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Suggested Citation:"Notes." National Research Council. 2015. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21740.
×

NOTES

1Peter, N. (2002). Outcomes and Research in Out-of-School Time Program Design. Philadelphia, PA: Best Practices Institute.

2National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments, P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

3Shankar, M., and Kalil, T. (2013). Leveraging Mental Muscle for Academic Excellence. Washington, DC: Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President. Available: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/06/28/leveraging-mental-muscle-academic-excellence [February 2015].

4Barron, B. (2006). Interest and self-sustained learning as catalyst of development: A learning ecologies perspective. Human Development, 49, 193-224.

Bell, P., Bricker, L.A., Tzou, C., Lee, T., and Van Horne, K. (2012). Engaging learners in scientific practices related to obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. The Science Teacher, 79(8), 31-36.

Falk, J.H., and Dierking, L.D. (2010). The 95% solution: School is not where most Americans learn most of their science. American Scientist, 98, 486-493.

Falk, J.H., Dierking, L.D., Osborne, J., Wenger, M., Dawson, E.. and Wong, B. (2015). Analyzing science education in the UK: Taking a system-wide approach. Science Education, 99(1), 145-173.

Gutiérrez, K., and Rogoff, B. (2003). Cultural ways of learning: Individual traits or repertoires of practice. Educational Researcher, 32(5), 19-25.

Traphagen, K., and Traill, S. (2014). How Cross-Sector Collaborations Are Advancing STEM Learning. Palo Alto, CA: Noyce Foundation.

5Bronfenbrenner, U. (1977). Toward an experimental ecology of human development. American Psychologist, 32(7), 513-531.

Bronfenbrenner, U., and Morris, P.A. (2006). The bio-ecological model of human development. In W. Damon and R.M. Lerner (Eds.), Handbook of Child Psychology, Volume 1: Theoretical Models of Human Development (6th ed., pp. 793-828). New York: Wiley.

Krishnamurthi, A. (2015). STEM Learning Across Settings: Cultivating Learning Ecosystems. Afterschool Advocate

Newsletter-Afterschool Snack. Available: http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/afterschoolsnack/ASnack.cfm?idBlog=42F434BF-215A-A6B3-02FE5A2917CC75A9 [January 2015].

McLaughlin, M. (2000). Community Counts: How Youth Organizations Matter for Youth Development. Washington, DC: Public Education Network.

6Bevan, B., with Dillon, J., Hein, G.E., Macdonald, M., Michalchik, V., Miller, D., Root, D., Rudder, L., Xanthoudaki, M., and Yoon, S. (2010). Making Science Matter: Collaborations Between Informal Science Education Organizations and Schools. A CAISE Inquiry Group Report. Washington, DC: Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education.

National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education. Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Traphagen, K., and Traill, S. (2014). How Cross-Sector Collaborations Are Advancing STEM Learning. Palo Alto, CA: Noyce Foundation.

7Overton, W.F. (2015). Processes, relations, and relational-developmental-systems. In W.F. Overton and P.C.M. Molenaar (Eds.), Theory and Method: Handbook of Child Psychology and Developmental Science, Volume 1, Seventh Edition (pp. 9-62). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

8Elder, G.H., Shanahan, M.J., and Jennings, J. (2015). Human development in time and place. In R. Lerner, M. Bornstein, and T. Levanthal (Eds.), Handbook of Child Psychology and Developmental Science: Ecological Settings and Processes in Developmental Systems (pp. 1-49). New York: Wiley.

9National Research Council. (2011). Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Committee on Highly Successful Science Programs for K-12 Science Education. Board on Science Education and Board on Testing and Assessment, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

10Jolly, E., Campbell, P., and Perlman, L. (2004). Engagement, Capacity, and Continuity: A Trilogy for Student Success. Groton, MA, and Minneapolis, MN: Campbell-Kibler Associates and Science Museum of Minnesota.

Suggested Citation:"Notes." National Research Council. 2015. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21740.
×

National Research Council. (2011). Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Committee on Highly Successful Science Programs for K-12 Science Education. Board on Science Education and Board on Testing and Assessment, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

11Stevens, R., Bransford, J., and Stevens, A. (2005). The LIFE Center’s Life-long and Life-wide Diagram. Available: http://life-slc.org/about/citationdetails.html [February 2015].

