National Academies Press: OpenBook

Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness (2013)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches

« Previous: 8 Recommendations
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×

Appendix A

Committee Biographic Sketches

Bernard M. Rosof, MD, MACP (Chair), is chairman of the Board of Directors of Huntington Hospital, which is part of the North Shore–LIJ Health System. He has been affiliated with Huntington Hospital since 1963 and has held a number of administrative positions. Dr. Rosof is also chief executive officer of the Quality in Health Care Advisory Group, LLC, and is a professor of medicine at Hofstra North Shore–LIJ School of Medicine. He is recognized for his work on issues of health quality, patient safety, clinical practice guidelines, and performance improvement. Dr. Rosof practiced internal medicine and gastroenterology for 29 years. He has served on several Institute of Medicine committees, including serving as chair of the Committee on Identifying Effective Treatments for Gulf War Veterans’ Health Problems. Dr. Rosof is a member of the Board of Directors of the National Quality Forum and has chaired committees and task forces for the State of New York, the American Medical Association, and various specialty societies. He is a master of the American College of Physicians and chair emeritus of the college’s Board of Regents. Dr. Rosof received his medical degree from the New York University School of Medicine and completed a fellowship in gastroenterology at the Yale University School of Medicine.

Diana D. Cardenas, MD, MHA, is professor and chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine of the University of Miami (UM) Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine. She is also the principal investigator of the South Florida Spinal Cord Injury Model System, an R&D project funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×

which her current research focus is musculoskeletal pain. She is also program director of the UM/Jackson Memorial Hospital Spinal Cord Injury Medicine Fellowship and chief of service of rehabilitation medicine at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Florida. She has served as chair of the Research Advisory and Advocacy Committee of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (1997–2000), a member of the Board of Directors of the American Spinal Injury Association, and chair of the National Institutes of Health National Advisory Board on Medical Rehabilitation Research (2007–2008). She has published more than 200 articles, chapters, abstracts, and books on epidemiology, clinical trials, and outcomes research related to the secondary conditions and medical complications associated with a number of disabilities, including spinal-cord injury, traumatic brain injury, chronic neuropathic pain, and nociceptive pain. In 2004, she was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM). She has served on three prior IOM committees (the Committee on Assessing Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, the Committee on Injury Prevention and Control, and the Committee on Improving the Disability Decision Process). She served on the IOM Board on Military and Veterans Health from 2006 to 2009 and for 1 more year when it became the Board on the Health of Select Populations. She maintains a clinical practice in addition to her administrative and research activities.

Frank V. deGruy III, MD, is Woodward-Chisholm Professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine of the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Dr. deGruy has also held academic appointments in the Departments of Family Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Duke University, and the College of Medicine at the University of South Alabama. He served as chair of the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Depression in Primary Care program. Dr. deGruy is past president of the Collaborative Family Healthcare Association, is chair of the Board of Directors of the Family Physicians Inquiries Network, and is the president of the North American Primary Care Research Group. He is the author of more than 100 papers, chapters, books, editorials, and reviews and has been the principal investigator on a number of research and training grants having to do with somatization, mental disorders in primary care, and primary care practice redesign. Dr. deGruy received his MD from the College of Medicine at the University of South Alabama.

Douglas A. Drossman, MD, is adjunct professor of medicine and psychiatry at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and former codirector of the UNC Center for Functional GI & Motility Disorders in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He has a longstanding interest in the evaluation of care for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders that are difficult

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×

to diagnose and treat. He began a program of research in functional GI disorders 30 years ago and has received numerous National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants in that field. He has published more than 500 books, articles, and abstracts related to the epidemiology, psychosocial, and quality-of-life assessment, design of treatment trials, and outcomes of research in GI disorders, and he was associate editor of the journal Gastroenterology and gastroenterology editor of the Merck Manual. He has served on two previous Institute of Medicine Gulf War and Health committees— the ones that produced Physiologic, Psychologic, and Psychosocial Effects of Deployment-Related Stress and Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War, Update 2009. Dr. Drossman is president of the Rome Foundation, an international organization that sets guidelines and standards for diagnosis and care of patients who have functional GI disorders, and is president of the Drossman Center for Education and Practice of Biopsychosocial Care, which develops training programs for physicians to learn communication skills to improve the patient–provider relationship. Dr. Drossman received his MD from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and fellowships in psychosomatic medicine at the University of Rochester and in gastroenterology at UNC.

Francesca C. Dwamena, MD, MS, is professor and acting chair of the Department of Medicine of Michigan State University. Dr. Dwamena also is an adjunct professor of psychiatry and an attending physician for the Michigan State University Health Team and at Sparrow Hospital. She specializes in psychosocial medicine and is coauthor of a major text on medical interviewing. Dr. Dwamena has more than 40 published works on many aspects of clinical and primary medicine, including the identification of and treatment for medically unexplained symptoms. She received her MD from Howard University College of Medicine and her MS in epidemiology and a certificate in psychosocial medicine from Michigan State University.

