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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
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Appendix F

Committee Biosketches

Lieutenant General James B. Peake (Ret.), MD (Chair), was nominated by President George W. Bush to be Secretary of Veterans Affairs (VA) on October 30, 2007. He was unanimously confirmed by the Senate on December 14, 2007, and served from December 2007 through January 2009. Dr. Peake was the principal advocate for veterans in the US government and directed the nation’s second largest cabinet department, responsible for a nationwide system of health care services, benefits programs, and national cemeteries for America’s veterans and dependents. During his tenure, VA employed more than 280,000 people at hundreds of medical centers, nursing homes, benefits offices, and national cemeteries throughout the country. VA’s budget for fiscal year 2009 was $97.5 billion. A St. Louis, Missouri, native, Dr. Peake received his BS degree from the US Military Academy at West Point in 1966 and was commissioned as a Second :ieutenant in the US Army Infantry. Following service in Vietnam with the 101st Airborne Division, where he was awarded the Silver Star, a Bronze Star with “V” device, and the Purple Heart with oak leaf cluster, Dr. Peake entered medical school at Cornell University in New York. He was awarded a medical doctorate in 1972. Dr. Peake began his Army medical career as a general surgery resident at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. He retired from the Army in 2004, following service as a general surgeon, cardiac surgeon, and commander of several medical organizations culminating in his appointment as US Army Surgeon General from 2000 to 2004. As Army Surgeon General, Dr. Peake commanded 50,000 medical personnel and 187 Army medical facilities worldwide. Prior to that, he served as Commanding General of the US Army Medical Department Center and School, one of the largest medical training facilities in the world

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×

with more than 30,000 students annually. After retiring as a Lieutenant General, Dr. Peake served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Project Hope, a nonprofit international health foundation operating in more than 30 countries. Just prior to his nomination as VA Secretary, Dr. Peake served as Chief Operating Officer and a member of the Board of Directors for QTC, one of the largest private providers of government-outsourced occupational health and disability examination services in the nation. Dr. Peake is currently Senior Vice President at CGI Federal. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Health Threats Resilience and chaired the workshop series and report Building a Resilient Workforce: Opportunities for the Department of Homeland Security. Dr. Peake is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American College of Cardiology. He has been honored with the Order of Military Merit; the “A” Professional Designator; and the Medallion, Surgeon General, of the United States.

Dennis S. Charney, MD, is a world expert in the neurobiology and treatment of mood and anxiety disorders. He has made fundamental contributions to the understanding of the causes of human anxiety, fear, and depression and the discovery of new treatments for mood and anxiety disorders. More recently, his pioneering research has expanded to include the psychobiological mechanisms of human resilience to stress. Dr. Charney’s work in depression has led to new hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of antidepressant drugs and discovery of new and novel therapies for treatment-resistant depression, including Lithium and Ketamine. The work demonstrating that Ketamine is a rapidly acting antidepressant has been hailed as one of the most exciting developments in antidepressant therapy in more than half a century. Dr. Charney’s studies on human resilience have culminated in the identification of 10 key resilience factors for building the strength to weather and bounce back from stress and trauma. This work is summarized in an inspiring new book, Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life’s Greatest Challenges, coauthored by Steven Southwick and published by Cambridge University Press in 2012. As Dean of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Dr. Charney unveiled Mount Sinai’s $2.25 billion strategic plan, laying the foundation for the robust 15-institute structure that Mount Sinai is known for today. Today, these institutes are hubs of scientific and clinical enterprise, working together to challenge the limits of science and medicine. Mount Sinai now stands among the most innovative of the top medical

