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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Energy-Efficiency Standards and Green Building Certification Systems Used by the Department of Defense for Military Construction and Major Renovations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18282.
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A

Biosketches of Committee Members

MICHAEL R. JOHNSON, Chair, is the associate vice chancellor for facilities at University of Arkansas and teaches in the Department of Civil Engineering. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2010 “for leadership and achievements in U.S. Naval construction management and projects throughout the world.” Admiral Johnson joined the university with experience as a civil engineer and with an extensive career in the U.S. military. His academic credentials include a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Colorado, a bachelor’s degree in business/economics from Chapman College, and master’s degrees in public works and civil engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. After more than 33 years of service, Admiral Johnson retired from the U.S. Navy as rear admiral in the Civil Engineer Corps in 2004. As commander of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and chief of civil engineers, he directed the worldwide operations of the Navy’s global engineering organization, managing more than 14,000 civilian and military personnel and a multi-billion-dollar budget. As chief of civil engineers, he was responsible for the community management of almost 40,000 military and civilian personnel. Admiral Johnson has held leadership positions in the Atlantic and Southwest Divisions of the Navy. He also served as director of Shore Installation Management on the staff of the commander in chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.

PAUL FISETTE is an associate dean of the College of Natural Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Previous to his current position he served as head of the Department of Environmental Conservation and as director of the Building and Construction Technology Program. He is currently a professor of building and construction technology and a professor of architecture. Mr. Fisette’s research and professional focus involve the performance of building systems, energy-efficient construction, sustainable building practices, and the performance of building materials. His primary interest is green building, which involves the sustainable integration of natural and built environments, and he has taught a variety of courses that focus on the performance of structures, materials, and construction practices. He is expert in how moisture moves and influences buildings and the health of building occupants. Mr. Fisette has authored more than 200 published works regarding building science and construction technology, including “Analysis of LEED and BREEAM Assessment Methods for Educational Institutions.” Prior to

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Energy-Efficiency Standards and Green Building Certification Systems Used by the Department of Defense for Military Construction and Major Renovations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18282.
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joining the University of Massachusetts, Mr. Fisette owned and operated a general contracting business and was senior editor with Progressive Builder Magazine, covering technical information and innovations of interest to residential building firms. He was a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE) for 6 years, served on the Committee to Evaluate the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools and the Committee to Review and Assess the Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing Program, and he currently serves on a National Academies expert panel to evaluate energy efficiency and sustainability standards used by the Department of Defense for its portfolio of 500,000 buildings and facilities. He is contributing editor with The Journal of Light Construction and a member of the National Institute of Building Science, and has served on a variety of editorial and professional advisory boards. His current projects include the performance and durability of building systems, energy-efficient construction, and sustainable development and resource efficiency.

CHRIS HENDRICKSON is the Duquesne Light Company University Professor of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and co-director of the Green Design Institute and editor-in-chief of Journal of Transportation Engineering of the American Society of Civil Engineering (ASCE). He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2011 “for leadership and contributions in transportation and green design engineering.” His research, teaching, and consulting are in the general area of engineering planning and management, including design for the environment, project management, transportation systems, finance, and computer applications. Current research projects include life-cycle assessment methods (especially based on economic input/output tables such as eiolca.net), assessment of alternative construction materials, economic and environmental implications of Ecommerce, product takeback planning, and infrastructure for alternative fuels. He has co-authored three textbooks, Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Goods and Services: An Input-Output Approach (2005), Project Management for Construction (1989), and Transportation Investment and Pricing Principles (1984), and two monographs, Knowledge Based Process Planning for Construction and Manufacturing (1989) and Concurrent Computer Integrated Building Design (1994). In addition, he has published numerous articles in the professional literature. Mr. Hendrickson is a distinguished member of ASCE, an emeritus member of the Transportation Research Board, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has been the recipient of the 2002 ASCE Turner Lecture Award, the 2002 Fenves Systems Research Award, the 1994 Frank M. Masters Transportation Engineering Award, the Outstanding Professor of the Year Award of the ASCE Pittsburgh Section (1990), the ASCE Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Award (1989), the Benjamin Richard Teare Teaching Award (1987), and a Rhodes Scholarship (1973).

ROSALIE RUEGG is the managing director of TIA Consulting, Inc., a firm that assembles, directs, and participates in research teams to conduct impact and process evaluations of science and technology investments. Ms. Ruegg has more than 35 years of evaluative experience working with scientists, engineers, and company leaders. Prior positions include serving as director of the Economic Assessment Office of the Advanced Technology Program; senior economist in the Applied Mathematics Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); and financial economist with the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. Her publications include a chapter in Handbook on the Theory and Practice of Program Evaluation (2012); “New Benefit-Cost Methodology for Evaluating Renewable and Energy Efficient Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy,” Environmental Economics and Investment Assessment (2010); “Tracing from Applied Research Programs to Downstream Innovations” in Research Evaluation (2011); A Toolkit for Evaluating Public R&D Investment (2003); Quantitative Methods of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Energy-Efficiency Standards and Green Building Certification Systems Used by the Department of Defense for Military Construction and Major Renovations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18282.
×

Research Evaluations Used by the US Federal Government (with D. Hicks et al., 2002); and Building Economics: Theory and Practice (1990). Ms. Ruegg has received the Department of Commerce’s medals, the Wellington Award for contributions in the field of engineering economics, the American Evaluation Association’s Outstanding Publication in Evaluation Award, and he was named Distinguished Alumnus of NIST. She holds degrees in economics from the University of North Carolina (B.A., with honors) and the University of Maryland (M.A., Woodrow Wilson Fellow), an M.B.A. (specialty in finance) from American University, a professional certification from Georgetown University, and executive training from the U.S. Federal Executive Institute and Harvard University.