Javier I. Escobar, MD, MSc, is associate dean for global health and professor of psychiatry and family medicine at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He has been an active researcher in clinical psychopharmacology, psychiatry, psychiatric epidemiology, psychiatric diagnosis, cross-cultural medicine, mental disorders in primary care, and treatment of somatoform disorders. Dr. Escobar has been the principal investigator of several National Institutes of Health–funded grants in medically unexplained symptoms, mentoring of young researchers, and mental health–primary-care collaborations. He has published more than 200 scientific articles in books and journals and has served on a number of advisory committees and task forces, including those for the National Institute of Mental Health, the World Health Organization,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×

the Food and Drug Administration, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Escobar received his MD from Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia, and did his specialty training and obtained a master’s degree in psychiatry–medical genetics at the University of Minnesota.

Wayne A. Gordon, PhD, is Jack Nash Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine and vice chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He is a neuropsychologist and the director of the Mount Sinai Brain Injury Research Center. Dr. Gordon’s recent research has focused on cognitive rehabilitation and other types of behavioral interventions to improve the functioning of people who have traumatic brain injury (TBI) and on the secondary conditions that are associated with TBI. In 2009, he received the Robert L. Moody Prize for Distinguished Initiatives in Brain Injury Research and Rehabilitation. In 2010, he received the Caveness Award from the Brain Injury Association of America, and in 2011 he received the Gold Key Award from the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. He is a member of the Board of the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation and the Brain Injury Association of America. He is past president of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Dr. Gordon has published more than 125 articles and book chapters and has presented nationally and internationally on his research. He has served on peer-review panels for the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease control and Prevention, the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the Department of Defense, and the Department of Veterans Affairs. He served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on Traumatic Brain Injury. Dr. Gordon received his PhD from Yeshiva University.

Isabel V. Hoverman, MD, MACP, is an internist in private practice in Austin, Texas, with 35 years of experience. She is also an assistant professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Her career began at the Houston VA Medical Center. She has served in several leadership positions for professional organizations and has been active in quality and safety in health care at the local and national levels. She was on two previous Institute of Medicine (IOM) Gulf War and Health committees—the ones that produced Identifying Effective Treatments for Gulf War Veterans’ Health Problems and Measuring the Health of Gulf War Veterans. She has also served on three other IOM committees: the Committee on a National Center on War-Related Illness and Post-Deployment Health Issues, the Committee on the Evaluation of the Department of Veterans Affairs Uniform Case Assessment Protocol, and the Committee to Evaluate the Medicare Peer Review Organization Program Evaluation Plan. Dr. Hoverman received her MD from the Duke University Medical School.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×

Wayne Jonas, MD, DHT, FAAFP, is Samueli Institute’s president and chief executive officer. He has had a long and distinguished career as a student, practitioner, and researcher of conventional medicine and complementary and alternative medical (CAM) practices. His experience includes service as an administrator, an international conference chairman, a speaker, a panel moderator, a peer reviewer, and an author of books and scientific articles on conventional and CAM topics. He is currently associate professor of family medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and professor of family medicine at Georgetown University School of Medicine. Dr. Jonas served as the director of the Office of Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health from 1995 to 1999; before that, he was the director of the Medical Research Fellowship of the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. He served for 24 years as an Army medical officer. At Samueli Institute, he has led the development of major whole-systems evaluation programs, including Optimal Healing Environments, Total Force Fitness, and the Wellness Initiative for the Nation. His current research interests include the placebo effect, cancer, the biologic effects of low-level toxin exposures, homeopathy, spiritual healing, and the quality of research methods on outcomes. Dr. Jonas received his MD from the Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

Joanna G. Katzman, MD, MSPH, is director of the University of New Mexico (UNM) School of Medicine Pain Center and the Project ECHO tele-ECHO Chronic Pain and Headache Clinic. She is an associate professor in neurology at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine and is the deputy chief medical officer for clinical integration and ambulatory services for the UNM Health System. The UNM School of Medicine Pain Center was awarded the 2011 American Pain Society Clinical Center of Excellence. Dr. Katzman is helping the Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense in replication of ECHO throughout military patient care centers. Dr. Katzman received her MD from Yale University School of Medicine. She completed her neurology residency and fellowship training in neurorehabilitation at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center. She also holds an MS in public health.

Elaine L. Larson, RN, PhD, FAAN, CIC, is associate dean for research and a professor of pharmaceutical and therapeutic research at the Columbia University School of Nursing and a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. She is a former dean of Georgetown University School of Nursing. Dr. Larson has been a member of the Board of Directors of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has participated in numerous activities of the National Academies. She has been an editor

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×

of the American Journal of Infection Control since 1994 and has published more than 200 journal articles, 4 books, and a number of book chapters in infection prevention, epidemiology, and clinical research. Dr. Larson received her MA and PhD from the University of Washington.