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×

schools in the United States and is a beacon for advances in education, transformative biomedical research, and personalized, compassionate, world-class clinical care. Dr. Charney’s career began in 1981 at Yale University, where, within 9 years, he rose from Assistant Professor to Professor of Psychiatry, a position he held from 1990 to 2000. While there, he chaired the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Board of Scientific Counselors, which advises the institute’s director on intramural research programs. In 2000, NIMH recruited Dr. Charney to lead the Mood and Anxiety Disorder Research Program—one of the largest programs of its kind in the world—and the Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch. That year, he was also elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. His scientific research has been honored by every major award in his field. In 2004, Mount Sinai recruited Dr. Charney as Dean of Research. In 2007, he became Dean of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs of the Medical Center. A prolific author, Dr. Charney has more than 700 publications, including groundbreaking scientific papers, chapters, and books. He has authored many books, including Neurobiology of Mental Illness (Oxford University Press, USA, Third Edition, 2009); The Peace of Mind Prescription: An Authoritative Guide to Finding the Most Effective Treatment for Anxiety and Depression (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2004); The Physicians Guide to Depression and Bipolar Disorders (McGraw-Hill Professional, 2006); Resilience and Mental Health: Challenges Across the Lifespan (Cambridge University Press, 2011); and, as mentioned, Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life’s Greatest Challenges, for lay audiences (Cambridge University Press, 2012).

Brigadier General Rhonda Cornum (Ret.), PhD, MD, recently joined TechWerks as Director of Health Strategy. She has a unique perspective, having just served as the first director of the US Army’s novel Comprehensive Soldier Fitness initiative. Recently renamed Army Comprehensive Fitness, this strategy represents the model for universal implementation of physical and psychological health promotion within the Department of Defense. Dr. Cornum previously served as the Assistant Surgeon General for Force Projection, responsible for policies and procedures to prepare soldiers and units for deployment, and commanded the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, the evacuation hub for Iraq, Afghanistan, Africa, and Europe. During this assignment, she commissioned development of the Joint Patient Tracking Application and pioneered use of the Nova

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×

Lung during critical care air transport. Dr. Cornum has written or coauthored one book, five book chapters, and numerous scientific articles. She sits on numerous committees and advisory boards, including the Secretary’s POW Advisory Committee for the Department of Veterans Affairs and the External Advisory Board for the Millennium Cohort Study, and is a Professor of Military and Emergency Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Dr. Cornum is board certified in urology, a Fellow in both the American College of Surgeons and the Aerospace Medical Association, and is a member of the American Society of Nutrition. Her decorations include the Legion of Merit (with two oak leaf clusters), Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal (with four oak leaf clusters), Purple Heart, Air Medal, and Prisoner of War Medal.

Rose K. Gantner, EdD, NCC, is the Chief Wellness Officer, Global, at HHI Healthcare Solutions and CEO at Well Works Publishing and Consulting, LLC. With 30 years of experience in wellness, health productivity, and psychology, Dr. Gantner provides a breadth of experience in designing, developing, implementing, and executing health promotion programs. She provides expertise in behavior economics and her focus has been to develop best practices supported with evidence-based research for lifestyle behavior change programs and implementation with proven measureable outcomes. Along with Gail Wagnild, PhD, Dr. Gantner has developed research-based tools such as the Culture of Resilience Audit and educational components for individuals to gauge and strengthen their resiliency in the Living a Resilient Life Model. As a Senior Engineer at HHI, Dr. Gantner also provides strategic direction to integrate the 14 health teams into 1 comprehensive system to provide a seamless experience for the member. Dr. Gantner serves as a health management consultant to state government agencies, private organizations, and commercial groups. In addition to her consulting work, she was the Senior Director–Consumer Education, Training and Innovation, and was formerly the Senior Director of Operations at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Health Plan. Prior to UPMC, Dr. Gantner worked as the Vice President of Managed Care, EAP, and Wellness at Corphealth, as a CEO for two hospitals in the Magellan Health Systems, and was founder and director of her own counseling and psychological practice. She also taught clinical psychology and health education at three different universities fulltime. Dr. Gantner served two tours in the Republic of Vietnam with the American Red Cross as the Executive Program Director for military per-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×

sonnel. She is listed in the “World’s Who’s Who” of women and served on the Health Enhancement Research Organization’s task force on leadership and incentives. In March 2012, Dr. Gantner authored a book, Workplace Wellness Performance with a Purpose, which is targeted toward health care executives and managers in the workplace. Dr. Gantner earned her undergraduate degree from Slippery Rock State University in health education, her master’s degree in health education from the University of Pittsburgh, and her doctorate in counseling psychology from Auburn University.