12Dierking, L.D., Falk, J.H., Holland, G., Fisher, S., Schatz, D., and Wilke, L. (1997). Collaboration: Critical Criteria for Success. Washington, DC: Association of Science-Technology Centers.

Lee, J.J., and Hammer, J. (2011). Gamification in education: What, how, why bother? Academic Exchange Quarterly, 15(2), 1-5.

Hill, N.E., Tyson, D.F., and Bromell, L. (2009). Parental involvement in middle school: Developmentally appropriate strategies across SES and ethnicity. In N.E. Hill and R.K. Chao (Eds.), Families, Schools, and the Adolescent: Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice (pp. 53-72). New York: Teachers College Press.

National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education. Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

13Afterschool Alliance. (2013). Defining Youth Outcomes for STEM Learning in Afterschool. Available: http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/STEM_Outcomes_2013.pdf [February 2015].

National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

14National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.).

Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

15Ibid.

16U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Justice. (2000). Working for Children and Families: Safe and Smart Afterschool Programs. Available: http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OESE/archives/pubs/parents/SafeSmart/green-1.doc [February 2015].

17National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

18Pierce, K.M., Auger, A., and Vandell, D.L. (2013). Narrowing the Achievement Gap: Consistency and Intensity of Structured Activities During Elementary School. Paper presented at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, April, Seattle, WA.

Vandell, D.L., Reisner, R.R., and Pierce, K.M. (2007). Outcomes Linked to High-Quality Afterschool Programs: A Longitudinal Study of Promising Afterschool Programs. Unpublished report prepared for the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation. Available: http://www.education.uci.edu/childcare/pdf/afterschool/PP%20Longitudinal%20Findings%20Final%20Report.pdf [February 2015].

19Christensen, R., Knezek, G., and Tyler-Wood, T. (2015). A retrospective analysis of STEM career interest among mathematics and science academy students. International Journal of Learning, Teaching, and Educational Research, 10(1), 45-58.

Garg, R., Kauppi, C., Urajnik, D., and Lewko, J. (2007). A longitudinal study of the effects of context and experience on the scientific career choices of Canadian adolescents. Canadian Journal of Career Development, 9(1), 15-24. Available: http://ceric.ca/cjcd/archives/v9-n1/article2.pdf [February 2015].

Jones, G., Taylor, A., and Forrester, J.H. (2011). Developing a scientist: A retrospective look. International Journal of Science Education, 33(12), 1653-1673.

Tan, E., and Calabrese Barton, A. (2007). From peripheral to central, the story of Melanie’s metamorphosis in an urban middle school science class. Science Education, 92(4), 567-590.

Suggested Citation:"Notes." National Research Council. 2015. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21740.
×

20Bell, P., Bricker, L., Reeve, S., Toomey Zimmerman, H., and Tzou, C. (2013). Discovering and supporting successful learning pathways of youth in and out of school: Accounting for the development of everyday expertise across settings. In B. Bevan, P. Bell, R. Stevens, and A. Razfar (Eds.), LOST Opportunities: Learning in Out-of-School Time (pp. 119-140). Heidelberg, Germany: Springer Netherlands.

21Afterschool Alliance. (2014). America After 3 PM: Afterschool Programs in Demand. Washington, DC: Author. Available: http://afterschoolalliance.org/documents/AA3PM-2014/AA3PM_National_Report.pdf [February 2015].

22Ibid.

2321st Century Community Learning Centers Program, Office of Academic Improvement Programs, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, U.S. Department of Education. (2015). Programs, 21st Century Community Learning Centers home page. Available: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/21stcclc/awards.html [February 2015].

24Afterschool Alliance. (2014). America After 3 PM: Afterschool Programs in Demand. Washington, DC: Author. Available: http://afterschoolalliance.org/documents/AA3PM-2014/AA3PM_National_Report.pdf [February 2015].

25House, A., Llorente, C., Leones, T., and Lundh, P. (2014). Navigating the Future of Afterschool Science: Afterschool Science Networks Study Recommendations. Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.

26National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2002). Community Programs to Promote Youth Development. Committee on Community-Level Programs for Youth. J. Eccles and J.A. Gootman (Eds.). Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

27National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2002). Community Programs to Promote Youth Development. Committee on Community-Level Programs for Youth. J. Eccles and J.A. Gootman (Eds.). Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

28National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

29Banks, J.A., Au, K.H., Ball, A.F., Bell, P., Gordon, E.W., Gutiérrez, K.D., and Zhou, M. (2007). Learning in and out of School in Diverse Environments: Life-long, Life-wide, Life-deep. Seattle, WA: The LIFE Center, University of Washington, Stanford University, and SRI International and Center for Multicultural Education, University of Washington. Available: http://life-slc.org/docs/Banks_etal-LIFE-DiversityReport.pdf [May 2015].

