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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
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C

Speaker Biosketches

John M. Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., serves as senior advisor for public health at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). In this capacity he serves as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services principal to the U.S. Global Change Research Program, for which he also co-chairs the Interagency Cross-Cutting Group on Climate Change and Human Health. Dr. Balbus’ background combines training and experience in clinical medicine with expertise in epidemiology, toxicology, and risk sciences. He has authored studies and lectures on global climate change and health, transportation-related air pollution, the toxic effects of chemicals, and regulatory approaches to protecting susceptible subpopulations. Before joining NIEHS, Dr. Balbus was chief health scientist at the Environmental Defense Fund. He served on the faculty of The George Washington University, where he was founding director of the Center for Risk Science and Public Health, founding co-director of the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children’s Health and the Environment, and acting chairman of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine.

Trisha Castranio holds the position of sustainability analyst for the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Since NIEHS created the position in 2009, Ms. Castranio has been responsible for overseeing the institute’s sustainable, eco-friendly, and green business practices. She develops sustainability policies and environmental management goals for NIEHS and is responsible for evaluating the effectiveness of NIEHS’s stewardship initiatives (including promoting green chemistry and sustainable laboratories). Prior to her role as sustainability analyst, Ms. Castranio was a scientific researcher for NIEHS. In this role, she evaluated the role of environmental toxicants on early embryonic mouse development.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×

Wendy Cleland-Hamnett, J.D., is the director of the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics in the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She has served in this position since 2009 and as the deputy of the Office several years before that. As the director, Ms. Cleland-Hamnett oversees the EPA’s new and existing chemicals programs, numerous safer chemical and pollution prevention activities, enhanced efforts to make chemical information more accessible to the public, and a range of efforts to manage lead, formaldehyde, and other legacy chemicals. Ms. Cleland-Hamnett began her career at the EPA in 1979 and has worked across the agency in a number of offices and capacities, including the Office of Environmental Information, the Office of Policy, and the Administrator’s Office.

David J. C. Constable, Ph.D., is the director of the American Chemical Society’s Green Chemistry Institute®, which strives to catalyze and enable the implementation of green chemistry and engineering throughout the global chemical enterprise. From the end of September 2011 until January 2013, Dr. Constable worked as the owner and principal at Sustainability Foresights, LLC. The consultancy was directed toward assisting companies with sustainability, green chemistry, energy, environment, health, and safety programs. Prior to this, he was the corporate vice president of Energy, Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) at Lockheed Martin. In that role, he led the ESH organization, provided leadership to improve corporate-wide performance in ESH, and guided the development of Lockheed Martin positions on emerging regulatory and legislative ESH issues. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Dr. Constable was the director of Operational Sustainability in the Corporate Environment, Health, and Safety Department at GlaxoSmithKline where he led the integration of sustainability, life-cycle inventory assessment, and green technology activities into existing business processes.

Ila Cote, Ph.D., DABT, is senior science advisor in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) National Center for Environmental Assessment. This Center conducts the EPA health assessments used to support Agency decision making. She is a board-certified toxicologist and has worked in the area of environmental risk assessment and science policy for the past 25 years. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Colorado Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology and a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×

former faculty member of the New York University Medical Center’s Department of Environmental Medicine.

Joseph David is the sustainability program manager at Point32, a Seattle real estate company focused on land use, development, and construction. In this role, he is leading Point32’s efforts to secure the Living Building Challenge certification for the Bullitt Center, which is targeted to be the greenest commercial building yet constructed. He has spearheaded efforts to design a vetting process for meeting the Living Building Challenge’s strict material “red list” exclusion requirements and has quickly become an industry leader in the field. Mr. David’s prior design experience includes a performing arts theater, multi-unit affordable housing, and commercial core and shell projects. He has also worked in the renewable energy field, where he permitted and installed wind turbines throughout the Rocky Mountain west.

Connie Deford is the director of Global Product Sustainability and Compliance at the Dow Chemical Company. In this role, she is responsible for leading Dow’s global product sustainability organization and program and for development and implementation of Dow’s strategy on the Toxic Substances Control Act. This includes advocacy work within federal and state legislative and regulatory arenas and promoting Dow’s leadership in chemical management as part of Dow’s 2015 Sustainability Goals. Ms. Deford, a 29-year Dow employee, has held multiple positions within the company. Most recently, she was the director of Dow’s Global Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) Regulatory Organization where she oversaw development of Dow’s European REACH Program. For the 15 years prior, she served as a Global EH&S product leader, where she had responsibility for product regulatory compliance, product stewardship, and providing EH&S input into development of business strategies.