Ron Z. Goetzel, PhD, MA, is a Research Professor at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, Director of the Emory University Institute for Health and Productivity Studies (IHPS), and Vice President of Consulting and Applied Research for Truven Health Analytics. The mission of the IHPS is to bridge the gap between academia, the business community, and the health care policy world—bringing academic resources into policy debates and day-to-day business decisions and bringing health and productivity management issues into academia. Before moving to Emory, Dr. Goetzel was Director of the Cornell University IHPS. Dr. Goetzel is responsible for leading innovative research projects for health care purchaser, managed care, government, and pharmaceutical clients interested in conducting cutting-edge research focused on the relationship between health and well-being, medical costs, and workrelated productivity. He is a nationally recognized and widely published expert in health and productivity management, return on investment, program evaluation, and outcomes research. Dr. Goetzel is a Task Force Member of the Guide to Community Preventive Services housed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and President and CEO of The Health Project, which annually awards organizations the prestigious C. Everett Koop prize for demonstrable health improvement and cost savings from health promotion and disease prevention programs. He also worked with the Department of Defense on two health promotion and resilience training demonstrations for the US Army. Before joining Truven Health Analytics (formerly Medstat) in 1995, Dr. Goetzel was Vice President of Assessment, Data Analysis, and Evaluation Services at Johnson & Johnson. Earlier in his career, Dr. Goetzel was the Medical School Education Program Evaluator at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where he was appointed to the psychiatry faculty. Dr. Goetzel earned his doctorate in organizational and administrative studies and his

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×

MA in applied social psychology from New York University and his BS in psychology from the City College of New York.

John (Jack) Herrmann, M.S.ED., NCC, LMHC, is the Senior Advisor and Chief for Public Health Preparedness at the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO). In this role he manages NACCHO’s preparedness portfolio aimed at enhancing and strengthening the preparedness and response capacity of local health departments. He also serves as NACCHO’s chief preparedness liaison to local, state, and federal partner agencies. Prior to NACCHO, he was Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Program in Disaster Mental Health at the University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry. During his 17 years with the university, Mr. Herrmann brought a wealth of experience to the fields of disaster mental health, suicide prevention, and employee assistance program services. As the former director of the Strong Employee Assistance Program, he specialized in developing critical response teams for local police, fire, and health care organizations. He has also developed disaster mental health training curricula for behavioral health and spiritual care response teams throughout New York, Maine, Hawaii, Washington, and other communities across the United States. As a long-time volunteer with the American Red Cross, Mr. Herrmann has responded to numerous national disaster relief operations including the Northridge California Earthquake, the explosion of TWA Flight 800, and a variety of hurricanes and floods. He was assigned as the Mental Health Coordinator for the Family Assistance Center in New York City immediately following the attacks of September 11, 2001, and also assisted the New York City Mayor’s Office in coordinating the first- and second-year anniversaries of that event. In 2005, he was deployed as the Client Services Administrator for the Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita relief operations (Louisiana), coordinating the health, mental health, and client casework services for the first month following that storm. In 2006, Mr. Herrmann was assigned as the Mental Health Manager following the crash of Comair Flight 5191 in Lexington, Kentucky. His commitment to disaster mental health has been recognized nationally with many awards, including the 2001 National Disaster Services Award, the most prestigious disaster volunteer award bestowed by the American Red Cross. He also serves on many disaster preparedness committees and advisory councils and was appointed to the National Biodefense Science Board’s Disaster Mental Health subcommittee by the US Department of Health and Human Services Secretary in 2008. Mr.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×

Herrmann is currently a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events and has served on several IOM planning committees. Mr. Herrmann earned a master’s degree in education from the University of Rochester, is certified by the National Board of Certified Counselors, and is a licensed mental health counselor in the State of New York.