MAXINE L. SAVITZ is the retired general manager of Technology Partnerships, Honeywell, Inc. She has managed large research and development (R&D) programs in the federal government and in the private sector. Some of the positions that she has held include the following: chief, Buildings Conservation Policy Research, Federal Energy Administration; professional manager, Research Applied to National Needs, National Science Foundation; division director, Buildings and Industrial Conservation, Energy Research and Development Administration; deputy assistant secretary for conservation, U.S. Department of Energy; president, Lighting Research Institute, and general manager, Ceramic Components, Allied-Signal, Inc. (now Honeywell). Dr. Savitz has extensive technical experience in the areas of materials, fuel cells, batteries and other storage devices, energy efficiency, and R&D management. She was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1992 “for technical developments contributing to national initiatives in energy conservation and energy efficiency” and currently serves as vice president of the NAE. She has been, or is serving as, a member of numerous public- and private-sector boards, including the National Science Board, the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, and the Draper Laboratory. She has served on many energy-related and other NRC committees. She has a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

THOMAS P. SEAGER is the senior sustainability scientist for the Global Institute of Sustainability and a professor and the Lincoln Fellow of Ethics and Sustainability in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment at Arizona State University. Dr. Seager conducts research related to environmental decision analysis and the life-cycle environmental impacts of alternative energy technologies. His work combines life-cycle assessment of emerging energy technologies with cutting-edge analytic tools in stochastic multi-criteria decision analysis to form a novel basis for analysis of energy issues. He is pioneering a new approach called anticipatory life-cycle assessment that combines laboratory and pilot-scale experimentation with technology forecasting to improve the developmental trajectory of novel energy technologies with respect to the environment. This approach has been applied to a permanent military base in the context of conflicting policy or stakeholder perspectives and prioritizing the need for more information and making investment decisions. Dr. Seager previously taught at the Rochester Institute of Technology and Purdue University. He earned a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from Clarkson University.

ADRIAN TULUCA is a registered architect with more than 25 years of experience in energy-efficient design, aided by modeling, testing, and monitoring. He is a principal of Viridian Energy and Environmental, a Vidaris company. Mr. Tuluca has analyzed all building types, including the more typical (offices, housing, and schools) and the less common (zoos, airports). Examples of his work include large buildings, such as the Bank of America Headquarters and Hearst Headquarters, medium ones such as several New York City schools, and small projects such as a 5,000-square-foot educational shed in a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Energy-Efficiency Standards and Green Building Certification Systems Used by the Department of Defense for Military Construction and Major Renovations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18282.
×

park. His team has performed modeling for more than 100 million square feet of facility space, from pre-design through post-occupancy, and has studied issues such as energy use, light, airflow, and thermal bridging and has performed evaluations of thermal characteristics of facades and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems. He has also led post-occupancy testing and monitoring, which help verify the effectiveness of the energy model. Mr. Tuluca has contributed to various codes and standards, including the New York State Energy Code, the New York State Green Building Tax Credit, and the ASHRAE Standard 90.1. He has studied the relationship between code compliance, LEED compliance, and actual performance of buildings. He is the lead author of Energy Efficient Design and Construction for Commercial Buildings (1997). He holds a master’s degree in architecture from Romania and an M.S. in architecture technology from Columbia University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Energy-Efficiency Standards and Green Building Certification Systems Used by the Department of Defense for Military Construction and Major Renovations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18282.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Energy-Efficiency Standards and Green Building Certification Systems Used by the Department of Defense for Military Construction and Major Renovations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18282.
×
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Energy-Efficiency Standards and Green Building Certification Systems Used by the Department of Defense for Military Construction and Major Renovations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18282.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Energy-Efficiency Standards and Green Building Certification Systems Used by the Department of Defense for Military Construction and Major Renovations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18282.
×
Page 88
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Congress has an ongoing interest in ensuring that the 500,000 buildings and other structures owned and operated by the Department of Defense (DOD) are operated effectively in terms of cost and resource use. Section 2830 of the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year requires the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional defense committees on the energy-efficiency and sustainability standards used by DOD for military construction and major renovations of buildings.

DOD's report must include a cost-benefit analysis, return on investment, and long-term payback for the building standards and green building certification systems, including:

(A) American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 189.1-2011 for the Design of High-Performance, Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential.

(B) ASHRAE Energy Standard 90.1-2010 for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential.

(C) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver, Gold, and Platinum certification for green buildings, as well as the LEED Volume certification.

(D) Other American National Standards Institute (ANSI) accredited standards.

DOD's report to the congressional defense committees must also include a copy of DOD policy prescribing a comprehensive strategy for the pursuit of design and building standards across the department that include specific energy-efficiency standards and sustainable design attributes for military construction based on the cost-benefit analysis, return on investment, and demonstrated payback required for the aforementioned building standards and green building certification systems. Energy-Efficiency Standards and Green Building Certification Systems Used by the Department of Defense for Military Construction and Major Renovations summarizes the recommendations for energy efficiency.

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