Ito, M., Gutiérrez, K., Livingstone, S., Penuel, W., Rhodes, J., Salen, K., Schor, J., Sefton-Green, J., and Watkins, S.C. (2012). Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design. Chicago, IL: MacArthur Foundation.

National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. (2014). STEM Integration in K-12 Education: Status, Prospects, and an Agenda for Research. M. Honey, G. Pearson, and H. Schweinguber (Eds.). Committee on Integrated STEM Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

30Gutiérrez, K., and Vossoughi, S. (2010). “Lifting off the ground to return anew”: Documenting and designing for equity and transformation through social design experiments. Journal of Teacher Education, 61(1-2), 100-117.

Nasir, N., Rosebery, A., Warren, B., and Lee, C.D. (2006). Learning as a cultural process: Achieving equity through diversity. In K. Sawyer (Ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences (pp. 489-504). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2002). Community Programs to Promote Youth Development. Committee on Community-Level Programs for Youth. J. Eccles, and J.A. Gootman (Eds.). Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

31Falk, J.H., Dierking, L.D., Staus, N., Penuel, W., Wyld, J., and Bailey, D. (in press). Understanding and connecting youth STEM interest and participation across the community: The SYNERGIES Project. International Journal of Science Education, Part B.

Ito, M., Gutiérrez, K., Livingstone, S., Penuel, W., Rhodes, J., Salen, K., Schor, J., Sefton-Green, J., and Watkins, S.C. (2012). Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design. Chicago, IL: MacArthur Foundation.

Suggested Citation:"Notes." National Research Council. 2015. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21740.
×

National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

32Bang, M., Warren, B., Rosebery, A., and Medin, D. (2012). Desettling expectations in science education. Human Development, 55, 302-318.

Jolly, E., Campbell, P., and Perlman, L. (2004). Engagement, Capacity, and Continuity: A Trilogy for Student Success. Groton, MA, and Minneapolis: Campbell-Kibler Associates and Science Museum of Minnesota.

National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. (2014). STEM Integration in K-12 Education: Status, Prospects, and an Agenda for Research. M. Honey, G. Pearson, and H. Schweinguber (Eds.). Committee on Integrated STEM Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

33National Research Council. (2011). Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Committee on Highly Successful Science Programs for K-12 Science Education. Board on Science Education and Board on Testing and Assessment, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

House, A., Llorente, C., Leones, T., and Lundh, P. (2014). Navigating the Future of Afterschool Science: Afterschool Science Networks Study Recommendations. Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.

34Ibid.

35National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Barton, A., and Roth, W. (2005). Rethinking scientific literacy. Canadian Journal of Education, 28(3), 561-566.

36Heath, S., and McLaughlin, M. (1994). The best of both worlds: Connecting schools and community youth organizations for all-day, all-year learning. Educational Administration Quarterly, 30(3), 278-300.

National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2002). Community Programs to Promote Youth Development. Committee on Community-Level Programs for Youth. J. Eccles and J.A. Gootman (Eds.). Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Mahoney, J.L., Lord, H., and Carryl, E. (2005). An ecological analysis of after-school program participation and the development of academic performance and motivational attributes for disadvantaged children. Child Development, 76, 811-825.

37Bowers, E.P., Li, Y., Kiely, M.K., Brittian, A., Lerner, J.V., and Lerner, R.M. (2010). The five Cs model of positive youth development: A longitudinal analysis of confirmatory factor structure and measurement invariance. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 39(7), 720-735.

Jelicic, H., Bobek, D., Phelps, E.D., Lerner, J.V., and Lerner, R.M. (2007). Using positive youth development to predict contribution and risk behaviors in early adolescence: Findings from the first two waves of the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 31(3), 263-273.

Lerner, R.M., Lerner, J.V., Lewin-Bizan, S., Bowers, E.P., Boyd, M., Mueller, M., Schmid, K., and Napolitano, C. (2011). Positive youth development: Processes, programs, and problematics. Journal of Youth Development, 6(3), 40-64.