Richard (Rick) W. Klomp, MOB, MS, LPC, BCPC, a nehavioral scientist, leads the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Workforce and Responder Resilience Program and he is also the Deputy Director of the WorkLife Wellness Office. He has a BA degree in communications and graduate degrees in organizational behavior and community counseling. He is a board-certified licensed professional counselor who maintains a private practice and teaches a graduate-level counseling course. Mr. Klomp has worked at CDC for more than 11 years in the Office of Communications and then the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control before transferring about 5 years ago. He has been actively involved in CDC’s emergency response efforts and has deployed to the Emergency Operations Center to help with the response to the Tsunami in 2004, the outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever in Angola in 2005, and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. He also has conducted post-deployment operational debriefing interviews with more than 130 CDCers who deployed to Haiti in 2010–2011. Based on information he collected during those incidents, he reached out to colleagues at the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress and initiated a project to safeguard the health, safety, and resilience of CDC deployees. The Deployment Safety and Resiliency Team training uses psychological first aid, peer support, other relevant concepts and virtual reality environments to help prepare individuals to assess and address the physical and emotional well-being of their colleagues in the field. Mr. Klomp has co-published articles and book chapters with Dr. Dori Reissman and academic colleagues on resiliency, community resilience related to public health emergencies, and the use of virtual reality to properly prepare deployees.

Jeffrey W. Runge, MD, is currently Principal at the Chertoff Group, a firm providing business risk management and security sector advisory services, and the President of Biologue, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in biodefense, medical preparedness, and injury prevention and control. Dr. Runge is also an Adjunct Professor in the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he works on a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×

biosurveillance project sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Office of Health Affairs (OHA). From 1984 until 2001, he practiced and taught emergency medicine in North Carolina’s busiest emergency department and trauma center, while performing research in injury prevention, trauma care, and emergency service delivery. His leadership and innovation in road traffic safety brought him to Washington as the head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, where he instituted programs that led to the first absolute declines in US motor vehicle deaths in almost a decade and the lowest highway fatality rate in history. In 2005, with his government administrative experience and rich experience in emergency medical services and trauma management, Dr. Runge was appointed as DHS’s first Chief Medical Officer, in which role he led the reorganization of biodefense operations into a new OHA, where he served until 2008. OHA works across all of DHS as the principal advisor to DHS component agencies on medical, biodefense, and workforce health issues. Dr. Runge is a 1977 graduate of the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee, and received his medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina in 1981. He has been honored by both institutions in recent years as a Distinguished Alumnus. Dr. Runge is board certified in emergency medicine and has published more than 60 articles in the medical literature in the fields of emergency medicine, traffic injury control, and medical preparedness. He has testified 25 times in Congress and various state legislatures on highway safety and homeland security issues.

Kathleen M. Sutcliffe, PhD, MN, is the Gilbert and Ruth Whitaker Professor of Business Administration and Professor of Management and Organizations at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. She received a BA from the University of Michigan, a BS from the University of Alaska, an MN the University of Washington, and a PhD in management from the University of Texas at Austin. Before studying for her doctoral degree, she lived and worked in urban and rural Alaska (directing a health program for the State of Alaska and as health director for the Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Association, one of the Alaska Native Health Corporations headquartered in Anchorage). For the past decade, her research has been aimed at understanding how organizations and their members cope with uncertainty and unexpected events and how complex organizations can be designed to be more reliable and resilient. She is currently investigating these issues in wildland firefighting, health care, and other high-hazard industries. Her research has appeared in nu-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×

merous scholarly journals (e.g., Academic Medicine, Medical Care, Academy of Management Journal, Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, etc.). Two of her books include Medical Error: What Do We Know? What Do We Do? (co-authored with Marilynn Rosenthal, Jossey-Bass, 2002); Managing the Unexpected: Resilient Performance in an Age of Uncertainty, 2nd ed. (co-authored with Karl E. Weick, Jossey-Bass, 2007). A key turning point that reinvigorated research in the domain of high-reliability organizations (HROs) was Karl Weick, Kathleen Sutcliffe, and David Obstfeld’s reconceptualization of the literature on high reliability. Using a scholarship of integration, they systematically reviewed the published literature on HROs and illustrated how the infrastructure of high reliability was grounded in processes of collective mindfulness and mindful organizing, which are shaped by preoccupation with failure, reluctance to simplify interpretations, sensitivity to operations, commitment to resilience, and deference to expertise. In other words, HROs are distinctive because of their efforts to organize in ways that increase the quality of attention across the organization, thereby enhancing people’s alertness to and awareness of details so that they can detect subtle ways in which contexts vary and call for contingent responding (i.e., collective mindfulness). This construct was elaborated and refined as mindful organizing in Weick and Sutcliffe’s 2001 and 2007 editions of their book Managing the Unexpected.