Richard Denison, Ph.D., is a senior scientist at the Environmental Defense Fund with 27 years of experience in the environmental arena, specializing in policy, hazard and risk assessment, and management for industrial chemicals and nanomaterials. He has testified before various congressional committees on the need for fundamental reform of U.S. policy toward industrial chemicals and on nanomaterial safety research needs. Dr. Denison is a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and its Standing

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×

Committee on Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions. He serves on the Green Ribbon Science Panel for California’s Green Chemistry Initiative. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee to Develop a Research Strategy for Environmental, Health, and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials. In addition, he was a member the Environmental Defense Fund team that worked jointly with the DuPont Corporation to develop a framework governing responsible development, production, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials.

Christina Franz, J.D., is the senior director of regulatory and technical affairs at the American Chemistry Council (ACC). She is a policy advocate on health and chemical regulatory issues affecting the ACC member companies, concentrating in particular on the Toxic Substances Control Act, the High Production Volume Program, and product stewardship issues. She earned her J.D. from Loyola University Chicago School of Law and is admitted to the bars of the state of Illinois and the District of Columbia.

Paul Gilman, Ph.D., joined Covanta in 2008 as Covanta Energy’s first senior vice president and chief sustainability officer. He is responsible for Covanta’s safety, health and environmental compliance programs, corporate communications, and sustainability initiatives that further reduce Covanta’s environmental impact while increasing the use of its technologies. Before joining Covanta, Dr. Gilman was the director of the Oak Ridge Center for Advanced Studies. He served as the assistant administrator for Research and Development and science advisor at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from 2002 until 2004. Prior to joining the EPA, he was director for Policy Planning at Celera Genomics. He was previously the executive director of life sciences and agriculture divisions of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences and Engineering. In addition, Mr. Gilman has held several senior government positions, including associate director of the White House Office of Management and Budget for Natural Resources, Energy, and Science, and executive assistant to the secretary of energy for technical matters.

Lynn R. Goldman, M.D., M.P.H., is an American public health physician, trained as a pediatrician and epidemiologist. Now Dean of the George Washington University School of Public Health, she is perhaps

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×

best known for her role in helping craft the Food Protection Act passed by Congress in 1996, the first national environmental law to explicitly require measures to protect children from pesticides. In 1993, Dr. Goldman was appointed by President Bill Clinton and confirmed by the U.S. Senate as Assistant Administrator for Toxic Substances at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), becoming the first physician to serve in this capacity. During her 5 years at the EPA, from 1993 to 1998, she promoted pesticide legislation reform, assessment of industrial-chemical hazards, and children’s health issues. Dr. Goldman is vice chair of the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine

Bernard D. Goldstein, M.D., is emeritus professor of environmental and occupational health and former dean of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. He is a physician, board certified in Internal Medicine, Hematology, and Toxicology. Dr. Goldstein is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies and of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. His experience includes service as Assistant Administrator for Research and Development of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from 1983 to 1985. In 2001 he came to the University of Pittsburgh from New Jersey where he had been the founding director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, a joint program of Rutgers University and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He has chaired more than a dozen National Research Council and the IOM committees primarily related to environmental health issues. He has been president of the Society for Risk Analysis; and has chaired the National Institutes of Health Toxicology Study Section, the EPA’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee, the National Board of Public Health Examiners, and the Research Committee of the Health Effects Institute.

William E. Halperin, Dr.P.H., M.D., M.P.H., is chair and professor of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health at the New Jersey Medical School and professor and associate dean of the Rutgers School of Public Health. Dr. Halperin worked as a physician and epidemiologist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1975 to 2000. He began as an epidemic intelligence service officer, then directed a branch responsible for preplanned large-scale epidemiologic studies of occupational exposures, and later served as deputy director for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Dr. Halperin

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×

has authored more than 125 peer-reviewed scientific articles, and other chapters and books on various aspects of public health, including occupational disease and injury, public health surveillance, periodic medical surveillance, infectious disease epidemiology, child labor, clinical preventive medicine, and other areas. Dr. Halperin serves on the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology of the National Academy of Sciences.

Liz Harriman is the deputy director of the Toxics Use Reduction Institute at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, and is responsible for managing the operations and research functions of the Institute. In her 14 years working at the Institute, she has provided technical research and support services to Massachusetts companies with the goal of identifying safer alternatives to toxic chemicals used in manufacturing and products. Her most recent work was the formation of industry supply chain workgroups to help companies comply with international regulations that restrict the use of certain chemicals, including lead and brominated flame retardants. Other technical work she has conducted includes design for the environment, chemical substitution, and analysis of industry progress in reducing waste and toxic chemical use in products.

