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A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System (2015)

Chapter: Appendix A: Open Session Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
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Appendix A

Open Session Agendas

The committee held data-gathering sessions that were open to the public in Washington, DC, on July 16, 2013, September 16-17, 2013, and December 16, 2013. The open session agendas for the public meetings and a workshop are presented below.

COMMITTEE ON A FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING THE HEALTH, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND SOCIAL EFFECTS OF THE FOOD SYSTEM

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

The Keck Center, National Academy of Sciences
500 Fifth Street, NW, Room 110
Washington, DC

Open Session
1:00 p.m. Welcome and Introductions
Malden Nesheim, Committee Chair
1:05 p.m. Sponsor Perspectives on the Study
Dana Bourland and Barbara Picower, The JPB Foundation
1:30 p.m. Exploring the True Cost of Food
Helen Jensen, Iowa State University
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
2:00 p.m. Overview of the U.S. Food System
August “Gus” Schumacher, Wholesome Wave Foundation
2:30 p.m. Q&A
3:00 p.m. Break
3:15 p.m. Overview of the Health Effects of the Food System
Robert Lawrence, Johns Hopkins University
3:45 p.m. Overview of the Environmental Effects of the Food System
David Tilman, University of Minnesota
4:15 p.m. Overview of the Social Effects of the Food System
Cornelia Flora, Iowa State University
4:45 p.m. Q&A
5:15 p.m. Public Comments
5:35 p.m. Closing Remarks
5:45 p.m. Adjourn Open Session

MAPPING THE FOOD SYSTEM AND ITS EFFECTS: A WORKSHOP

September 16-17, 2013

The Keck Center, National Academy of Sciences
500 Fifth Street, NW, Room 100
Washington, DC

Workshop Goals

  1. Describe the components of the food system and their relationships.
  2. Explore a broad range of key environmental, socioeconomic, and health effects.
  3. Describe current efforts to identify indicators and develop frameworks that take into consideration environmental, socioeconomic, and health effects of the food system.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
Monday, September 16, 2013
12:30 p.m. Registration
1:30 p.m. Welcome and Introductory Remarks
Malden Nesheim, Committee Chair
Session 1 – Defining the U.S. Food System
1:40 p.m. Introduction
Moderator: Kate Clancy, Committee Member
1:45 p.m. The U.S. Food System from the Perspective of Fruit and Vegetable Producers
Tom Stenzel, United Fresh Produce Association
2:15 p.m. The U.S. Food System from a Manufacturer’s Perspective
Joan Menke Schaenzer, ConAgra Foods
2:45 p.m. Break
3:00 p.m. Broad Overview of the U.S. Food System
Catherine Woteki, U.S. Department of Agriculture
3:30 p.m. The U.S. Role in a Global Food System
K. Scott Portnoy, Cargill Inc.
3:50 p.m. Discussion with Session 1 Speakers
Session 2 – Environmental Effects of the Food System
4:15 p.m. Introduction
Moderator: Scott Swinton, Committee Member
4:20 p.m. Global Challenges to Food Security and the Environment
Jonathan Foley, University of Minnesota
4:40 p.m. Methods to Measure and Value Ecosystem Services and Trade-offs
Jim Boyd, Resources for the Future
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
5:00 p.m. Economic Determinants of Agricultural Land Use in the Long Run
Tom Hertel, Purdue University
5:20 p.m. Modeling the Bio-Geochemistry of Nutrient Flow into Ground and Surface Waters and Air from Various Agro-Ecosystems
R. Cesar Izaurralde, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and University of Maryland
5:40 p.m. Discussion with Session 2 Speakers
6:15 p.m. Adjourn
Tuesday, September 17, 2013
8:00 a.m. Registration
8:30 a.m. Welcome and Recap of Day 1
Malden Nesheim, Committee Chair
Session 3 – Socioeconomic Effects of the Food System
8:40 a.m. Introduction
Moderator: Robbin Johnson, Committee Member
8:45 a.m. Agriculture, Trade, and Rural Development
Robert Thompson, Johns Hopkins University
9:05 a.m. Market Responses to Sustainability in U.S. Agricultural and Food Policies and Practices
Bruce Babcock, Iowa State University
9:25 a.m. Discussion with Session 3 Speakers
9:45 a.m. Break
Session 4 – Health Effects of the Food System
10:00 a.m. Introduction
Moderator: Keshia Pollack, Committee Member
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
10:05 a.m. Consumer Preferences and Marketing as Drivers of the Food Supply
David Just, Cornell University
10:25 a.m. Food Access: Prices and the Retail Environment
Parke Wilde, Tufts University
10:45 a.m. Assessing Food System Effects on Chronic Diseases and Related Health Inequities
Shiriki Kumanyika, University of Pennsylvania
11:05 a.m. Assessing and Managing Health Risks from Chemical Constituents and Contaminants of Food
Joseph Rodricks, ENVIRON
11:25 a.m. Networks of Exchanging Antibiotic Resistance in Human-Associated and Environmental Bacteria
Gautam Dantas, Washington University
11:45 a.m. Discussion with Session 4 Speakers
12:30 p.m. Lunch
Session 5 – Use of Frameworks and Sustainability Indicators
1:30 p.m. Introduction
Moderator: Ross Hammond, Committee Member
1:35 p.m. Use of a Corporate Framework for Social and Environmental Responsibility
Robert Langert, McDonald’s
1:55 p.m. Use of a Corporate Framework for Social and Environmental Responsibility in Contracted Food Service
Helene York, Bon Appetit Management Co.
2:15 p.m. Use of Standards and Indicators to Monitor Food Systems Sustainability
Molly Anderson, College of the Atlantic
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
2:35 p.m. Life Cycle Assessment as a Conceptual and Analytical Framework for Linking Food Production and Consumption
Martin Heller, University of Michigan
2:55 p.m. Use of Cost–Benefit Analysis at FDA
Amber Jessup, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
3:15 p.m. Use of Cost–Benefit Analysis at EPA
Charles Griffiths, Environmental Protection Agency
3:35 p.m. Break
3:50 p.m. Discussion with Session 5 Speakers
4:40 p.m. Public Comments
5:00 p.m. Closing Remarks
Malden Nesheim, Committee Chair
5:15 p.m. Adjourn