National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2002). Community Programs to Promote Youth Development. Committee on Community-Level Programs for Youth, J. Eccles, and J.A. Gootman (Eds.). Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Phelps, E., Zimmerman, S., Warren, A.E.A., Jelicic, H., von Eye, A., and Lerner, R.M. (2009). The structure and developmental course of positive youth development (PYD) in early adolescence: Implications for theory and practice. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 30(5), 571-584.

38Bruner, J. (1960). The Process of Education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bedderman, T. (1982). What research says: Activity science—the evidence shows it matters. Science and Children, 20(1), 39-41.

Suggested Citation:"Notes." National Research Council. 2015. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21740.
×

National Research Council. (2012). A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Committee on Conceptual Framework for the New K-12 Science Education Standards. Board on Science Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

39Remold, R., Verdugo, R., and Michalchik, V. (2013). California Tinkering Afterschool Network Pilot Year Evaluation Report. Menlo Park, CA: SRI International. Available: http://www.sri.com/work/publications/california-tinker-ing-afterschool-network [February 2015].

40Furtak, E., Seidel, T., Iverson, H., and Briggs, D.C. (2013). Experimental and quasi-experimental studies of inquiry-based science teaching: A meta-analysis. Review of Educational Research, 82(3), 300-329.

Minner, D.D., Levy, A.J., and Century, J. (2010). Inquiry based science instruction—What is it and does it matter? Results from a research synthesis years 1984 to 2002. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 47(4), 474-496.

41Bedderman, T. (1982). What research says: Activity science—the evidence shows it matters. Science and Children, 20(1), 39-41.

42National Research Council. (2012). A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Committee on Conceptual Framework for the New K-12 Science Education Standards. Board on Science Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

43Ibid.

44Vossoughi, S., Escudé, M., Kong, F., and Hooper, P. (2013). Tinkering, Learning, and Equity in the After-School Setting. Paper presented at the FabLearn Conference, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

45Granger, R., Durlak, J.A., Yohalem, N., and Reisner, E. (2007). Improving After-School Program Quality. New York: William T. Grant Foundation. Available: http://www.wtgrantfoundation.org/publications_and_reports/browse_reports/Imp_AS_Granger_Yohalem_Durlak [February 2015].

Mahoney, J.L., Parente, M.E., and Zigler, E.F. (2010). After-school program participation and children’s development. In J. Meece and J.S. Eccles (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Schools, Schooling, and Human Development (pp. 379-397). New York: Routledge.

46Bevan, B., Michalchik, V., Bhanot, R., Rauch, N., Remold, J., Semper, R., and Shields, P. (2010). Out-of-School Time STEM: Building Experience, Building Bridges. Trends Questions and Findings from the Field. San Francisco: The Exploratorium. Available: http://stelar.edc.org/sites/stelar.edc.org/files/STEM_OST_Conf_Report.pdf [May 2015].

47Calabrese Barton, A., and Tan, E. (2009). Funds of knowledge and discourses and hybrid space. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46(1), 50-73.

Immordino-Yang, M.H., and Damasio, A.R. (2007). We feel, therefore we learn: The relevance of affective and social neuroscience to education. Mind, Brain, and Education, 1(1), 3-10.

48Lederman, N.G., Abd-El-Khalick, F., Bell, R.L., and Schwartz, R.S. (2002). Views of Nature of Science Questionnaire: Toward valid and meaningful assessment of learners’ conceptions of nature of science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 39(6), 497-521.

49Finson, K.D. (2001). Applicability of the DAST-C to the images of scientists drawn by students of different racial groups. Journal of Elementary Science Education, 15, 15-26.

Finson, K.D. (2002). Drawing a scientist: What we do and do not after fifty years of drawings. School Science and Mathematics, 102, 335-346.

50Newton, D.P., and Newton, L.D. (1992). Young children’s perceptions of science and the scientist. International Journal of Science Education, 14, 331-348.

Barman, C.R. (1996). How do students really view science and scientists? Science and Children, 34, 30-33.

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51Engle, R.A. (2006). Framing interactions to foster generative learning: A situative explanation of transfer in a community of learners classroom. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 15(4), 451-498.