Stephen Ray Mitchell, MD, is the Joseph Butenas Professor and dean of medical education at Georgetown University and has been a member of the Georgetown University Hospital faculty since 1988, also serving as program director in internal medicine and starting an innovative pediatrics residency program in conjunction with Pew Charitable Trusts and the Partnerships in Quality Education. He is an expert in the field of adult and pediatric rheumatology and is a founding Fellow of the American College of Rheumatology. In 2004, Dr. Mitchell was inducted into mastership of the American College of Physicians—the highest honor of the college, bestowed on only 600 living members of the 150,000-member organization—and he serves on the Council of Deans of the Association of American Medical Colleges. A veteran, he completed 8 years on active duty, including temporary service in the Persian Gulf with the 82nd Airborne Division before the Gulf War. He received his MD from the University of North Carolina and trained in internal medicine and pediatrics at North Carolina Memorial Hospital and completed a fellowship in rheumatology at Georgetown University and the District of Columbia VA Medical Center.

Karen A. Robinson, PhD, MSc, is an assistant professor of medicine, epidemiology, and health policy and management and a codirector of the Evidence-Based Practice Center of Johns Hopkins University. Her work has focused on evidence-based health care and health informatics. Dr. Robinson is experienced in conducting systematic reviews to assess the efficacy and effectiveness of therapies. She has led and participated in many activities supporting the Cochrane Collaboration, including being an editor for two Cochrane review groups. Dr. Robinson received her MSc in health sciences from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, and her PhD in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Kasisomayajula (Vish) Viswanath, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health; a faculty member in the Center for Community-Based Research at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and director of the Health Communication Core of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. Dr. Viswanath’s current research focuses on documenting the link between inequalities in communication and health disparities and on addressing the disparities through communication and dissemination. He is equally concerned with bridging the gap between “discovery” and “delivery” and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×

is working toward translating knowledge to influence public-health policy and practice. Dr. Viswanath was appointed chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Center for Health Marketing of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Before his current position at Harvard, Dr. Viswanath was the acting associate director of the Behavioral Research Program in the Division of Cancer Control and Populations Sciences and a senior scientist in the Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute; on the faculty of the Ohio State University School of Journalism and Communication with an adjunct appointment in the School of Public Health; and a center scholar with Ohio State University’s Center for Health Outcomes, Policy, and Evaluation Studies. Dr. Viswanath is active in many professional organizations. He has published extensively on a variety of topics spanning health communication, social epidemiology, and social and health behavior in both health and communication journals. Dr. Viswanath received his PhD from the University of Minnesota.

Lori Zoellner, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology of the University of Washington. She is director of the University of Washington’s Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress. Her research focuses on understanding biopsychosocial mechanisms that underlie the prevention of and treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder. She received her PhD in clinical psychology with a minor in behavioral neuroscience from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×

This page is blank

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×
Page 195
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×
Page 196
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×
Page 197
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×
Page 198
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×
Page 199
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×
Page 200
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×
Page 201
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographic Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13539.
×
Page 202
Next: Appendix B: Possible Factors Underlying Chronic Multisymptom Illness »
Gulf War and Health: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $49.00 Buy Ebook | $39.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Chronic multisymptom illness (CMI) is a serious condition that imposes an enormous burden of suffering on our nation's veterans. Veterans who have CMI often have physical symptoms (such as fatigue, joint and muscle pain, and gastrointestinal symptoms) and cognitive symptoms (such as memory difficulties). For the purposes of this report, the committee defined CMI as the presence of a spectrum of chronic symptoms experienced for 6 months or longer in at least two of six categories—fatigue, mood, and cognition, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and neurologic—that may overlap with but are not fully captured by known syndromes (such as CFS, fibromyalgia, and IBS) or other diagnoses. Despite considerable efforts by researchers in the United States and elsewhere, there is no consensus among physicians, researchers, and others as to the cause of CMI. There is a growing belief that no specific causal factor or agent will be identified. Many thousands of Gulf War veterans1 who have CMI live with sometimes debilitating symptoms and seek an effective way to manage their symptoms. Estimates of the numbers of 1991 Gulf War veterans who have CMI range from 175,000 to 250,000 (about 25-35% of the 1991 Gulf War veteran population), and there is evidence that CMI in 1991 Gulf War veterans may not resolve over time. Preliminary data suggest that CMI is occurring in veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars as well.

In addition to summarizing the available scientific and medical literature regarding the best treatments for chronic multisymptom illness among Gulf War veterans, Gulf War and Health: Volume 9: Treatment for Chronic Multisymptom Illness recommends how best to disseminate this information throughout the VA to improve the care and benefits provided to veterans, recommends additional scientific studies and research initiatives to resolve areas of continuing scientific uncertainty and recommends such legislative or administrative action as the IOM deems appropriate in light of the results of its review.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!