National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix C: Considerations for Building a Population Health Movement: Five Key Debates
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Glossary of Movement Terminology." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×

Appendix D

Glossary of Movement Terminology

Prepared by Merlin Chowkwanyun

 

Note: Considerable disagreement exists over the exact definitions of these terms, and they should be viewed only as general and broad definitions written for non-specialists coming to the December 5, 2013, meeting from a variety of academic and practitioner backgrounds.

Campaign Although some may use “campaign” as synonymous with “social movement,” the former might be better thought of as a tool for movement participants to use. It refers to attempts, usually public, to drum up support for a cause, claim, or idea, typically those underpinning a social movement itself. These attempts usually draw on slogans, visual symbols, and political motifs and are often waged via mass media, pamphlets, and other ephemera.

Framing This term refers to the terms of debate and the parameters of discussion on which a discussion does (and does not) take place. Framing can also refer to strategic diction, choices of connotation, and special overtures to certain interest groups or specialized audiences. A conscious decision by policy makers to discuss education as a population health issue (or deciding not to do so) is an example of framing.

Grassroots Though often used loosely, this term denotes a more informal, localized, democratic, and less rigidly structured and organized approach to political mobilization and social movements. Grassroots movements often include ordinary people without professional status or direct access

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Glossary of Movement Terminology." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×

to policy makers or elected officials, and they often work outside more formal channels.

Narrative This refers to storytelling, implicit and explicit, when movement participants try to amass support. Narratives include both individual anecdotes and causal explanations of why phenomena like racial health disparities occur.

Networks The social, political, and organizational/institutional ties among people that can be mobilized in service of a social movement.

Resource mobilization An older school of social movement scholarship that analyzes how movement participants marshal and utilize economic, political, and other resources. A new generation of scholars has critiqued this approach and underscored the importance of narratives, frames, and emotional appeals, which are often as influential in determining movement momentum and ultimate success.

Social movement A collective effort, usually by groups but sometimes by coordinated individuals, to make claims on states and private entities and/or spread ideas, beliefs, or practices among a population in the hope of achieving societal change. Social movements are frequently in tension or open conflict with a status quo.

Further general reading:

 

Goodwin, J., J. Jasper, and F. Polletta. 2001. Introduction: Why emotions matter. In F. Polletta, J. M. Jasper, and J. Goodwin, eds., Passionate politics: Emotions and social movements. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. Pp. 1–26.

Orleck, A., and L. Hazirjian, eds. 2011. The war on poverty: A new grassroots history, 1964–1980. Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Polletta, F. 2008. Culture and movements. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 619(1):78–96.

Tilly, C., and L. J. Wood. 2013. Social movements, 1768–2012, 3rd ed. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Glossary of Movement Terminology." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Glossary of Movement Terminology." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×
Page 84
Next: Appendix E: Speaker and Moderator Biographies »
Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $40.00 Buy Ebook | $32.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity is the summary of a workshop convened in December 2013 by the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities and the Roundtable on Population Health Improvement to explore the lessons that may be gleaned from social movements, both those that are health-related and those that are not primarily focused on health. Participants and presenters focused on elements identified from the history and sociology of social change movements and how such elements can be applied to present-day efforts nationally and across communities to improve the chances for long, healthy lives for all.

The idea of movements and movement building is inextricably linked with the history of public health. Historically, most movements - including, for example, those for safer working conditions, for clean water, and for safe food - have emerged from the sustained efforts of many different groups of individuals, which were often organized in order to protest and advocate for changes in the name of such values as fairness and human rights. The purpose of the workshop was to have a conversation about how to support the fragments of health movements that roundtable members believed they could see occurring in society and in the health field. Recent reports from the National Academies have highlighted evidence that the United States gets poor value on its extraordinary investments in health - in particular, on its investments in health care - as American life expectancy lags behind that of other wealthy nations. As a result, many individuals and organizations, including the Healthy People 2020 initiative, have called for better health and longer lives.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!