Zephanie Jordan is vice president of Global Regulatory Affairs and Product Stewardship at Johnson & Johnson Family of Consumer Companies. In this role, she is responsible for leading the development of the global regulatory strategies for new products in the R&D pipeline across a broad portfolio of health and personal care products. She is also responsible for developing the regulatory policy agenda and leading the product stewardship initiatives and strategy as it pertains to ingredient policies as part of the broader sustainability framework. This work involves evaluating scientific, regulatory, and social trends and collaborating with stakeholders within and external to Johnson & Johnson across the globe. Ms. Jordan has worked in the consumer health care industry for more than 20 years and has been with Johnson & Johnson for almost 6 years primarily in regulatory and medical affairs leadership positions.

Richard Judson, Ph.D., works for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Center for Computational Toxicology, where he develops databases and computer applications to model and predict toxicological effects of a wide range of chemicals. He is a member of the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×

EPA ToxCast team where he leads the effort in bioinformatics. His team has developed the ACToR (Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource) database and application which compiles all publicly available data on environmental chemicals. Dr. Judson has authored research publications in areas including computational biology and chemistry, bioinformatics, genomics, human genetics, toxicology, and applied mathematics. Prior to joining the EPA, Dr. Judson was founder of GAMA BioConsulting, a bioinformatics consulting company. From 1999 to 2006, Dr. Judson was Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer with Genaissance Pharmaceuticals. Previously, he held research positions at CuraGen from 1997 to 1998 and Sandia National Laboratories from 1990 to 1996.

Frank Loy, LL.B., has served in the Department of State in four administrations. His portfolio included developing U.S. international policy and conducting negotiations in the fields of the environment and climate change, human rights, the promotion of democracy, refugees and humanitarian affairs, and counter-narcotics. In 2011 President Obama named him the U.S. Alternate Representative to the United Nations General Assembly. At present he serves on the boards of numerous nonprofit organizations. In the field of the environment these include Resources for the Future (former chair), Environmental Defense Fund (former chair), The Nature Conservancy, C2ES, and ecoAmerica (chair). He also chairs the boards of Population Services International and the Arthur Burns Fellowship Program and serves on the boards of the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies and The Washington Ballet. Mr. Loy is chair of the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine.

Canice Nolan, Ph.D., is the senior coordinator for global health for the European Commission Directorate General for Health and Consumers. In this capacity he is also the team leader for International Affairs in the Public Health Directorate. Dr. Nolan joined the European Commission in 1991 in the Directorate General for Research where he was responsible for program management on Environment, Health, and Chemical Safety. This work mainly focused on chemicals risk assessment methodologies, water quality, air pollution epidemiology, and endocrine disruption. In 1998 he moved within the Commission to the Directorate General for Agriculture where he was responsible for pesticides residues legislation. In 1999, following the reorganization of the Commission, this work moved to the Directorate General for Health and Consumers where he

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×

was head of the Plant Protection Products Sector—responsible for the management and development of legislation on pesticides evaluation, authorization, and use as well as the setting and monitoring of maximum residue limits for pesticides in food and feed. From 2004 to 2008, Dr. Nolan was head of the Health, Food Safety, and Consumer Affairs Section at the Delegation of the European Commission to the United States, based in Washington, DC.

Heather Patterson is a senior evaluator in the Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch of Health Canada. Having worked on the assessment of existing substances under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) since 1999, she has been part of many science and policy initiatives to advance the assessment and management of industrial chemicals. She has worked directly on categorization of the Canadian Domestic Substances List and contributed to numerous assessments. Her current work involves developing innovative approaches for prioritization and assessment of chemicals, including methods for rapid screening and triaging of high or low concern chemicals.

Marilee Shelton-Davenport, Ph.D., is a senior program officer with the Board on Life Sciences at the National Research Council (NRC), where she has worked on a variety of biology projects since 1999. Presently, she is director of the Standing Committee on Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions, which facilitates discussions on scientific advances for the identification, quantification, and control of environmental impacts on human health. She also directs a consensus committee on the Design and Evaluation of Safer Chemical Substitutions: A Framework to Inform Government and Industry Decisions. Before coming to the NRC, Dr. Shelton-Davenport worked at CNN as a mass media fellow of the American Association of the Advancement of Science.

Gina Solomon, M.D., M.P.H., was appointed by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. in April 2012 to serve as Deputy Secretary for Science and Health at the California Environmental Protection Agency. Prior to this, she was a senior scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council since 1996 and has been on the faculty in the Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) since 1997, where she still holds the title of clinical professor of health sciences. Dr. Soloman has served on numerous scientific committees

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×

for the State of California, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Toxicology Program, and the National Academy of Sciences. She is on the editorial board of the journal Environmental Health Perspectives and serves regularly as a peer reviewer for numerous scientific journals. Her prior work has included research on diesel exhaust and asthma, endocrine-disrupting chemicals, pesticides, environmental contaminants in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, the health implications of the 2010 Gulf oil spill, and the health effects of climate change. Dr. Soloman is board certified in both internal medicine and occupational and environmental medicine and is licensed to practice medicine in California.