National Research Council. (2012). A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Committee on Conceptual Framework for the New K-12 Science Education Standards. Board on Science Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"Notes." National Research Council. 2015. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21740.
×

52Ben-Eliyahu, A., Rhodes, J.E., and Scales, P. (2014). The interest-driven pursuits of 15 year olds: “Sparks” and their association with caring relationships and developmental outcomes. Applied Developmental Science, 18(2), 76-89.

Engle, R.A., and Conant, F.C. (2002). Guiding principles for fostering productive disciplinary engagement: Explaining an emergent argument in a community of learners classroom. Cognition and Instruction, 20(4), 399-483.

53Hammer, D., Goldberg, F., and Fargason, S. (2012). Responsive teaching and the beginnings of energy in a third grade classroom. Review of Science, Mathematics and ICT Education, 6(1), 51-72.

54Hidi, S., and Renninger, K. (2006). The four-phase model of interest development. Educational Psychologist, 41(2), 111-127.

55Anderman, E.M., Eccles, J.S., Yoon, K.S., and Roeser, R. (2001). Learning to value mathematics and reading: Relations to mastery and performance-oriented instructional practices. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 26(1), 76-95.

56Yeager, D.S., and Dweck, C.S. (2012). Mindsets that promote resilience: When students believe that personal characteristics can be developed. Educational Psychologist, 47, 1-13.

Duckworth, A.L., Peterson, C., Matthews, M.D., and Kelly, D.R. (2007). Grit: Perseverance and passion for long-term goals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92, 1087-1101.

57Barton, A., and Roth, W. (2005). Rethinking scientific literacy. Canadian Journal of Education 28(3), 561-566.

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58Aikenhead, G. (2005). Science Education for Everyday Life: Evidence-Based Practice. Ways of Knowing in Science and Mathematics Series. New York: Columbia University, Teachers College Press.

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61Vossoughi, S., Escudé, M., Kong, F., and Hooper, P. (2013). Tinkering, Learning, and Equity in the After-School Setting. Paper presented at the FabLearn Conference, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

Suggested Citation:"Notes." National Research Council. 2015. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21740.
×

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68Nasir, N., and Hand, V. (2006). Exploring sociocultural perspectives on race, culture, and learning. Review of Educational Research, 76(4), 449-475.

69Luehmann, A.L. (2009). Students’ perspectives of a science enrichment programme: Out-of-school inquiry as access. International Journal of Science Education, 31(13), 1831-1855.

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72Azevedo, F.S. (2011). Lines of practice: A practice-centered theory of interest relationships. Cognition and Instruction, 29(2), 147-184.

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73Calabrese Barton, A., and Tan, E. (2010). “We be burnin!” Agency, identity, and science learning. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 19(2), 187-229.

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77O’Leary, E., and Soep, L. (2014). Youth Radio’s DO IT! Initiative Summative Evaluation: Final Project Report. Available: http://informalscience.org/images/evaluation/2014-12-16_Youth%20Radio%20DO%20IT%20Final%20Report.pdf [February 2015].

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80Bransford, J.D., Barron, B., Pea, R.D., Meltzoff, A., Kuhl, P., Bell, P., Stevens, R., Schwartz, D.L., Vye, N., Reeves, B., Roschelle, R., and Sabelli, N. (2005). Foundations and opportunities for an interdisciplinary science of learning. In R.K. Sawyer (Ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences (pp. 19-34). New York: Cambridge University Press.

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81Vossoughi, S., Escudé, M., Kong, F., and Hooper, P. (2013). Tinkering, Learning, and Equity in the After-School Setting. Paper presented at the FabLearn Conference, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

82Azevedo, F.S., diSessa, A., and Sherin, B. (2012). An evolving framework for describing student engagement in classroom activities. Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 31, 270-289.

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×

83Ito, M., Gutiérrez, K., Livingstone, S., Penuel, W., Rhodes, J., Salen, K., Schor, J., Sefton-Green, J., and Watkins, S.C. (2012). Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design. Chicago, IL: MacArthur Foundation.

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84Bevan, B., with Dillon, J., Hein, G.E., Macdonald, M., Michalchik, V., Miller, D., Root, D., Rudder, L., Xanthoudaki, M., and Yoon, S. (2010). Making Science Matter: Collaborations Between Informal Science Education Organizations and Schools. A CAISE Inquiry Group Report. Washington, DC: Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education.

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85Barron, B. (2006). Interest and self-sustained learning as catalysts of development: A learning ecology perspective. Human Development, 49, 193-224.