December 16, 2013

The Keck Center, National Academy of Sciences
500 Fifth Street, NW, Room 201
Washington, DC

Open Session
12:00 p.m. Food System Workers, United States
Lorann Stallones, Colorado State University
12:45 p.m. Immigration, Farm Workers, and the Food System
Philip Martin, University of California, Davis
1:30 p.m. Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
Page 367
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
Page 368
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
Page 369
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
Page 370
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
Page 371
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18846.
×
Page 372
Next: Appendix B: Selected Metrics, Methodologies, Data, and Models »
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How we produce and consume food has a bigger impact on Americans' well-being than any other human activity. The food industry is the largest sector of our economy; food touches everything from our health to the environment, climate change, economic inequality, and the federal budget. From the earliest developments of agriculture, a major goal has been to attain sufficient foods that provide the energy and the nutrients needed for a healthy, active life. Over time, food production, processing, marketing, and consumption have evolved and become highly complex. The challenges of improving the food system in the 21st century will require systemic approaches that take full account of social, economic, ecological, and evolutionary factors. Policy or business interventions involving a segment of the food system often have consequences beyond the original issue the intervention was meant to address.

A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System develops an analytical framework for assessing effects associated with the ways in which food is grown, processed, distributed, marketed, retailed, and consumed in the United States. The framework will allow users to recognize effects across the full food system, consider all domains and dimensions of effects, account for systems dynamics and complexities, and choose appropriate methods for analysis. This report provides example applications of the framework based on complex questions that are currently under debate: consumption of a healthy and safe diet, food security, animal welfare, and preserving the environment and its resources.

A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System describes the U.S. food system and provides a brief history of its evolution into the current system. This report identifies some of the real and potential implications of the current system in terms of its health, environmental, and socioeconomic effects along with a sense for the complexities of the system, potential metrics, and some of the data needs that are required to assess the effects. The overview of the food system and the framework described in this report will be an essential resource for decision makers, researchers, and others to examine the possible impacts of alternative policies or agricultural or food processing practices.

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