Kimberly Thigpen Tart, J.D., is a program analyst in the Office of Program, Planning, and Evaluation at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Prior to this she served as news editor of the Institute’s journal, Environmental Health Perspectives, for 15 years, and on detail to the Office of the Director under Dr. Sam Wilson. Her current focus areas include issues of climate change and human health, global environmental health, prevention research, and research policy and translation. She represents the NIEHS to the National Institutes of Health Prevention Research Coordinating Committee and the U.S. Global Change Research Program and as a member of the Interagency Climate Change and Human Health Working Group.

Beverley Thorpe is the consulting co-director of communications and advocacy at Clean Production Action. She has researched and promoted clean production strategies internationally since 1986 and was a co-founder of the International Programme on Cleaner Production at the United Nations Environment Programme. She was the first clean production liaison and technical expert for Greenpeace International on chemical and waste issues. During this time, she initiated the first English language campaigns against polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic and PVC waste and helped achieve a global ban on ocean incineration of hazardous wastes. Her current focus is the promotion of green chemistry within government policy and company practices and she continues to train, teach, and publish materials that advance clean production strategies internationally. Ms. Thorpe is a current board member of the Green Chemistry Network, the Story of Stuff, and Greenpeace Canada.

Michael P. Walls, J.D., is vice president of Regulatory and Technical Affairs of the American Chemistry Council (ACC). He has been with the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×

ACC for 22 years and has experience in a wide range of U.S. domestic chemical regulatory issues, including the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA), and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). His experience also includes work on international chemical regulatory issues, including the European Commission’s regulation for Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH). Mr. Walls has represented the industry in several international chemical negotiations, and in support of U.S. ratification and implementation of those agreements. Mr. Walls began his work at the ACC in the Office of the General Counsel, where he provided legal advice on a range of international environmental and trade issues and product regulation. Before joining the ACC, Mr. Walls was in private law practice in Washington, DC, where he represented domestic chemical manufacturers.

Nsedu Obot Witherspoon, M.P.H., serves as the Executive Director for the Children’s Environmental Health Network (CEHN), where her responsibilities include successfully organizing, leading, and managing policy, education and training, and science-related programs. She is a leader in the field of children’s environmental health, serving on the Children’s Health Protection Advisory Committee for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and is a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. Ms. Witherspoon is a past member of the National Association of Environmental Health Sciences Council and past coordinator of the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences Public Interest Partners. She is a member of the Friends of the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health and a strategy advisor for the California Breast Cancer Prevention Initiatives project. Ms. Witherspoon is a long-standing leader in the Environment Section of the American Public Health Association and former executive board member for the Association.

Harold Zenick, Ph.D., is director of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory in the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Before coming to the EPA, he spent 13 years in academia with the Department of Environmental Health in the University of Cincinnati Medical School, preceded by an appointment at New Mexico Highlands University. Dr. Zenick serves on the Executive Board to the National Toxicology Program and as the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×

EPA’s liaison to the Board of Scientific Councilors for the National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. He has participated on a number of prominent national and federal work groups and currently serves as co-chair of the Toxics and Risk Subcommittee under the auspices of the Committee on Environment, Natural Resources, and Sustainability in the Office of Science, Technology, and Policy. His current interests are in integrating human health and ecological risk assessment, strengthening the linkages between environmental and public health agendas and agencies, the promotion of sustainability and sustainable problem solutions as a critical consideration in the EPA’s decision making, and the application of emerging computational, informational, and molecule sciences in improving toxicity testing and risk assessment practices.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
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Page 161
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18710.
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On November 7-8, 2013, the Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine held a workshop to discuss approaches related to identifying and reducing potential environmental public health risks to new and existing industrial chemicals present in society. Industrial chemicals include chemicals used in industrial processes or commercial products, not including those found in food, pesticides, or pharmaceuticals.

Identifying and Reducing Environmental Health Risks of Chemicals in Our Society is a summary and synthesis of the presentations and discussions that took place during the two days of the workshop. The workshop examined successes and areas for improvement within current regulatory programs for assessing industrial chemical safety, frameworks for chemical prioritization to inform targeted testing and risk management strategies, concepts of sustainability and green chemistry that support the design and use of safer alternatives, and efforts to reduce the risk of chemicals in our society.

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