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86Falk, J.H., Dierking, L.D., Staus, N., Penuel, W., Wyld, J., and Bailey, D. (in press). Understanding and connecting youth STEM interest and participation across the community: The SYNERGIES project. International Journal of Science Education, Part B.

87Ito, M., Gutiérrez, K., Livingstone, S., Penuel, W., Rhodes, J., Salen, K., Schor, J., Sefton-Green, J., and Watkins, S.C. (2012). Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design. Chicago, IL: MacArthur Foundation.

88National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

89Falk, J.H., and Dierking, L.D. (2010). The 95% solution: School is not where most Americans learn most of their science. American Scientist, 98, 486-493.

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90Lerner, R.M., and Lerner, J.V. (2013). The Positive Development of Youth: Comprehensive Findings from the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development. Washington, DC: National 4-H Council.

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91Bevan, B., Dillon, J., Hein, G.E., Macdonald, M., Michalchik, V., Miller, D., Root, D., Rudder, L., Xanthoudaki, M., and Yoon, S. (2010). Making Science Matter: Collaborations Between Informal Science Education Organizations and Schools. A CAISE Inquiry Group Report. Washington, DC: Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education.

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×

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93Bevan, B., Dillon, J., Hein, G.E., Macdonald, M., Michalchik, V., Miller, D., Root, D., Rudder, L., Xanthoudaki, M., and Yoon, S. (2010). Making Science Matter: Collaborations Between Informal Science Education Organizations and Schools. A CAISE Inquiry Group Report. Washington, DC: Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education.

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94Dierking, L.D., Falk, J.H., Holland, G., Fisher, S., Schatz, D., and Wilke, L. (1997). Collaborations: Critical Criteria for Success. Washington, DC: Association of Science-Technology Centers.

95Thorhauge, S. (2014). Interface learning: New goals for museums and upper secondary school collaboration. Dissertation Abstracts. Available: http://pure.au.dk/portal/files/85300766/PhD_Interface_Learning_New_goals_for_museum_and_upper_secondary_school_collaboration.pdf [May 2015].

96Falk, J.H., Dierking, L.D., Staus, N., Penuel, W., Wyld, J., and Bailey, D. (in press). Understanding and connecting youth STEM interest and participation across the community: The SYNERGIES project. International Journal of Science Education, Part B.

97Falk, J.H., Staus, N., Dierking, L.D., Wyld, J., Bailey, D., and Penuel, W. (2015). The SYNERGIES project: Preliminary results and insights from two years of longitudinal survey research. Museology Quarterly, 29(1), 15-21.

98Banks, J.A., Au, K.H., Ball, A.F., Bell, P., Gordon, E. W., Gutiérrez, K.D., and Zhou, M. (2007). Learning in and out of School in Diverse Environments: Life-long, Life-wide, Life-deep. Seattle, WA: The LIFE Center, University of Washington, Stanford University, and SRI International and Center for Multicultural Education, University of Washington.

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99Farrin, L., and Mokros, J. (2012). Energy monitoring: Powerful connections between math, science, and community, Science Scope, 36(3), 23-28.

100Ito, M., Gutiérrez, K., Livingstone, S., Penuel, W., Rhodes, J., Salen, K., Schor, J., Sefton-Green, J., and Watkins, S.C. (2012). Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design. Chicago, IL: MacArthur Foundation.

101Penuel, W.P., Lee, T., and Bevan, B. (2014). Designing and Building Infrastructures to Support Equitable STEM Learning Across Settings. Research + Practice Collaboratory Research Synthesis. San Francisco: The Exploratorium.

102Wellman, B., and Frank, K. (2001). Network capital in a multi-level world: Getting support from personal communities. In N. Lin, K. Cook, and R. Burt (Eds.), Social Capital: Theory and Research (pp. 233-273). Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter.

103Stevens, R., O’Connor, K., Garrison, L., Jocuns, A., and Amos, D. (2008). Becoming an engineer: Toward a three-dimensional view of engineering learning. Journal of Engineering Education, 97(3), 355-368.

104Peter, N. (2009). Defining our terms: Professional development in out-of-school time. Afterschool Matters, 8(2), 34-41.

105Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2003). The Unsolved Challenge of System Reform: The Condition of the Frontline Human Services Workforce. Baltimore, MD: Author.

