to Black Feminist Theory as it looks at gender, race, and socioeconomic status. For research on men of color, Espinosa noted that it was important to take into account where they are in terms of their institution of higher education (e.g., community colleges and minority-serving institutions). It is also important to consider the geographic location of populations of young (precollege) minority males, as there are distinct geographic differences in the largest minority populations on the east and west coasts as well as the southern borders (see Figure 1).

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1 The terms “men of color,” “minority males,” and “underrepresented minority males” are used interchangeably in this report.

2 The term intersectionality is used “to denote the various ways in which race and gender interact to shape the multiple dimensions” of an individual’s experience. The term is often used in research on African American women. The core concept of intersectionality is that one cannot understand the full impact “wholly by looking at the race or gender dimensions of those experiences separately.” Source: Kimberle Crenshaw, “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity, Politics, and Violence against Women of Color,” Stanford Law Review, Vol. 43, 1241, 1993.

Suggested Citation:"2 OPENING PLENARY." National Academy of Engineering. 2012. Colloquy on Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13502.
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image

FIGURE 1. Large metro areas with majority-minority child (under 18) populations, 2008.
SOURCE: Brookings Institution, 2010.

In response to an audience member’s question, Espinosa agreed that it was important to look at research data on minority men in a disaggregated manner and that data for any single minority group may look very different from aggregated data across groups. Disaggregating the data by populations, regions, or ethnicities is critical to identifying target populations and capturing their unique characteristics as it relates to STEM participation. To illustrate, she referred to her slides on the top BS-granting colleges for minority males in STEM in 2007 (Table 1), showing that very few schools are listed as top producers for more than one minority male population.

Suggested Citation:"2 OPENING PLENARY." National Academy of Engineering. 2012. Colloquy on Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13502.
×

TABLE 1. Top Ten BS-Granting Colleges/Universities for Minority Males in STEM, 2007

  Black Men Latino Men Native American Men Asian Pacific Islander Men
1 Southern University and A&M College University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Oklahoma State University University of California, Berkeley
2 Florida A&M University Florida International University University of Oklahoma, Norman University of California, Davis
3 North Carolina A&T State University University of Texas, El Paso Southeastern Oklahoma State University University of California, San Diego
4 University of Phoenix Universidad Politecnica de Puerto Rico Northeastern State University University of California, Irvine
5 Strayer University University of Texas, Austin North California State University, Raleigh University of California, Los Angeles
6 Alabama A&M University University of Florida University of North Carolina, Pembroke University of Texas, Austin
7 Howard University University of Texas, Pan American Arizona State University University of Washington, Seattle
8 Prairie View A&M University Texas A&M University University of Arizona San Jose State University
9 University of Florida California State Polytechnic University, Pomona East Central University California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
10 University of Maryland, Baltimore County The University of Texas, San Antonio University of Washington, Seattle University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

SOURCE: Lorelle Espinosa, Institute for Higher Education Policy, Presentation on August 9, 2010.

Suggested Citation:"2 OPENING PLENARY." National Academy of Engineering. 2012. Colloquy on Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13502.
×
Page 3
Suggested Citation:"2 OPENING PLENARY." National Academy of Engineering. 2012. Colloquy on Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13502.
×
Page 4
Suggested Citation:"2 OPENING PLENARY." National Academy of Engineering. 2012. Colloquy on Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13502.
×
Page 5
Next: 3 BREAKOUT SESSION 1: FOCUS ON RESEARCH POPULATIONS OF MINORITY MALES BY RACE AND ETHNICITY »
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On August 8-12, 2010 the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), convened the Colloquy on Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), following the release of several reports highlighting the educational challenges facing minority males. The NSF recognized the need to gather input from research communities that focus on minority males about how to frame investigations of gender-based factors that impact learning and choice in STEM education (both at the precollege and higher education levels) and the workforce for minority males. There was particular interest in framing a research agenda to study how interactions between minority males and societal and educational systems (both formal and informal) encourage or discourage the young men's interest and persistence in STEM. In addition, NSF hoped to gain community input to inform the parameters of a future NSF research program that could effectively address minority male participation in STEM. The Colloquy was held at the Mt. Washington Conference Center in Baltimore, Maryland, with approximately 40 participants, most of them researchers in education, psychology, sociology, mathematics, and physics.

Colloquy on Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics presents a summary of the Colloquy's breakout and plenary discussions, which addressed (a) research questions articulated in the breakout groups together with theories and methodologies to begin to address these questions; and (b) considerations for a potential research solicitation for the NSF, with major areas of inquiry concerning access, participation, and success for minority males in STEM.

This report reflects the views of the individuals who participated in the plenary and breakout groups. It has been reviewed in draft form by persons chosen for their diverse perspectives and expertise in accordance with procedures approved by the National Academies' Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for quality and objectivity.

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