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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
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Appendix B

Workshop Agenda

Roundtable on Population Health Improvement and

Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the
Elimination of Health Disparities

Workshop:
Accelerating a Movement to Improve Health and
Promote Health Equity

December 5, 2013

Location: Auditorium, Beckman Center, Irvine, California

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:

  1. Identify key elements of a theoretical and practical framework for movement building to improve population health and health equity
  2. Examine and learn from recent or contemporary health and other social movements
  3. Identify principles and tools and likely challenges and solutions for a process of accelerating a movement for population health improvement and health equity
8:30 a.m. Welcome and Context

David Kindig, co-chair, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement; professor emeritus of population health sciences, emeritus vice chancellor for health sciences, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

 

Mildred Thompson, co-chair, Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities; director, PolicyLink Center for Health and Place

 
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×
8:50 a.m. Presentation: Insights from the Sociology of Social Movements

Francesca Polletta, professor of sociology, School of Social Sciences, University of California, Irvine

 
9:15 a.m. Presentation: Lessons from the Front Lines of a Social Movement

Marshall Ganz, senior lecturer in public policy, Harvard University (by video)

 
9:40 a.m. Discussion with Polletta and Ganz
 
10:10 a.m. Break
 
10:25 a.m. Panel I: Lessons and Insights from Practitioners in Health-Related Movements
 

PANEL OBJECTIVE: To highlight lessons that could be adapted to a broader movement for health and health equity, and to discuss challenges and identify potential solutions.

 

Moderator: Mary Pittman, executive director, Public Health Institute; member, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement

 

Mildred Thompson, director, PolicyLink Center for Health Equity and Place; co-chair, Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities

 

Michelle Larkin, assistant vice president, Health Group, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; member, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement

 

Joan Twiss, executive director, Center for Civic Partnerships

 

Ned Calonge, president and chief executive officer, The Colorado Trust; member, Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities

 

Raymond J. Baxter, senior vice president, Community Benefit, Research and Health Policy; president, Kaiser Foundation International, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×
11:15 a.m. Discussion with Panel I

Moderator: Mary Pittman

 
12:00 p.m. Lunch
 
1:00 p.m. Presentation: A view from The California Endowment
 

Anthony Iton, senior vice president for Healthy Communities, The California Endowment

 
1:15 p.m. Discussion
 
1:30 p.m. Panel II: Lessons and Insights from Other (Non-Health or Not Specifically Health) Social Movements
 

PANEL OBJECTIVE: To elicit from movement practitioners from other domains of social change lessons and key ingredients of movement building.

 

Moderator: Winston Wong, medical director, Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit, Disparities Improvement and Quality Initiatives; member, Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities

Panelists:
Karoleen Feng, community development manager, Mission Economic Development Association

 

Doran Schrantz, executive director, ISAIAH

 

Martha Argüello, executive director, Physicians for Social Responsibility–Los Angeles

 

Gregory T. Angelo, executive director, Log Cabin Republicans

 
2:15 p.m. Discussion with Panel II

Moderator: Winston Wong

 
3:00 p.m. Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×
3:15 p.m.

Reactions to the Day and Significance for Future Action

•     How do the day’s proceedings change what we do?

•     What would a social movement focused on generating broad public support for, investment in, and policy directed at improving population health and health equity look like? What is the basic framework or the key elements, and how do we get there?

•     Advice for the roundtables on filling existing gaps/overcoming barriers?

 

Moderator: George Isham, co-chair of the Roundtable on Population Health Improvement; senior advisor, HealthPartners, senior fellow, HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research

 

Reactor Panel:

Jeff Levi, executive director, Trust for America’s Health; member, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement

 

Sanne Magnan, president and chief executive officer, Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement; member, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement

 
3:40 p.m. Open Discussion

Moderator: George Isham

 
4:30 p.m. Final Reflections on the Day, Discussion, and Opportunity for Public Comment

David Kindig
Mildred Thompson

 
5:00 p.m. Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity: Lessons from Social Movements: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18751.
×
Page 70
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Supporting a Movement for Health and Health Equity is the summary of a workshop convened in December 2013 by the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities and the Roundtable on Population Health Improvement to explore the lessons that may be gleaned from social movements, both those that are health-related and those that are not primarily focused on health. Participants and presenters focused on elements identified from the history and sociology of social change movements and how such elements can be applied to present-day efforts nationally and across communities to improve the chances for long, healthy lives for all.

The idea of movements and movement building is inextricably linked with the history of public health. Historically, most movements - including, for example, those for safer working conditions, for clean water, and for safe food - have emerged from the sustained efforts of many different groups of individuals, which were often organized in order to protest and advocate for changes in the name of such values as fairness and human rights. The purpose of the workshop was to have a conversation about how to support the fragments of health movements that roundtable members believed they could see occurring in society and in the health field. Recent reports from the National Academies have highlighted evidence that the United States gets poor value on its extraordinary investments in health - in particular, on its investments in health care - as American life expectancy lags behind that of other wealthy nations. As a result, many individuals and organizations, including the Healthy People 2020 initiative, have called for better health and longer lives.

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