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106Peter, N. (2007). Promising Practices in Out-of-School Time Professional Development. Philadelphia, PA:

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×

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107National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2002). Community Programs to Promote Youth Development. Committee on Community-Level Programs for Youth, J. Eccles and J.A. Gootman (Eds.). Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

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108For information on the distinctions and relationship among these three types of evaluation, see pp. 22-25 in Stufflebeam, D.L., and Shinkfield, A.J. (2007). Evaluation Theory, Models, and Applications. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

109Mezirow, J. (2000). Learning as Transformation: Critical Perspectives on a Theory in Progress. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

110Barron, B. (2014). Formative Assessment for STEM Learning Ecosystems: Biographical Approaches as a Resource for Research and Practice. Commissioned paper for Successful Out-of-School STEM Learning: A Consensus Study, Board on Science Education, June, National Research Council, Washington, DC. Available: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/cs/groups/dbassesite/documents/webpage/dbasse_089994.pdf [May 2015].

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111Falk, J.H., and Dierking, L.D. (2000). Learning from Museums: Visitor Experiences and the Making of Meaning. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.

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112Lemke, J.L., Lecusay, R., Cole, M., and Michalchik, V. (2015). Documenting and Assessing Learning in Informal and Media-Rich Environments. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

113Penuel, W.R., Fishman, B., Cheng, B.H., and Sabelli, N. (2011). Organizing research and development at the intersection of learning, implementation, and design. Educational Researcher, 40(7), 331-337.

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114Christensen, R., Knezek, G., and Tyler-Wood, T. (2015). A retrospective analysis of STEM career interest among mathematics and science academy students. International Journal of Learning, Teaching, and Education Research, 10(1), 45-58.

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115Michalchik, V., and Gallagher, L. (2010). Naturalizing assessment. Curator, 53(2), 209-219.

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116Pierce, K.M., Auger, A., and Vandell, D.L. (2013). Narrowing the Achievement Gap: Consistency and Intensity of Structured Activities During Elementary School. Paper presented at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, April, Seattle, WA.

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117Zimmerman, H.T. (2012). Participation in science at home: Recognition work and learning in biology. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 49(5), 597-630.

118Bathgate, M.E., Schunn, C.D., and Correnti, R. (2013). Children’s motivation toward science across contexts, manner-of-interaction, and topic. Science Education, 98(2), 189-215.

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119Azevedo, F.S. (2011). Lines of practice: A practice-centered theory of interest relationships. Cognition and Instruction, 29(2), 147-184.

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120Ellenbogen, K. (2014). Summary of the CAISE Convening on Building Capacity for Evaluation in Informal Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Education. Washington, DC: Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education. Available: http://informalscience.org/research/ic-000-000-010-034/ECB_Convening_Summary [February 2015].

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121Michalchik, V., and Gallagher, L. (2010). Naturalizing assessment. Curator, 53(2), 209-219.

122Noam, G., and Shah, A.M. (2013). Game Changers and the Assessment Predicament in Afterschool Science. Belmont, MA: Program in Education, Afterschool, and Resiliency.

123National Research Council. (2000). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School—Expanded Edition. Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning, J.D. Bransford, A.L. Brown, and R.R. Cocking (Eds.) and Committee on Learning Research and Education Practice, M.S. Donovan, J.D. Bransford, and J. Pellegrino (Eds.). Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington DC: National Academy Press.

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124National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

125National Research Council. (2009). Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. P. Bell, B. Lewenstein, A.W. Shouse, and M.A. Feder (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

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Suggested Citation:"Notes." National Research Council. 2015. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21740.
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Suggested Citation:"Notes." National Research Council. 2015. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21740.
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Suggested Citation:"Notes." National Research Council. 2015. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21740.
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Next: Appendix A: Successful Out-of-School STEM Learning Summit Agenda »
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More and more young people are learning about science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in a wide variety of afterschool, summer, and informal programs. At the same time, there has been increasing awareness of the value of such programs in sparking, sustaining, and extending interest in and understanding of STEM. To help policy makers, funders and education leaders in both school and out-of-school settings make informed decisions about how to best leverage the educational and learning resources in their community, this report identifies features of productive STEM programs in out-of-school settings. Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings draws from a wide range of research traditions to illustrate that interest in STEM and deep STEM learning develop across time and settings. The report provides guidance on how to evaluate and sustain programs. This report is a resource for local, state, and federal policy makers seeking to broaden access to multiple, high-quality STEM learning opportunities in their community.

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