Terri Tanielian, MA, is a Senior Social Research Analyst at the RAND Corporation. As the former Director of the RAND Center for Military Health Policy Research, she spent a decade overseeing RAND’s diverse military health research portfolio. She was the co–study director for a large, donor-funded assessment of the psychological, emotional, and cognitive consequences of deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan titled Invisible Wounds of War: Psychological and Cognitive Injuries, Their Consequences, and Services to Assist Recovery. She also completed a congressionally mandated evaluation of a TRICARE demonstration to expand access to mental health counselors. Ms. Tanielian’s areas of interest include psychological and behavioral effects of combat, terrorism, and disasters; public health emergency preparedness; and risk communication. She was the co–principal investigator for a study examining the US Department of Defense response to and management of three anthrax-related incidents in 2005. This work built on her earlier study of the relationship of health care decision making and perception of risk among individuals treated for anthrax exposure in fall 2001. Ms.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×

Tanielian has published numerous peer-reviewed articles. She was a member of the planning committee for the 18th, 22nd, and 26th Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposiums on Mental Health Policy, which focused on mental health needs and recovery following September 11, Hurricane Katrina, and deployment of Reserve and Guard members to Iraq and Afghanistan, respectively. Her research focus includes combat medicine, mental health and illness, military families, military health and health care, TRICARE, and veterans’ health care. Her recent projects include psychological and cognitive injuries associated with combat and deployment; access to mental health services in the military and veteran health systems; needs and well-being of service members, veterans, and their families; suicide in the military; and psychological and behavioral aspects of terrorism, disasters, and public health emergencies. Ms. Tanielian earned her BA in psychology from Boston University and her MA, also in psychology, from American University.

John M. Violanti, PhD, is a Research Professor in the Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, and a member of the University at Buffalo graduate faculty. He was formerly a full professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology Department of Criminal Justice. He is a police veteran, having served with the New York State Police for 23 years as a trooper, criminal investigator, and later as a coordinator of the Psychological Assistance Program for the State Police. Dr. Violanti has been involved in the design, implementation, and analysis of police stress and health studies during the past 25 years. Recent projects include a longitudinal study on psychological stress and cardiovascular disease in police officers and the impact of shift work on police health outcomes, funded by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. Dr. Violanti has authored more than 50 peer-reviewed articles on police stress and posttraumatic stress disorder, police mortality, and suicide. He has also written and edited 15 books on topics of police stress, psychological trauma, resilience, and suicide. He has lectured nationally and internationally at academic institutions and police agencies on matters of suicide, stress, and trauma at work. Dr. Violanti’s research has focused on a number of topics, including assessment of psychological and biological indicators of chronic police stress; subclinical cardiovascular and metabolic disease in police; shift work and health; and the epidemiology of police suicide.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F--Committee Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2013. A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18407.
×
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The responsibilities of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) range from preventing foreign and domestic terrorist attacks; securing the nation's borders; safeguarding transportation systems; responding to natural disasters; nuclear detection; and more. Created in 2002 from a merger that rapidly incorporated parts of eight cabinet departments and 22 government agencies, DHS has struggled to integrate its numerous components and their unique cultures. While DHS is very accomplished at performing its many missions, the nature of the DHS work environment is inherently stressful, and employees suffer from low morale.

A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security: Protecting America's Front Line reviews current workforce resilience efforts, identifies gaps, and provides recommendations for a 5-year strategy to improve DHSTogether, the current DHS workforce resilience program. This report stresses the importance of strong leadership, communication, measurement, and evaluation in the organization and recommends content for a 5-year plan that will promote centralized strategic direction and resource investment to improve readiness and resilience at the department.

While all DHS component agencies share a common mission, each have distinct roles with different stressors attached, making implementation of an organization-wide resilience or wellness program difficult. The recommendations of A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of Homeland Security outline how DHS can focus its efforts on creating a common culture of workforce readiness and resilience, while recognizing the distinct, proud, celebrated cultures of its component agencies.

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