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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
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Appendix C

Acronyms

AIDS acquired immune deficiency syndrome
AMD acid mine drainage
AMP antimicrobial peptide
ATP adenosine triphosphate
BAM bacteriophage adherence to mucus
CA-MRSA community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus
CBER Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research
CD Crohn’s disease
CDC U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
DOE U.S. Department of Energy
DIO diet-induced obesity
DNA deoxyribonucleic acid
FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration
FMT fecal microbiota transplantation
GE gastroesophageal
GEJ gastroesophageal junction
GI gastrointestinal
GIO gene-induced obesity
HIV human immunodeficiency virus
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
×
HMO human milk oligosaccharides
HMP Human Microbiome Project
IBD inflammatory bowel disease
iNKT invariant natural killer T
IOM Institute of Medicine
MAMP microbe-associated molecular pattern
MIO microbe-induced obesity
mRNA messenger ribonucleic acid
MRSA methicillin-resistant S. aureus
NASH nonalcoholic steatohepatitis
NIAID National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
NIH National Institutes of Health
NO nitric oxide
NSF National Science Foundation
OPC oropharyngeal candidiasis
OTU operational taxonomic unit
PAMP pathogen-associated molecular pattern
PAT pulsed antibiotic treatment
PCoA principal coordinate analysis
PCR polymerase chain reaction
POP pattern of pathogenesis
PRR pattern-recognition receptor
rDNA ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid
RNA ribonucleic acid
rRNA ribosomal ribonucleic acid
RYGB Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
SCFA short-chain fatty acid
SIV simian immunodeficiency virus
STAT subtherapeutic antibiotic treatment
TMAO trimethylamine N-oxide
VVC vulvovaginal candidiasis
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
×
Page 501
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
×
Page 502
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Individually and collectively, resident microbes play important roles in host health and survival. Shaping and shaped by their host environments, these microorganisms form intricate communities that are in a state of dynamic equilibrium. This ecologic and dynamic view of host-microbe interactions is rapidly redefining our view of health and disease. It is now accepted that the vast majority of microbes are, for the most part, not intrinsically harmful, but rather become established as persistent, co-adapted colonists in equilibrium with their environment, providing useful goods and services to their hosts while deriving benefits from these host associations. Disruption of such alliances may have consequences for host health, and investigations in a wide variety of organisms have begun to illuminate the complex and dynamic network of interaction - across the spectrum of hosts, microbes, and environmental niches - that influence the formation, function, and stability of host-associated microbial communities.

Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Microbial Threats in March 2013 to explore the scientific and therapeutic implications of microbial ecology in states of health and disease. Participants explored host-microbe interactions in humans, animals, and plants; emerging insights into how microbes may influence the development and maintenance of states of health and disease; the effects of environmental change(s) on the formation, function, and stability of microbial communities; and research challenges and opportunities for this emerging field of inquiry.

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